Bay City grapevine
Back
John Sollman   Welcome to the past issues of --
Over The Back Fence 2012

December 31, 2012

Over The Back Fence
John R. Sollman, Editor and Publisher

Bay City Grapevine

BAY CITY, December 31, 2012 --- Here it is, New Year’s Eve. As I write these lines, there are fewer than four hours remaining in 2012. For some reason, each year seems to go by more quickly than the last. When I was a child, it seemed that each day lasted forever, and Christmas, which was “right around the corner,” seemed to take an eternity to arrive. But the New Year is nearly upon us. Soon we will be buried in figuring our taxes and how to come up with the scratch to pay Uncle what we owe for underpayment. (Did you know that tax withholding came about during the early war years, when Uncle was badly in need of revenue to finance the war. It was known as the Rummel “Pay as you Go Plan.”) Here’s wishing all of you a Very Happy and Prosperous New Year. Take care, and be safe.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters celebrated Christmas a few days late this year, on Dec. 28, to be exact. There was no formal meeting, just a nice dinner of ham and scalloped potatoes, supplemented by the great side dishes brought in by the members.

We had a Chinese gift exchange, with lots of nice gifts. No one swiped Sharline’s gift this time, but I managed to swipe something she really wanted. Each member draws a number, and selects a gift as his or her number is called. A participant may take a wrapped gift from under the tree, or select an unwrapped gift previously selected by someone else. A gift can be swiped up to three times before it becomes the permanent property of the person holding it. The exchange ends when the last wrapped gift is selected from under the tree.

Pat Vining is to be thanked for the great ham and scalloped potatoes he prepared for the dinner. Pat is a great cook, having sharpened his skills during his summer sojourns as chief cook, bottle washer and wine steward at an upscale fish camp in Alaska. He does a great job.

As an extra touch, Linda Vining poured a glass of sparkling cider (not the hard stuff) for each of us, for individual toasts to hoped-for events in the New Year.

Thoughts for the New Year

The way things seem to be going in Washington, I think we’d all be wise to buy a lot of rope so we can rappel down that fiscal cliff. Or, the more agile among us might want consider parachutes so we can station jump off the cliff.

Then, with the borrowing limit once again about to max out, I wonder whether retired guys like me will still get our retirement checks. Timmy Geithner discovered that it was maxing out Dec. 31 instead of Feb. 28 as he had predicted earlier, so he did a bit of accounting smoke and mirrors to make it look like the debt limit was approaching more slowly. I guess that was something like what the Maccabees did with the oil in the temple lamps when the Assyrians were banging on the doors. That one-day supply held out for eight days.

I wonder if I can get Geithner to do that trick with my checkbook. I could sure use the boost to stimulate the economy --- my own.

Then, with the IRS reprogramming all its computers to accommodate whatever tax rate we’ll end up paying, we taxpayers will have to delay filing until the Feds get their act together. But just think of all the revenue they can scrape up through the fines we’ll be paying for late filing and underpaying our taxes. That might take a big chunk out of our national debt. Maybe we should do that more often.

Then there is the issue of guns. Maybe Archie Bunker was right when he offered the solution to hijacking, a la D.B. Cooper. Just pass out the pistols to all the passengers boarding the aircraft. That’ll make any nascent hijacker think twice before trying any funny stuff. Perhaps if we were to arm everyone entering a school, theater, shopping mall or whatever, crazy people would think twice before shooting up the place. And just think of all the money we’d save on prosecution and prison. You can’t try a dead gunman. And I we could create a special holiday to honor all those heroes who get killed or wounded in crime prevention crossfire during the year.

Finally, we have the matter of our personal New Year’s Resolutions. These are probably the most recycled of any human endeavor. Every year we vow to take off all those extra pounds we packed on during our six weeks of year-end excesses, starting with Thanksgiving and partying on until after New Year’s Day. But somehow, once the New Year arrives, we never seem to find an appropriate time to start reducing. There’s always next year.

Thanks to our Fire Department

A good friend had a really lousy December. A serial failure of appliances culminated with the failure of the water heater just before Christmas. But the brand new replacement water heater failed to heat water. Bummer. After an extended period of cold water living, my friends were eager to enjoy the luxury of a hot shower.

What to do? My friend was relieved to learn that the problem was not the new water heater. When a tester showed no current reaching the heater, it was obvious that the problem lay in the wiring between the panel and the heater.

Ingenuity to the rescue. Just run a temporary connection between the panel and the water heater. That will suffice to heat water for the much-needed showers, and the connection could be removed once that need is fulfilled.

My friend obtained a 50-foot coil of Romex cable to do the job. An electrician would presumably use the wire later to make a permanent repair, so, it would probably be best not to cut the wire to length now. There might not be enough later. The excess wire was simply left in a coil on the kitchen floor while the water was heated for the showers. A check of the water heater after a few minutes proved that it was working flawlessly, and soon it would be shower time.

Not one to waste time, my friend left to do a few more errands while the water heated. Upon return, he found his wife in a panic and the Fire Department on the scene bringing things back under control.

 

I am sharing this story not as a hot, late-breaking news item, but as a matter of safety. In my younger days, I’ve done some domestic wiring under the supervision of a licensed electrician, so I learned some basics.

Here’s the rub. There are limits on how much wire can be run together. For a thin wall metal conduit, the limit for #10 wire is five wires. For a PVC conduit, the limit is four. One of the reasons is that current running along a wire and the electromagnetic field around the wire cause heating to occur. When there are too many wires in close proximity, the wires will heat up faster than the heat can dissipate. A coil of wire lying on the floor is similar to wire running through a conduit, since there are many wires in very close proximity. The coiled wire became hot and caused some smoke and floor damage before the circuit breaker tripped.

  But, thanks to Bay City’s outstanding Fire Department, the matter was quickly in hand and under control. The firefighters even brought in a large electric fan to blow out the fumes.

My friends asked me, when writing this story, to thank the Fire Department for their fast response, professionalism, and courtesy. I’ve always been a supporter of our Fire Department. Bay City is indeed fortunate to have one of the finest volunteer fire departments in the state. So, thank you, guys, for a job well done.

Veterans in Need of Firewood

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced at a recent VFW meeting, that there is a need for firewood for needy veterans. Anyone who has firewood to donate should contact the Veterans’ Service Office at (503) 842-4358.

  Dinner at Downie’s Café

Downie’s Café is open for dinner Thursday through Sunday. Winter dinner hours are from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sharline and I came down for the special last Thursday. It was spaghetti, which was it was outstanding.

Bay City Arts Center

I have not heard from the Arts Center since well before Christmas, so I can’t tell you about the January Artist of the Month.

The January Pancake Breakfast will be held January 20, the third Sunday.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. The phone number is (503) 377-9620.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend.

Art Happenings in Newport

The Oregon Coast Council for the Arts announced recently that the works of Clatsop County visual artist Darren Orange are featured at the Newport Visual Arts Center starting January 4 and running through January 26. An opening reception will be held January 4 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Visual Arts Center.

Orange’s exhibit, entitled “AnteSeedent,” will include paintings and photo-based aluminum prints. His work addresses the “issue of natural beauty in the wake of human influence,” showing a “romantic beauty of nostalgia through discarded objects despite the contradiction of the potential ugliness of the subject.”

Orange has shown his works throughout the Northwest, and has had exhibits in New York, Los Angeles, Santa Fe and Atlanta. He is an Astoria resident.

For more information, contact OCCA Director Sally Houck at shouck@coastarts.org or by calling (541) 265-6569.

Bits and Pieces

Last week I shared with you my memories of an idyllic Christmas Eve in Korea. I noted how the war seemed but a distant memory after the beauty of the Mass in the little church, and the peace and tranquility of the countryside, bathed in the soft light of the full moon.

What I didn’t tell you was how quickly the reverie of the evening was shattered upon my return to our compound. There was a commotion coming from our admission area. Our interpreter, Yu Dai-shek, told me that a Korean man and his wife had just been brought in to the admission room, plus about five screaming children.

A Christian Korean family had gathered to celebrate Christmas Eve, when a crazed G.I. burst though the door, stabbed the father, then raped and stabbed the mother, all in the presence of the terrified children. The mother died, and the father was barely making it. One of our interpreters departed on a quest to find some relatives to help with the children.

That brought back the realization that the war was never far away, and its aftermath would remain with us for a very long time.

VFW Post 2848 recently changed its meeting day and time. The Post and its Auxiliary now meet the first Saturday of the month at 12:30 p.m. at City Hall. The next meeting will be January 5, 2013.

 

 

December 24, 2012

BAY CITY, December 24, 2012 --- It’s Christmas Eve, and I’d like to wish each and every one of you a very Merry Christmas and all that goes with it. Today, I’d like to start with a remembrance of a Christmas 62 years ago.

A Christmas Eve Long Ago

It was Christmas Eve, 1950. Most of the 1st Marine Division had been evacuated from the port of Hungnam in North Korea, and just a few contingents remained there to blow up any port equipment or other assets that could be used against U.S. forces as they completed their departure. My unit, A Company, 1st Medical Battalion, plus B and H&S Companies, were set up in a school compound on a hill overlooking Masan.

Father Reilly, our Catholic chaplain, had obtained permission from the local parish priest, a Korean, to celebrate Midnight Mass at his little church on Christmas Eve. The priest spoke little English, but he was fluent in Latin as were most Catholic priests of the day. The Korean priest, more than happy to make his little church available to the Marines who had defended Pusan and Masan six months earlier, asked only that his parishioners be welcome to join us at Mass.

Shortly after 11:00 p.m. on Christmas Eve, the devout began to assemble outside our compound. They came from all over Masan, Marines and Koreans alike. Somehow, someone had managed to locate a large number of candles, almost enough for everyone who came to attend the service. The air was still and the night clear and cold, but not oppressively so, quite unlike the nights up north. Our candles alight, the sounds of Christmas carols rising above the throng, our procession made its way slowly up the hill to the door of the little church. There, the Korean pastor welcomed us and threw open the doors, revealing the warm, inviting glow within. I turned for a moment, and looked back. Almost as far as the eye could see, the faithful with their flickering lights moved solemnly up the hill, the strains of their carols drifting over the peaceful countryside. Still singing, their candles still alight, they filed in, genuflected, and took their places in the pews on either side of the main aisle.

The throng soon overflowed the little church, and those outside gathered near the open door so that they, too, might participate in the worship. Fresh, green pine boughs, and white and red flowers adorned the altar and the crèche to one side. The church was ablaze with the soft light of hundreds of votive candles, and the air was pungent with the mixed aromas of incense, pine, and beeswax. I was to serve at Mass that evening, alongside a Korean altar boy, and I accompanied Father Reilly to the vestry to prepare for the service. From inside the vestry, we marveled at the blended sounds of Korean and English as the congregation sang "Silent Night" a cappella, as Franz Gruber had intended when he penned it one snowy Christmas Eve many years ago. Having forgotten most of my Latin responses, my role was to pour wine and water into the chalice for the Offertory and the water for the Lavabo, and to hold the paten for Father Reilly as he distributed communion.

It was a curious sight, the diminutive Korean altar boy in his cassock and surplice, and I, in my Marine Corps fatigues, towering head and shoulders above him. The Korean pastor, acting in the capacity of Master of Ceremonies at a High Mass, assisted Father Reilly as he said the Mass of the Nativity, the first of the three Masses a priest may say on Christmas. The Mass lasted almost an hour. Two brief sermons were given that evening, one in English by Father Reilly, the other in Korean by our gracious Korean host. The Mass concluded with the singing of "Adeste Fidelis," some singing it in Latin, some in English, and some in Korean.

We filed silently out into the clear, cold Korean night, the hamlet and valley below softly aglow in the pale light of the full moon and the millions of stars smiling down upon us, and, basking in an inner glow of peace and tranquility, we filed, quietly and contemplatively, to our bivouacs in the village below. The ordeal of the north had ended, and, for a very brief time, the war would be but a distant memory.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters will have their Christmas dinner at 11:30 a.m. Friday, December 28. Pat Vining told me he plans to serve ham and scalloped potatoes. Those attending should bring a side dish or a dessert. There will be a gift exchange for anyone who would like to participate. If you don’t want to take part in the exchange, simply don’t bring a gift. The Boosters would appreciate your bringing some canned goods to donate to the Food Bank. There are lots of people in Tillamook County who rely on the food bank, sad to say.

More Holiday Features

On December 16, I received a nice telephone call from Pastor David Hurd, of the Bay City United Methodist Church. They were caroling by telephone, a good idea in view of the miserable weather we’ve been having. The Fellowship Room at the church is a much more comfortable place to sing carols than on the dark, rainy streets of Bay City.

Christmas at the Fire Department

Our Bay City volunteer firefighters have long had a tradition of handing out candy and goodies to our children. On Saturday, Dec. 22, as Sharline and I were on our way to Downie’s to have breakfast with our daughter and son-in-law, I saw a fire truck starting on its appointed rounds.

Several hours later, as we were visiting with our daughter and son-in-law, there was a knock on our door. It was our fire chief, Darrell Griffith, with a candy cane for each of us. With the candy cane there was a small card reminding us of the importance of keeping fresh batteries in our smoke detectors and testing them regularly. The thing he likes best when responding to a house fire, Darrell told me, is to hear the smoke alarm beeping away and see the occupants safely outside.

Much of Tillamook County is served by volunteer firefighters, who give much, in terms of time and commitment, to keep the County’s residents safe and secure. Response to emergency calls is just a part of their commitment. Behind those emergency calls lie countless hours of training and preparation.

 

Tax moneys go only so far to support our volunteer fire departments, and many of them rely also on contributions from friends and neighbors to enable them to perform their many community services outside of responding to fires and emergencies.

The volunteer firefighters of Tillamook County, with the assistance of the Headlight-Herald, have created a 2013 firefighter calendar. These calendars are being sold at locations around the County to help support volunteer firefighter programs. For a mere $10 per calendar, you will be contributing to support a corps of dedicated volunteer firefighters throughout the County. You can pick up your calendar at the Bay City office. I did recently.

Veterans in Need of Firewood

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced at a recent VFW meeting, that there is a need for firewood for needy veterans. Anyone who has firewood to donate should contact the Veterans’ Service Office at (503) 842-4358.

 

Dinner at Downie’s Café

Downie’s Café is open for dinner Thursday through Sunday. Winter dinner hours are from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. This was effective starting in November. On Saturday evening, Sharline and I came down for the special that evening, meatloaf. It was outstanding.

When Sharline and I came to breakfast Sunday morning, the whole crew was there, serving breakfast and baking Christmas pies. Busy place.

Bay City Arts Center

Kathleen Kanas and Tom McCallum are the December Artists of the Month. Kathleen does amazing basketry, and Tom is a Tiffany style three-dimensional stained glass artist and a writer. His stained glass works include fish and animals, landscapes, seascapes and buildings, as well as Art Nouveau and whimsical creatures.

The January Pancake Breakfast will be held January 20, the third Sunday.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. The phone number is (503) 377-9620.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend.

If you’re looking for potential donations for this, the last month of the year, give some thought to the Arts Center. They can use things like paper, envelopes, file folders, tape, pens, and all the other office supplies that make it possible for BCAC to do the great things it does for Bay City and Tillamook County.

Art Happenings in Newport

The Oregon Coast Council for the Arts announced recently that the works of Clatsop County visual artist Darren Orange will be featured at the Newport Visual Arts Center starting January 4 and running through January 26. An opening reception will be held January 4 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Visual Arts Center.

Orange’s exhibit, entitled “AnteSeedent,” will include paintings and photo-based aluminum prints. His work addresses the “issue of natural beauty in the wake of human influence,” showing a “romantic beauty of nostalgia through discarded objects despite the contradiction of the potential ugliness of the subject.”

Orange has shown his works throughout the Northwest, and has had exhibits in New York, Los Angeles, Santa Fe and Atlanta. He is an Astoria resident.

For more information, contact OCCA Director Sally Houck at shouck@coastarts.org or by calling (541) 265-6569.

Bits and Pieces

On Sunday morning Sharline and I went to breakfast at Downie’s. We had just seated ourselves when our neighbors, Jack and Judith Irwin, came in and sat at the table by the door. Jack came over to our table and handed me a small plastic storage bag filled with miniature marshmallows. The card stapled to it said that, as my punishment for not behaving during the year, my Christmas present would have to be a bag of Snowman Poop. I asked whether it had been tested for coliforms.

Since I started this week’s issue with Korea, I’ll end with a little codicil to the story of my landing at Inchon on Sept. 15, 1950. All military operations are conducted with a high degree of administrative error. The side with the highest level of administrative error generally loses.

My company had been told that we would be going ashore on the 3rd or 4th wave, when everything would be secure. So, we had nothing to worry about. But, early on September 15, my boat was called off. “Third or fourth wave,” I thought to myself. “They were still bombarding the place until just a few hours ago.”

I clambered down the cargo net and into the waiting boat. We headed into the bay, circled around for a few minutes, and then made a run for the beach along with a lot of other boats. Our boat was the first one in, and the coxswain yelled at us to get off quickly because the tide was starting to recede. Two officers approached and asked whether we had the com wire. When our warrant officer responded that we had no such wire, that we were a hospital company, the air was blue with comments I dare not repeat here. Elements of Signal Battalion were supposed to have been sent ashore, not the staff of the division hospital, sans any medical equipment.

The ship had called off the wrong boats! We were told, in no uncertain terms, to hunker down in some shell craters along the beach and stay the hell out of the way! So much for planning.

VFW Post 2848 recently changed its meeting day and time. The Post and its Auxiliary now meet the first Saturday of the month at 12:30 p.m. at City Hall. The next meeting will be January 5, 2013.

 

December 14, 2012

BAY CITY, December 14, 2012 --- I was going to publish yesterday, but events overtook me and I couldn’t get it finished. So today I am publishing following one of the most wrenching news days I can remember. Our hearts, thoughts and prayers go out to all those folks in Connecticut who lost their innocent children in today’s senseless massacre. It is with a heavy heart that I write these lines tonight.

Planning Commission Vacancy

With the City Council’s appointment of Sara Charlton to the Planning Commission, I thought our ranks had been filled. But no, there is still a vacancy, and we’re still looking for an additional member.

If you’d like to be considered, please stop by the City Office and fill out an application. To be eligible, you must reside within Bay City or the Urban Growth Boundary.

Bay City Boosters

I drove by the red rock beautification area the other very dark night, and noted that the lights Jim and Kahna Henry had strung were not on. Later I heard Pat Vining commenting that he couldn’t figure how to get some holiday lights to burn. That reminded me of the Christmas tree lights in days of yore, when the lights were strung in series. You had to try replacing each bulb in turn to find the one that had burned out. That was a real pain.

My guess about the lights is that we haven’t had enough sunlight during these very short days to keep the lights burning at night. (But take heart. We have had the earliest sunsets of the year, and the sunsets will now begin occurring later each evening.)

But I digress. I really wanted to remind you that the Boosters will hold their Christmas dinner at 11:30 a.m. Friday, Dec. 28. Pat told me that he planned to prepare ham and scalloped potatoes, a refreshing change from the turkey, which is so ubiquitous at this time of year.

The Boosters won’t hold a regular meeting on the 28th. But they will have a gift exchange for anyone who would like to participate. If you don’t want to take part in the exchange, simply don’t bring a gift. But the Boosters would like to get some canned goods to donate to the Food Bank. That’s an outfit that gets hit pretty hard at this time of year. There are lots of people in Tillamook County who rely on it.

More Holiday Features

On December 16, don’t be surprised if your phone rings and there are carolers on the other end of the line. The Bay City United Methodist Church has come up with a much safer, much more comfortable approach to holiday caroling. They have instituted a program of tele-caroling. The carolers now gather in the Fellowship Room at the church to sing carols by telephone. Now, that sure beats wandering the dark streets in this miserable, rainy December weather to sing outside people’s houses.

Christmas at the Fire Department

Our Bay City volunteer firefighters have long had a tradition of handing out candy and goodies to our children. On Saturday, Dec. 22, starting about 9:30 a.m., our first responder vehicle and two fire engines will hit the road for their annual Candy Cane tour of the City. So, all you kids, both young and old, when you see that red truck coming up the road, get out there and get your Christmas Candy Cane, courtesy of the Bay City Volunteer Firefighters’ Association.

Much of Tillamook County is served by volunteer firefighters, who give much, in terms of time and commitment, to keep the County’s residents safe and secure. Response to emergency calls is just a part of their commitment. Behind those emergency calls lie countless hours of training and preparation.

Tax moneys go only so far to support our volunteer fire departments, and many of them rely also on contributions from friends and neighbors to enable them to perform their many community services outside of responding to fires and emergencies.

The volunteer firefighters of Tillamook County, with the assistance of the Headlight-Herald, have created a 2013 firefighter calendar. These calendars are being sold at locations around the County to help support volunteer firefighter programs. For a mere $10 per calendar, you will be contributing to support a corps of dedicated volunteer firefighters throughout the County. You can pick up your calendar at the Bay City office. I did today.

Veterans in Need of Firewood

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced at a recent VFW meeting, that there is a need for firewood for needy veterans. Anyone who has firewood to donate should contact the Veterans’ Service Office at (503) 842-4358.

Bay City Council

Kevin Greenwood, Manager of the Port of Garibaldi, visited the City Council at its Dec. 11 meeting to brief the Council on the status of Port structures and other matters. The Port, Greenwood said, is seeking funding for repair and upkeep of several seriously deteriorating Port structures. In addition, Greenwood is seeking support for repair and restoration of the South Jetty, not technically a Port responsibility, but vital for the health of Garibaldi’s vibrant commercial and charter fishing industries.

The main wharf, which houses a number of business and charter operations, is deteriorating badly and needs about $6M in work to bring it back up to standard. He could possibly do the job for a bit less, he said, but that would also limit the capability of the wharf. He has had to turn down applications of six businesses to locate on the wharf, because the wharf won’t support them.

A major concern, Greenwood said, is the South Jetty. In contrast to the North Jetty, on which construction was begun about 1911 or 1912, the South Jetty is of more recent origin, having been constructed in 1979. But it has lost more than 900 feet since that time, and is badly in need of repair. Responsibility for maintenance of the jetty system lies with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The Port of Garibaldi is asking Jo-Ellen Darcy, Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works, to seek an appropriation of $600,000 for fiscal year 2014 for engineering and final design for South Jetty repairs. The City Council voiced its support and authorized the mayor to sign a letter of support for the Port’s request. (In 2011 the total cost to repair the South Jetty was estimated to be $31 M, including the engineering and design work.)

Planning Commission Chair Terry Griffin spoke briefly to the Council about business licenses within the City of Bay City. Terry’s concern was primarily related to the construction and home repair industry. Bay City is the only city in Tillamook County, which has no requirement for a business license. The State of Oregon has certain requirements to license businesses engaged in building and repair services for homeowners. He pointed out that after the 2007 storm, the City was swamped with all sorts of people offering storm damage repair.

Many homeowners, Terry said, are unaware of the state’s requirements for contractors’ licenses, and are vulnerable to unscrupulous individuals and shoddy work. He asked the Council to consider enacting a requirement for business licenses for contractors to operate within the City. This, he said, would be primarily for the protection of our citizens.

Mayor Shaena Peterson’s first concern was, “how does this help businesses?” She added that the City is reinstituting a series of workshops to set out goals for the City, looking ahead 20 years. Terry’s request, she said, would be considered during this series of workshops, which would meet the fourth Tuesday of each month.

Public Works Superintendent David Pace submitted a written report stating that the Intertie with the Tillamook Water System is complete and has tested satisfactorily. Reimbursement from FEMA fell short of expectations, however. The Oregon Emergency Management Office has advised that certain pre-award costs could not be reimbursed because “they were not part of the pre-award costs that had been approved by FEMA.” The reimbursement shortfall comes to $18,029.19.

 

David also reported that Tillamook Estuaries Partnership is applying for a grant through American Rivers to do a feasibility study to replace culverts on Patterson Creek to allow better fish passage. David said the culverts at 7th and 8th Streets are in critical condition and badly in need of replacement.

David also reported that some work on the resurfaced sports court had to be suspended because of the rains, and that the asphalt plant had shut down for the season. Remaining to be done, he said, were installation of a Microdrain along the east fence and some finishing to the asphalt work.

The Council spent considerable time discussing proposed contracts and cost estimates for the City to perform meter reading and certain other work for the Latimer and Juno districts. The two volunteers who had performed these functions since the districts were incorporated are retiring at the end of the month. The Council made no decision at the meeting, and asked that certain amendments be made to the proposed contracts, which will be taken up again in January.

The Council accepted the resignation of Councilor Becky Smith, effective December 31. The vacancy will be filled by appointment in January. The Council also bade farewell to Pat Vining, who didn’t run for reelection. Pat plans to devote his energies to the new Watt Family Park.

  Emergency Preparedness

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith and the Emergency Preparedness Committee met December 12 to discuss the next steps to develop emergency response plans for the City. Darrell announced that the City Council, on December 11, had approved Resolutions 12-25 and 12-26, adopting the Committee’s proposed Emergency Operations and Continuity of Government Plans.

Darrell reported that he had activated the City’s Emergency Operations Center during the recent windstorm, as prescribed in the draft plan. Next, Darrell said, is the preparation of annexes covering common emergency situations such as flooding, windstorm and landslide.

Attending the meeting were Master Chief Mike Saindon, who commands the Tillamook Bay Lifeboat Station, and Gordon McCraw, the County’s Emergency Management Director. Discussion centered on availability of personnel during an emergency, noting that, if a major earthquake occurs, many people will not be able to report to work. Several Coast Guardsmen live in Bay City, but only two Public Works employees do. Mike and Gordon both live in or near Bay City.

Mike advised that his people have instructions to report to the nearest fire station if they are unable to reach the Coast Guard station. Mike also suggested holding a safety fair for Bay City, which could be done in conjunction with the Fire Department’s summer community picnic.

Also discussed were ways to get people interested in working on neighborhood safety issues. Gordon pointed out that the Map Your Neighborhood program in North County was a great success. Basic training in emergency operation procedures is also essential, he said. It is also essential that plans we develop facilitate interoperability between all agencies during an emergency.

Gordon and Darrell also noted that declaration of a disaster at the local level triggers a similar declaration by the County. In other words, the need for aid flows from the bottom up, not from the top down. The discussion also included drills to acquaint City staff and elected officials with operation of the Continuity and Preparedness plans.

Darrell passed out information sheets for the group to use when developing operation annexes to the basic plan. The Committee will meet again January 16.

Mission to Mexico

Sharline and I had the pleasure of having breakfast this morning with Karen Rust, who just returned from her mission to Mexico. She belongs to a group that helps support a school in a small town in the south, near Puerta Vallarta. On this visit, the group brought Christmas with them, including a large piñata shaped like Santa.

She said the folks there were very friendly, and grateful for all her group has done for their small community. Karen also commented on the local food. Their favorite food, she said, is dried shrimp, but everything was very good. In all, she said, the trip was quite an experience.

Now that she is back, she looks forward to some guitar jamming with none other than Gordon McCraw, a man of very many talents. Karen has been taking guitar lessons at the Church.

While Karen was away, I wrote her Fencepost column for Bay City. Seemed almost like old times.

Dinner at Downie’s Café

Downie’s Café is now open for dinner Thursday through Sunday. Winter dinner hours are from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. This was effective starting in November. Be sure to head for Downie’s some evening and chow down! And, if you want to order a Christmas pie, get your order in soon.

Bay City Arts Center

Kathleen Kanas and Tom McCallum are the December Artists of the Month. Kathleen does amazing basketry, and Tom is a Tiffany style three-dimensional stained glass artist and a writer. His stained glass works include fish and animals, landscapes, seascapes and buildings, as well as Art Nouveau and whimsical creatures.

The December Pancake Breakfast will be held December 16, which happens to be Beethoven’s birthday. So come down and help good old Ludwig Van celebrate his 242nd birthday.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. The phone number is (503) 377-9620.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend.

If you’re looking for potential donations for this, the last month of the year, give some thought to the Arts Center. They can use things like paper, envelopes, file folders, tape, pens, and all the other office supplies that make it possible for BCAC to do the great things it does for Bay City and Tillamook County.

Bits and Pieces

I had planned to publish this issue of the Back Fence yesterday, December 13. It was on that date in 1948 that I joined the Navy. I had dropped out of high school when my mother left Oregon in September of that year and took the family back to New York. My mother and father had separated two years earlier, when we moved to Oregon.

When I applied to several high schools, including the school where I did my freshman year, I couldn’t get back in as a senior. I wasn’t about to repeat my junior year, and took a job glazing custom storm doors and windows.

My dad didn’t like that arrangement one bit, and he took me by the hand to the Navy Recruiting Station on Church Street in Manhattan, where I joined up. His words to me were that, “we’re going to be fighting the Russkies in a few years, and I want you aboard a nice clean ship with three squares a day. I don’t want you slogging in the mud with the infantry.”

So where did I end up? I became a Hospital Corpsman and wound up with the 1st Marine Division, wading ashore at Inchon on Sept. 15, 1950. So much for the nice clean ship.

VFW Post 2848 recently changed its meeting day and time. The Post and its Auxiliary now meet the first Saturday of the month at 12:30 p.m. at City Hall. The next meeting will be January 5, 2013.

December 1, 2012

BAY CITY, December 1, 2012 --- We seem to have the weather hose pointed straight at us. This morning I dumped two and three-quarter inches of rain from my rain gauge. That’s a chunk of rain in 24 hours.

A Very Sad Note

Several months ago, Bob Wright, who, with his wife, Helen, owns The Landing, was taken to the Nehalem Bay Care Center for what would be a terminal condition. Helen informed me Friday at the Boosters meeting, that Bob had passed on Nov. 18.

Sharline and I extend our condolences to Helen and her family on Bob’s passing. I know this won’t make publication in time to let all of you know, but there is to be a celebration of Bob’s life at The Landing today at 1 p.m. Sadly, I’ll not be able to attend because of a conflict in my schedule.

A Happier Note

On November 30, Sharline and I became great grandparents for the umpteenth time. I’ve lost count. Little Kipling Dev was born to my granddaughter, Carmen Dev, at 11 a.m. in Portland. He weighed in at nine pounds one ounce. And, he had a head of curly black hair. I wish I had some of that.

Carmen and Kapil Dev were married in India two years ago, and are now living in Portland. They had a traditional Hindu wedding, with visits to various shrines over three days, to assure good luck and a happy marriage.

It Just Keeps Blowing

It looks like the winter season is here for keeps. It wasn’t too bad when I got up Friday morning to prepare for the Boosters meeting, but it certainly deteriorated during the day. It has been blowing and raining non-stop nearly all day, and, as I was writing these lines, we had a nice little thunderstorm.

I believe this was the first time my little Chihuahua has heard thunder, because she really barked up a storm. And, according to Gordon McCraw, we are due for some pretty heavy rains with the potential for flooding during the first week of December.

Like I say, it’s going to be a long, wet winter.

Planning Commission Vacancy

With the City Council’s appointment of Sara Charlton to the Planning Commission, I thought our ranks had been filled. But no, there is still a vacancy, and we’re still looking for an additional member.

If you’d like to be considered, please stop by the City Office and fill out an application. To be eligible, you must reside within Bay City or the Urban Growth Boundary.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters were pleasantly surprised at their monthly meeting Friday. Although a few members got tipped off in advance, most were surprised by the turkey dinner Pat and Linda Vining had prepared for the occasion. The Vinings prepared the turkey, and Patti and Fred Watson prepared the dressing. Jim Henry tipped me off early that morning, so Sharline and I brought some cranberry sauce made with Splenda.

We passed around a sympathy card for Helen Wright on the passing of Bob. Helen and Bob have made a great contribution to the community over the years they have owned The Landing. And, to ease everyone’s concerns, Helen told the members that she intended to keep operating The Landing. She let us all know that The Landing opens at 11 a.m. weekdays, but opens at 8 a.m. for breakfast on weekends. She quipped that she was keeping the restaurant because her daughter “needs a job.”

The Boosters have been busy during month of November. Members of the Beautification Committee have removed all the summer plantings from the “hay rack” window boxes around town, making them ready for holiday greens. They always do a great job.

If you should drive by the red rock beautification area at night, you’ll be pleasantly surprised by the lights Jim and Kahna Henry have strung on the “Welcome to Bay City” sign. Helen Wright had long pushed for some nice Christmas lighting to brighten up the town at this time of year. It’s just a little bit, but it’s a start. Maybe we can look for some more next year.

After considerable discussion, the Boosters agreed to hold their Christmas dinner on Friday, December 28. Usually, they meet early in December, but with the last Friday falling on the 28th, the decision was practically made for us.

It won’t be a regular meeting, president Linda Vining said. “We’ll just enjoy a nice dinner and have a gift exchange. If you don’t want to take part in the gift exchange,” Linda added, “simply don’t bring a gift.”

Pat Vining said later that he expects the dinner to consist of baked ham with scalloped potatoes. By that time, we should be pretty well fed up with turkey. Bring your potluck items to accompany the ham and scalloped potatoes, and show up about 11:30 December 28.

And, there are plans for the future. Helen Wright, several months ago, suggested holding a city-wide garage sale next spring or summer. Helen said the sale could be held in The Landing parking lot. There was some discussion about collection and storage of garage sale items, but mainly about when the event should be scheduled. Memorial Day weekend was suggested, but rejected in favor of July 4, which is on a Thursday next year. The weather is more likely to be better in July.

More Holiday Features

The Bay City United Methodist Church will hold a Christmas Bazaar, Bake Sale and Soup Lunch December 8. Then, on December 16, there will be tele-caroling at the church. Now, this is a relatively new feature. For the last couple of years, the carolers have gathered in the Fellowship Room at the church to sing carols by telephone.

Instead of wandering the neighborhoods in our foul weather, they decided it would be a lot more comfortable to stay indoors and call the carolees and sing to them over the phone. It’s lots more fun, too, Karen Rust advises.

Veterans in Need of Firewood

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced at today’s VFW meeting, that there is a need for firewood for needy veterans. Anyone who has firewood to donate should contact the Veterans’ Service Office at (503) 842-4358.

Landscapes: On the Wet Side

Dennis Worrel, a Tillamook artist, will have a showing of his work at the Newport Visual Arts Center from December 8 through December 29. There will be a reception for him Dec. 8, from 5 to 7 p.m. For further information, call (541) 265-6569.

Dennis is a landscape artist, specializing in Western Oregon scenes, especially the Coast Range. Through his landscapes, he says, he hopes to convey a “timeless sense of place where nature can exist in both experience and imagination.”

 

Bay City Planning Commission

The Planning Commission met November 28, a week later than usual, because of the Thanksgiving holiday. Although there were no land use issues to deal with, there were several issues in which most Bay City residents would be interested.

Last summer a complaint was filed with the City about use of undeveloped rights-of-way. One of the members photographed a number of undeveloped rights-of-way to visualize the range of uses to which these pieces of unused land have been put.

Public Works Superintendent Dave Pace researched what other cities have done and presented the Commission with the outline of a proposed addition to the Development Ordinance and Comprehensive Plan, which the Commission “approved in principal.”

No structures, whether temporary or permanent, would be permitted in undeveloped rights-of-way. A property owner would be allowed to plant and maintain shrubs or a garden to beautify an undeveloped right-of-way to its centerline. Dumpsters, portable toilets and like items would not be permitted. Property owners would be encouraged to mow and maintain their adjacent rights-of-way, but would not be required to do so.

Existing uses would be permitted to continue, provided the property owner/resident obtains a right-of-way permit. The features could be maintained and repaired, but the level of encroachment into the right-of-way could not be extended.

The matter will be referred to the City Council for its concurrence. If the Council concurs, the provisions will be added to the Development Ordinance and Comprehensive Plan with the next round of text amendments.

A second topic of discussion was code enforcement, which morphed into occupancy permits and construction standards. Following the 2007 storm, there was a veritable parade of “contractors” arriving in Bay City offering to repair storm damage. Some of these people were legitimate, but some probably were not. It was pointed out that Bay City is the only city in the county that does not require contractors to obtain City licenses. That makes Bay City a veritable Mecca for unscrupulous operators.

Planning Commission chair Terry Griffin plans to appear at the next meeting of the City Council to make the case for licensing contractors. Terry, a masonry contractor, fully supports the need for city licenses for contractors. Oregon law requires that anyone who works for compensation in any construction activity be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board.

This would be an annual license for anyone wanting to do construction, repair, renovation or improvement of properties. That would extend even to such things as lawn care. The licensing of contractors would create a revenue stream, which could be used for inspection services and code enforcement. I, personally, would prefer to see code enforcement carried out by someone other than the Public Works Superintendent, who has enough on his plate as it is.

Thanks to John Gettman, I have been provided a very handy brochure dealing with construction fraud and scams, which I intend to serialize over the next several months. There are lots of things we need to be aware of about construction fraud and scams. That is especially true for coastal communities, where we are more prone to severe storm damage than inland areas. We also have larger concentrations of elderly people, who are especially vulnerable to fast-talking scammers. So stay tuned.

Dinner at Downie’s Café

Downie’s Café is now open for dinner Thursday through Sunday. Winter dinner hours are from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. This was effective starting in November. Be sure to head for Downie’s some evening and chow down!

Bay City Arts Center

Kathleen Kanas and Tom McCallum will be the December Artists of the Month. Their reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1. Kathleen Kanas does amazing basketry, and Tom McCallum is a Tiffany style three-dimensional stained glass artist and a writer. His stained glass works include fish and animals, landscapes, seascapes and buildings, as well as Art Nouveau and whimsical creatures.

On December 7, the Arts Center will have an entry at the Festival of Trees at the Pioneer Museum. The Arts Center will have a special tree in the auction to be held at the event. Tickets are $20 if purchased in advance, or $25 if purchased at the door.

On December 12, the Arts Center will host its 12/12/12 Seafood Extravaganza and Auction to benefit BCAC --- to keep its programs going and growing. Call BCAC, (503) 377-9620, to make reservations. Tickets are $20 when purchased in advance, or $24 at the door. Children 12 and under eat for $12.

The December Pancake Breakfast will be held December 16, which happens to be Beethoven’s birthday. So come down and help good old Ludwig Van celebrate his 242nd birthday.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. The phone number is (503) 377-9620.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend.

If you’re looking for potential donations for this, the last month of the year, give some thought to the Arts Center. They can use things like paper, envelopes, file folders, tape, pens, and all the other office supplies that make it possible for BCAC to do the great things it does for Bay City and Tillamook County.

And, a great big welcome to BCAC’s newest Board member, Breeana Moran, who teaches art at Tillamook High School. Welcome aboard, Breeana.

Bits and Pieces

The deer haven’t deserted us yet. On Wednesday evening, as I was starting down my drive to attend a meeting of the Planning Commission, my headlights picked up a very young deer obviously wishing to cross the roadway. So, I slowed and stopped, to allow the little fellow to feel safe crossing my drive. It trod upon my drive very cautiously, but once across, it lost no time getting to its mama. She had been standing in my yard, gazing anxiously toward the drive, obviously concerned that her young charge might not make the crossing successfully.

VFW Post 2848 recently changed its meeting day and time. The Post and its Auxiliary now meet the first Saturday of the month at 12:30 p.m. at City Hall. The next meeting will be January 5, 2013.

November 24, 2012

Se

BAY CITY, November 24, 2012 --- it’s been an interesting ten days. Lots of bluster and plenty of rain. Happily, we didn’t sustain any damage, and my shingles seem to have weathered the storm. They better. The whole roof was replaced after the great storm of 2007. Some of my deck furniture got blown around, but nothing was broken. I’m glad I got my offset umbrella taken down. If I hadn’t, I would probably find it in Garibaldi. Hope all of you came through without any serious damage.

The Big Blow

I didn’t get much sleep the night of the storm because of all the banging and clanging going on outside. My birdbath got blown over, but nothing more serious than that. I’ll probably let it lie there until spring. It needed to be leveled, anyway.

We had four or five power blips but nothing long-term. But I still had to reset all my clocks. According to my rain gauge, I had three and one-half inches of rain within 24 hours. That’s a lot of water.

My daughter, who recently moved from Stayton to Rose Lodge east of Lincoln City, lost power and didn’t get it back until Wednesday. Sharline and I drove to Lincoln City on Tuesday for a doctor appointment, and witnessed the reason why my daughter was still in the dark. When we got to the junction of U.S. 101 and S.R. 18, we came upon a long line of cars. The delay was made extra long because of merging traffic from S.R. 18. It took 40 minutes to get to the flagger. Wires and power poles were down all over the place, and utility crews were hard at work setting poles and restringing wire. What a mess.

On our way back to Bay City late in the afternoon, the crews were still hard at work. This time it took only 20 minutes to get to the flagger. That’s progress. We didn’t have merging traffic to slow things down.

Planning Commission Vacancy

With the City Council’s appointment of Sara Charlton to the Planning Commission, I thought our ranks had been filled. But no, there is still a vacancy, and we’re still looking for an additional member.

If you’d like to be considered, please stop by the City Office and fill out an application. To be eligible, you must reside within Bay City or the Urban Growth Boundary.

Thanksgiving Dinner

As has been the case for a number of years, Karen Rust invited Sharline and me to share Thanksgiving dinner with her friends and family. The dinner was held in the basement Fellowship Room of the church.

Even the weather behaved itself. It had rained at least a part of the day Tuesday and Wednesday, but Thursday remained dry though cloudy.

This has become a very popular event. I was told that there were about 40 people in attendance. They had to put up some extra tables. Sharline prepared some of her cranberry sauce made with Splenda, for those who pay attention to such things.

There was a lot of food, a virtual cornucopia of goodies. We also brought some munchies for finger food, as well as a whole bag of Halloween candy. I had gotten a bag of Reese’s Pieces for Halloween treats, but no kids showed up. But, I’m sure some kids will get to finish them off after church on Sunday. At least Sharline and I don’t have them hanging around the house begging to be eaten.

Space doesn’t permit a litany of the food items laid out for our selection. The plates weren’t large enough to hold everything we wanted, which forced many people to return for seconds and thirds. There was an array of desserts you wouldn’t believe, lots of different pies, plus a few other epicurean delights. I probably should have waited a while to get my dessert, because the first slice of pie is the hardest to get out of the pan. But no matter how badly you mutilate a slice of pie, it doesn’t affect the taste one bit. I speak from experience.

Our thanks to Karen for inviting us to share Thanksgiving with her. We got to sit with our new neighbors, Gordon and Heidi McCraw, and got to know them a little better. It was truly a Thanksgiving to remember.

 

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters will meet at 11:30 a.m. Friday, November 30, 2012. All are welcome. Boosters members are asked to bring an auction item.

Dinner at Downie’s Café

Downie’s Café is now open for dinner Thursday through Sunday. Winter dinner hours are from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. This was effective starting in November. Be sure to head for Downie’s some evening and chow down!

Bay City Arts Center

Artist of the Month for November is Al Newcomb, who does photography and gel prints.

Tom McCallum will be the December Artist of the Month. His reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1. Tom McCallum is a Tiffany style three dimensional stained glass artist and a writer. His stained glass works include fish and animals, landscapes, seascapes and buildings, as well as Art Nouveau and whimsical creatures.

On December 12, the Arts Center will host its 12/12/12 Seafood Extravaganza and Auction to benefit BCAC --- to keep its programs going and growing. Call BCAC, (503) 377-9620, to make reservations. Tickets are $20 when purchased in advance, or $24 at the door. Children 12 and under eat for $12.

The December Pancake Breakfast will be held December 16, which happens to be Beethoven’s birthday. So come down and help good old Ludwig Van celebrate 242nd birthday.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. The phone number is (503) 377-9620.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend.

Bits and Pieces

We have all weathered the big blow. Happily it was not as big as Sandy back on the East Coast. That was really massive.

The deer seem to have returned. The day after the storm, I saw an elegant six-point buck ambling through my neighbor’s yard. It’s not often I see an animal with such a well-developed rack.

The following morning, I saw a very nice doe munching on my nice green grass as I drove down my drive to get my newspaper. Yesterday, Friday, I saw four young deer in my side yard as I left the house to pick up my mail. They were still there when I returned. Sharline and I really enjoy watching them.

VFW Post 2848 recently changed its meeting day and time. The Post and its Auxiliary now meet the first Saturday of the month at 12:30 p.m. at City Hall. The next meeting will be December 1, 2012. The Post and Auxiliary will also hold their Christmas dinner on that day, so come hungry. It will be a potluck dinner this year, so bring a dish to share.

Sharline and I hope all of you enjoyed a great Thanksgiving.

November 15, 2012

BAY CITY, November 15, 2012 --- I’ve done it again. Three weeks have gone by since my last Back Fence. But it’s been a very busy time. We were pretty busy getting the Veterans Day celebration put together, and then putting it to bed. I used to take that kind of stuff in my stride, but no more. All the work involved just plain wore me out. You don’t suppose my age could have anything to do with it, do you?

Slick Roads and Big Animals

The winter driving season has arrived like Gangbusters. We had a beautiful extended summer, and then, bang, we’re into winter. No transition.

I’ll pass along something I saw in The Oregonian. November is the month when we see the largest number of accidents involving wildlife. And, I learned from my friends in the Sheriff’s Office, that Bay City is the deer slaughter capital of Tillamook County. I read a piece in The Oregonian several weeks ago, that you don’t swerve when you see a large animal crossing the road. Use your brakes and hit the horn, and hope the critter gets out of the way. It’s better to take out one deer or elk, than a family in an oncoming vehicle.

It’s also time to slow down some, and allow more distance behind the vehicle ahead of you. You never know when that extra space might come in handy. And add this to the mix. If there is any standing water on the road, you risk hydroplaning. I’ve seen it happen. With sufficient speed, your tires will become water-borne. When that happens, you have no control whatsoever.

Planning Commission Vacancy

With the City Council’s appointment of Sara Charlton to the Planning Commission, I thought our ranks had been filled. But no, there is still a vacancy, and we’re still looking for an additional member.

If you’d like to be considered, please stop by the City Office and fill out an application. To be eligible, you must reside within Bay City or the Urban Growth Boundary.

Disaster Preparedness

Our Emergency Preparedness Committee met yesterday to review the two basic documents needed to make emergency planning work: A directive providing for Continuity of Governance under emergency conditions; and an Emergency Operations Plan.

With these items in place, the Committee will move on to develop annexes to deal with the more common emergencies we experience from year to year: High winds, power outages, flooding, and landslide. The Committee will also develop a budget plan to lay in and preposition certain essential supplies to help people survive an extended emergency. This phase of the planning is expected to extend over a period of several years.

The planning for the more common emergencies will help build a plan and preposition supplies for a megaquake and tsunami, which we can expect sooner rather than later.

Veterans Day

We had a great Veterans Day show at the Air Museum this year. The holiday this year was celebrated on Monday, November 12, because November 11 fell on a Sunday.

Participating in the program were the Community Band, which played before and after the show; the High School Chorus and Community Choir, which sang the service anthems for each of the armed services; Jon Dyk, who played Taps at the end of the program; and the cast of “Americana,” who performed the songs from the ‘40s segment of their July program at the T.A.P.A. Theater.

A special thanks goes to the members of the U.S. Coast Guard Honor Guard for posting and retiring the colors, and to members of the Clan Macleay Pipe Band, who put on a most impressive performance.

Col. Bill Hatton, USMCR, Ret., did an outstanding job as Master of Ceremonies. VFW Post 2848 Commander Jim Kenner, and Adjutant Donavan Goff, awarded plaques of appreciation to the Tillamook Air Museum, Diamond Art Jewelers, TLC Federal Credit Union and Denny’s Restaurant for their support of veterans’ programs.

Keynote speakers were Don Adams, a Navy Korean War veteran, and John Sollman, a Navy hospital corpsman who served with the 1st Marine Division in Korea.

The Air Museum served its traditional SOS Breakfast, a entrée for which all military personnel have the fondest memories.

Leading up to Veterans Day, Denny’s Restaurant, in cooperation with VFW Post 2848 and its Auxiliary Unit, posted Shining Stars honoring many individual veterans. Representatives of the Post and Auxiliary greeted customers at the door, many of whom posted the stars to honor their favorite veterans. I purchased stars to honor two personal friends: Richard DeWert, who was the first hospital corpsman to be awarded the Medal of Honor in Korea; and “Little Joe” Martinez, who was the first member of my company to lose his life in Korea.

The Friday preceding Veterans Day, the Post and Auxiliary hosted a veterans’ convocation at the Tillamook County Library. There were representatives of several agencies that help veterans on hand to answer questions and give out literature. The Post and Auxiliary thank County Librarian Sara Charlton for making the Hatfield and Copeland rooms available for the convocation.

A special note of appreciation goes to Linda Downey, Bay City Recorder, who sent Veterans Day cards to Bay City veterans.

 

Bay City Council

The City Council met Tuesday, November 13, for its regular monthly meeting.

The Council adopted a new City Parks Ordinance. The previous ordinance dealt with only a single park and contained a few items that cried out for improvement.

The new ordinance takes into consideration both parks: The Al Griffin Memorial Park, and the newly acquired Watt Family Park on Tillamook Avenue.

The earlier ordinance prohibited alcoholic beverages in containers larger than one-half gallon. But it didn’t limit the number of containers one could bring to the park. The new ordinance clears this up, and forbids alcohol in the area of the skate park.

Also at the meeting, the new director of Tillamook County Solid Waste Management made a presentation to the Council about the County’s plans for solid waste management in the coming years. The objective, he said, is to recycle or reuse as much as possible to reduce the amount of garbage that must be trucked to a landfill near Corvallis. New projects to put organic waste to use are in the County’s composting and digester programs that convert garbage to fertilizer or fuel. He also spoke of introducing curbside commingled recycling and programs to manage food and yard debris.

City attorney Lois Albright reported that the Pioneer Water District had been voted down, but added that there were about 25 votes in favor of the District. She said the matter could again go to the voters in the May 2014 primary election, and that more time should be allowed to put the measure together. Particularly important, she said, is to be sure that the bounds of the proposed district are accurately described.

Public Works Superintendent David Pace reported what it would take to pave and widen 6th Street to allow passage of emergency vehicles. He told the Council that the best that could be done would be to add a couple of feet in width, not enough to assure uninhibited passage of emergency vehicles. He recommended instead, that the City improve E Street and 9th Street for passage of emergency vehicles.

David also reported that the Intertie with the Tillamook Water System was tested and ready to go. The Council approved a revised Intergovernmental Agreement with the City of Tillamook governing emergency and non-emergency use of water.

Norm Hallowell appeared before the Council to note that the “Laemmert project” was not being maintained, and that alder and hemlock trees were again growing along the streets.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters will meet at 11:30 a.m. Friday, November 30, 2012. All are welcome. Boosters members are asked to bring an auction item.

Dinner at Downie’s Café

Downie’s Café is now open for dinner Thursday through Sunday. Winter dinner hours are from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. This was effective starting in November. Be sure to head for Downie’s some evening and chow down!

And, those wishing to order a Thanksgiving pie should get their orders in by November 20.

Downie’s will not be open on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 22.

Bay City Arts Center

Artist of the Month for November is Al Newcomb, who does photography and gel prints.

On November 18 the Arts Center will host its monthly All-You-Can-Eat Pancake Breakfast. Cost is $5 for adults, $4 for members. Kids eat for half price.

Tom McCallum will be the December Artist of the Month. His reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1. Tom McCallum is a Tiffany style three dimensional stained glass artist and a writer. His stained glass works include fish and animals, landscapes, seascapes and buildings, as well as Art Nouveau and whimsical creatures.

On December 12, the Arts Center will host its 12/12/12 Seafood Extravaganza and Auction to benefit BCAC --- to keep its programs going and growing. Call BCAC, (503) 377-9620, to make reservations. Tickets are $20 when purchased in advance, or $24 at the door. Children 12 and under eat for $12.

The December Pancake Breakfast will be held December 16, which happens to be Beethoven’s birthday. So come down and help good old Ludwig Van celebrate 242nd birthday.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. The phone number is (503) 377-9620.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend.

BCAC will be decorating a tree for the Festival of Trees at the Pioneer Museum. If you’re interested in helping with this, call the Arts Center and let them know. The festival date has not been announced.

Bits and Pieces

I’m happy to report that Halloween was really quiet around my place. Not one single goblin or ghost appeared at my door. Now I’m stuck with a great big bag of Reese’s Pieces that neither Sharline nor I dare eat. I didn’t try to foist them off on the staff at City Hall, because everyone down there is dieting. Bummer!

I’ve noticed that, with all the rain and the relatively warm temperatures the past few days, my grass has really started to grow. Looks like I will have to crank up the old mower the next dry day.

VFW Post 2848 recently changed its meeting day and time. The Post and its Auxiliary now meet the first Saturday of the month at 12:30 p.m. at City Hall. The next meeting will be December 1, 2012. The Post and Auxiliary will also hold their Christmas dinner on that day, so come hungry.

October 24, 2012

BAY CITY, October 24, 2012 --- Once again, I’ve been the victim of publication date creep. I started last week, hoping to get this published right after the October 18 Creamery meeting on the Pioneer Water District. So, here I am, late again. Mea culpa.

Slick Roads

The winter driving season has arrived like Gangbusters. We had a beautiful extended summer, and then, bang, we’re into winter. We’ve had some pretty cool temperatures the past couple of days, and it wouldn’t surprise me to see some of the white stuff in the mountain passes sooner rather than later.

So, it’s time to slow down a bit, and allow more distance behind the vehicle ahead of you. You never know when that extra space might come in handy.

Pioneer Water District

About 50 people attended an informational meeting hosted by Shawn Reiersgaard at the Creamery Oct. 18, to learn more about the proposed Pioneer Water District.

In his welcoming statement and introduction, Shawn made the jaw-dropping recommendation to “vote NO” on Ballot Measure 29-128, which, if passed, would create the Pioneer Water District.

Shawn was followed by Lois Albright, who repeated Shawn’s admonition to vote against formation of the Pioneer Water District at this time.

Lois described, in considerable detail, the error that occurred when the petition and ballot title were filed with the Clerk’s office and the Oregon Department of Revenue. The City of Bay City had helped prepare a list of the addresses outside the City and within the small customer districts that currently draw water from the Kilchis Regional Water District, omitting those in the Cole Creek district, which had opted out of the Pioneer Water District.

To complete the legal description of the District, the city engineering firm, SHN, and a surveyor, prepared a metes and bounds description of the proposed district, using the County’s “Walking List.” When the petition for the ballot measure was filed, only the metes and bounds description made it to the Oregon Department of Revenue, not the specific addresses that were supposed to be included in the Pioneer Water District.

Joan Kelsey brought the matter to the attention of the Bay City Council at its October 9 meeting, stating that many properties drawing water from wells had been included in the proposed district, and that some properties drawing water from the Kilchis Regional Water District had not been included.

The City set a special meeting for October 15, at which it adopted a resolution, essentially assuring that the City of Bay City would help in any way it could to rectify the matter and relieve properties inadvertently included in the district from any tax liability. This could have involved considerable expense to the City in out-of-pocket costs and employee time.

Lois stated at the October 18 Creamery meeting that the best and cheapest way to deal with the matter now was to vote the measure down. A letter has been prepared for residents in the Juno, Northwood and Latimer Districts urging a NO vote on the measure.

Assuming the measure is defeated at the polls, water will continue to be delivered pursuant to the contract establishing the Kilchis Regional Water District, which expires in 2021. However, those in the Juno and Latimer districts may expect to see their water rates go up in 2013. Clarence “Bub” Boquist and Bob Favret, volunteers who have managed the Juno and Latimer districts, respectively, have announced their retirements effective the end of this year. The services required by law, which they performed as volunteers, will have to be performed by a contractor.

While it was disappointing to the Creamery and all those who had worked hard to create the new district, the game is not over. It is planned to reintroduce the measure to be voted on in the May 2014 primary election. Although there will be filing expenses, much of the other basic spade work has been completed. It will be necessary only to bring the data up to date. And we’ll be doubly sure that the addresses to be included in the district are provided.

Planning Commission Vacancy

With the City Council’s appointment of Sara Charlton to the Planning Commission, I thought our ranks had been filled. But no, there is still a vacancy, and we’re still looking for an additional member.

If you’d like to be considered, please stop by the City Office and fill out an application. To be eligible, you must reside within Bay City or the Urban Growth Boundary.

Election Looms

It’s almost that time, and I can’t wait for the morning of Nov. 7, when we will be liberated from all those annoying political phone calls, mailers and TV advertising.

Ballots were mailed on October 19, and the ballot drop boxes around the county are open. You may deposit your ballot in a ballot drop box any time up to closing of the polls on November 6. If you plan to mail your ballot, be sure to do so on or before November 1. There is no guarantee that ballots mailed after November 1 will reach the County Clerk’s office in time to qualify.

I urge all of you to exercise your voting privilege. Your vote DOES count! Sharline and I had our completed ballots in the County Courthouse ballot drop box the morning of Nov. 19.

Disaster Preparedness

I had the pleasure of attending a preparedness town hall meeting at Pine Lodge in Manzanita last Thursday. Present were the Emergency Management Directors for Tillamook and Clatsop Counties. Also present were representative Deborah Boone, and Mark Labhard, of the Tillamook County Board of Commissioners.

Mark announced that Gordon McCraw had been named Oregon Emergency Management Director of the Year. Gordon has certainly been an outstanding Emergency Management Director, and he also provides the County outstanding weather forecasts along with all sorts of other very useful information.

Gordon said that the recent LIDAR mapping funded by DOGAMI had changed everyone’s perception of tsunami danger along the Oregon Coast. Basically, he said, we learned that the only real danger posed by distant tsunamis would be to beaches and waterfront structures. Moreover, for a distant tsunami, we will know from four to nine hours in advance to get off the beaches.

Gordon thanked the CAP for their support, and commented that, when the money ran out to pay for their flights, the pilots paid for the gasoline out of their own pockets. He referred to the CAP as our “siren in the sky.” The information provided by the LIDAR mapping makes sirens redundant for tsunami notification. It is now possible to notify everyone along the coast that a tsunami is expected, using the CAP and airborne loudspeakers. Gordon flew over the  Bay City area at our drill last May, and his announcements were so loud that I couldn’t hear the messages over the radio I was operating. He also commented on Reverse 9-1-1 and other notification modalities.

About floating debris from Japan, Gordon commented that there are two more of those docks floating around in the Pacific, and that winter winds could bring more of the Japanese earthquake debris ashore in Oregon.

Gordon and several others stressed the importance of having survival kits. He also recommended that everyone have an Emergency Go-Kit Passport containing information about your medications, immunizations, pets, and other family information, and urged everyone to get a battery-powered NOAA Weather Radio.

 

 

 

 

Mark stressed that when we experience the “big one,” everything will fail. We’ll have no bridges, no drivable roads, no power and no telephone communications. There will be no reliable water and no sanitary facilities. Many will be without shelter. And, these conditions will last for months.

He noted that Oregon is located on the so-called Ring of Fire. Severe earthquakes have occurred in Chile and then crept up the Western Pacific, from Indonesia north to Japan. It is logical to expect that the quakes will follow around to Alaska and then the Pacific Northwest. The 2007 rain and wind event gave us a foretaste of what to expect on a grand scale when the large subduction quake hits.

Linda Koslowski explained Manzanita’a preparations and its Map Your Neighborhood program. The program started in 2008, and 85 neighborhoods have been mapped so far. This is an excellent program to bring neighborhoods together, and bring back the spirit of neighbor helping neighbor, as was the norm a century ago. She also noted that her group has emphasized CERT training, and that presently she has 60 CERTs qualified.

Linda and several others noted the importance of HAM radio communications. It was noted during the evening that taking the course to get a HAM license didn’t teach a person how to be a proficient HAM operator. The advice given: Join a HAM club become a member of the Amateur Radio Relay League (ARRL), and ask lots of questions.

Other speakers spoke of the need for medically qualified people. Sanitation is a major concern when normal sanitary facilities are not available, and water supplies are of dubious quality.

Representative Boone explained the work that has been done on House Resolution 3, which she hoped to see make it through the Legislature during the next session. She said that eight subcommittees worked on drafting the language.

She said the State was looking at bonding authority of $2 billion to help do seismic retrofitting of public buildings to make them more resilient. She also commented on the fuel tank farm in Linnton, which would pose an extreme hazard during a major earthquake. The fuel would produce extreme contamination of soil and water, and pose a catastrophic fire danger. Loss of the tank farm would also result in loss of the area’s fuel supply. She hopes to see the tank farm broken up and decentralized.

Veterans Day

There will be several events leading up to Veterans Day.

Starting October 30, Veterans’ Stars will go on sale at Denny’s Restaurant in Tillamook. You purchase a Star in honor of your favorite veteran. Money from the Stars will go to veterans’ homes here in Oregon. When you come to eat at Denny’s, you may even be greeted by one of our veterans.

On Friday, November 9, from noon to 5 p.m., VFW Post 2848 and its Auxiliary Unit will host a Veterans’ Forum in the Copeland and Hatfield Rooms at the Tillamook County Library. Material will be presented on a number of subjects of interest to veterans. More on this later.

On Monday, Nov. 12, the VFW and Tillamook Air Museum will present the 16th annual Veterans Day celebration. More on this also in the next Back Fence.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters met Friday and heard Mayor Shaena Peterson speak on the Pioneer Water District and explain the filing error that resulted in the in the recommendation to vote NO on the measure.

Helen Wright suggested that the Boosters consider holding an open air garage sale during the summer, offering The Landing’s west parking lot for the event. She suggested that the rummage not be priced, letting the customers pay the price they thought to be fair.

Dinner at Downie’s Café

Downie’s Café is now open for dinner Thursday through Sunday evenings from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Thursdays, seniors get 10 percent off. Downie’s hasn’t yet decided whether to close at 7 p.m. after daylight savings time ends November 3. Stay tuned. Meanwhile, head for Downie’s some evening and chow down!

Bay City Arts Center

Hurrah, I’m back on the BCAC mailing list.

Artist of the Month for November is Al Newcomb, who does photography and gel prints. His reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, November 9. There will be complimentary refreshments accompanied by some guitar music.

Now why, you ask, are we not having the Artist of the Month reception on the first weekend of the month? That’s because BCAC is now into obscure birthdays.

So, come down November 2, at 7 p.m., to have a piece of CAKE and help celebrate the birthday of Marie Antoinette. BCAC is featuring music, poetry and cake. There will be several musical groups on hand to liven up the joint. Let them eat cake!

On November 11, there will be a program of traditional Irish music played by Dale Russ, Paddy O’Brien and Nancy Conescu. They will conduct workshops on the fiddle, accordion and guitar from 1 to 2:30. Cost of the workshop will be $20; pre-registration is required. Call (503) 368-2669 to register.

They will present a concert of Irish music starting at 6:30 p.m., admission $12 for adults, free for children under 12 if they are accompanied by a parent. But wait, there’s more. There will be a pre-concert dinner of Irish stew and soda bread. Suggested donation for the dinner is $5. Best you call (503) 377-9620 now to reserve your spot.

On November 18 the Arts Center will host its monthly All-You-Can-Eat Pancake Breakfast. Cost is $5 for adults, $4 for members. Kids eat for half price.

The December Pancake Breakfast will be held December 16, which happens to be Beethoven’s birthday. So come down and help good old Ludwig Van celebrate 242nd birthday.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. The phone number is (503) 377-9620.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend.

December Artist of the Month is Kathy Kanas, who has asked Tom McCallum to join her. They do 3D stained glass, and he is also an author. Date of the reception is to be announced.

BCAC will be decorating a tree for the Festival of Trees at the Pioneer Museum. If you’re interested in helping with this, call the Arts Center and let them know. The festival date has not been announced.

Also, BCAC wants to remind you to mark you calendar for December 12. That is the date for the big fundraising dinner. Tickets go on sale in November. Don’t miss it.

Bits and Pieces

It was a nice, long summer, but I’m glad to see the rains return. But not all at once and in such abundance.

The deer seem to be filtering back. We have seen them in our yard during the past several days. Sharline and I thoroughly enjoy them, though I know that some neighbors don’t particularly enjoy seeing them chewing up the gardens they have nurtured so lovingly over the spring and summer. But they are welcome in my yard any time. Sharline and I haven’s nurtured a garden for several years.

VFW Post 2848 recently changed its meeting day and time. The Post and its Auxiliary now meet the first Saturday of the month at 12:30 p.m. at City Hall. The next meeting will be November 3, 2012.

 

 

October 12, 2012

S

BAY CITY, October 12, 2012 --- I started this on Tuesday, figuring I could get it out by the 10th. Well, that didn’t work. Here it is the 12th already, and I’m just getting through it. How did you like our “gradual” transition to fall weather?

Summer Burning Restrictions

The rains are here, and the burn ban has ended. Today, the fire station sported a yellow sign, meaning burning in burn barrels only. However, Darrell Griffith, our fire chief, said the sign would probably go to green Saturday.

My rain gauge had accumulated three inches by 5 p.m. today. That’s some shower! But I had to ask Darrell, how are expected to burn with all that rain falling? Inquiring minds want to know.

Slick Roads

We’ve had no significant rain since June, so the roads have an accumulation of oil covering them. The first rains of the season generally produce slick roads, when the rain coats that accumulated oil. Water, itself, is a lubricant. On top of oil, it becomes a very efficient lubricant. So, a word to the wise. Drive carefully, especially going around curves. Try to avoid standing water, and reduce your highway speed when standing water conditions exist. And, when following, allow some extra room behind the guy ahead, in case he stops suddenly.

Watt Family Park

Between 50 and 60 people attended the dedication of the Watt Family Park last Saturday. Parks Committee chair Pat Vining, MC for the event, described the process of obtaining the grants and purchasing the land for the park. The park property had originally been the site of the Bay City elementary and high schools, but was ceded to the Neah Kah Nie School District during a consolidation of school districts during the ‘50s.

The property was originally acquired to provide a site for the fire station and city hall, out of the tsunami inundation zone. The land not needed for these facilities would then be used for a park. The City completed most of the paperwork for the purchase in April, but administrative delays prevented transfer of the title to the property until summer.

The City obtained a planning grant in January, and held a series of meetings involving the community to develop a plan for the park. But, owing to delay in transfer of title, the development grant the City applied for in March was not awarded during the last grant period. It had been hoped that the City would be able to start actual development of the park’s features this summer, but that will have to wait until next year.

 Mayor Shaena Peterson read a history of the many contributions the families of Robert and George Watt have made to the Bay City community, and City Planner Sabrina Pearson described the features planned for the Watt Family Park, City Recorder Linda Downey and Public Works Superintendent also offered some comments on the park.

There were many members of the George and Robert Watt families on hand for the dedication, and they all held a ceremonial red ribbon which Shaena cut with a very large pair of scissors, officially opening the park for our enjoyment.

Phyllis Wustenberg, on behalf of all members of the Watt family, thanked the City of Bay City for naming the park in honor of the Watt Family.

More Park News

David Pace reported last week that the tennis court has been surfaced and is nearly ready for general use.

As things turned out, Bayview Transit was not able to do the paving, so a contract was awarded to S-C Paving to do the job. Remaining to be done are installation of a micro drain system and boring holes for the posts to hold the tennis nets.

Mayor Shaena Peterson, at the October 9 meeting of the City Council, announced that she would like to install a final acrylic surface next year. She estimates that approximately $20,000 will be needed to do this. But, she emphasized, she doesn’t want to spend taxpayer money to do this. Instead, she said, she would like to hold several fundraisers. This, she said, enables Bay City residents to take ownership of the sports court, just as it did when the skate park was installed. There’ll be more on this later, as plans unfold.

It is also intended to remove the existing high fence around the tennis court and replace it with something more appealing to the eye.

Paving

One of my readers asked for an update on how our monthly $5 water surcharge for street paving was working out.

David reported that, in the five years he has been here, he has paved Spruce Street from Warren to Hare; 7th Street from Portland to Seattle; Seattle Street from 15th to Bewley; Bewley from Baseline to Tillamook Ave.; Baseline from 14th to Bewley; 14th from Baseline to E Street; Main Street from 5th to its westerly end; 2nd Street from Main to Trade; Hayes Oyster Drive from 5th to 4th; and some paving on McCoy.

David adds that the surcharge has made it possible to pave overlays on many roads, and he plans to have all roads currently needing overlays completed within five years.

Pioneer Water District

Voters in the proposed Pioneer Water District will vote on formation of the district this November. If approved by the voters, the new water district will replace the Kilchis Regional Water System now providing water to Bay City, the Creamery, Northwood Water District, Juno Water Company, Latimer Road Water Association and other customers outside Bay City presently receiving water from the Kilchis Regional System.

Earlier in the year, the City of Bay City developed a list of the addresses receiving water through the Kilchis Regional Water System as a basis for forming the new district. As directed by the Kilchis Regional Board, only those properties presently receiving water through the system were to be included in the Pioneer Water District.

At the October 9 meeting of the City Council, Joan Kelsey advised the Council that people using wells had been advised that they would be voting on formation of the Pioneer Water District. The following day, Steve Donovan of SHN Consulting Engineers provided city attorney Lois Albright preliminary confirmation that the properties included in the County’s Voter Walking List included all properties within the metes and bounds legal description provided the Oregon Department of Revenue, not just the addresses of current water customers as approved by the Kilchis Regional Water District Board. Simply stated, the proposed district, as submitted to the Department of Revenue, included people getting their water from wells.

Albright advised the City that she is looking at several different possibilities to rectify the matter and allow people who are not current water customers to withdraw from the proposed district. Another possibility, Albright wrote, is a declaratory judgment lawsuit in which the people who are not current water customers could be plaintiffs and request relief from formation of the district. Kelsey, who is an attorney, said she would be willing to be involved in such a proceeding if the City finds that this is the most acceptable alternative.

Albright provided the City a draft resolution addressing “the inadvertent inclusion of properties not currently served by City water in the legal description of the Pioneer Water District, should the electors approve its formation.” The proposed resolution states that the City will support withdrawal from the district of any property owner not currently served by City water; that the City will cooperate in any way possible regarding relief from any taxes assessed between formation of the District and withdrawal from the District; and if there is an alternate method to effectuate withdrawal of properties from the District, the City will cooperate however it can to have the withdrawal effective before July 1, 2013, when the new tax base goes into effect.

The City Council will hold a special meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday, October 15, to consider the Resolution and other alternatives to correct the error.

 

Other City Council Activity

Public Works Superintendent David Pace was out of town attending a training session, but provided a written report for the Council.

David reported that he had received the final pay request for the Intertie with the Tillamook Water System. Along with change orders, the final cost was $312,523.14, which is $2,885.86 under the bid price and under budget.

Two crossings of the Kilchis River remain to be bored. October 31 is the deadline for in-stream work, so the crossings won’t be bored until spring. Two companies have qualified to bore the Alderbrook Bridge crossing, and one company has qualified to do the Kilchis Forest Road Bridge crossing, which is technically more difficult. Negotiations continue with the qualified contractor for this crossing, to get a fair bid.

The City adopted Resolution 12-20 requesting that Tillamook County surrender jurisdiction and transfer ownership of portions of Warren and Doughty Streets to the City of Bay City. The transfer will enable the City to qualify for Special Cities Allotment Grants to repair and pave these Streets, along with Bewley Street, transfer of which has already been requested.

Councilor Robert Pollock reported that the Lommen Slip-n-Slide violation had been corrected and “is now history.”

The violation on 18th Street has been resolved, though by very unusual means. The City had contacted an individual to discuss abatement of the problem. This individual visited the property and discussed the abatement action with the resident, Bryan Lemon, telling him that if he didn’t clean up the property, the city would do it. David reported that when he visited the property a week later, it had been cleaned up and no further action was required.

The City received a report from the engineer of record and the geologist that the Bay Ridge violation had been satisfactorily stabilized. They reported also that they would monitor the property, especially after heavy rain events, in the event emergency repairs are necessary.

The Council also reviewed a proposed Parks Ordinance and set a public hearing for the November meeting.

David reported that the owner of a property at the corner of 15th Street and Baseline has removed a fence that had obscured clear vision at that corner.

The Council granted relief to two water customers who had been billed for excess water use due to leaks. In one case the excess amount totaled $303.95, and, in the other, $810.30.

In his report to the Council, David recommended that the Public Works and Streets Committees meet jointly to consider recommending realignment of intersections with U.S. 101 as recommended in the City’s Transportation System Plan. This recommendation was made pursuant to ODOT’s recent announcement of revisions in the State Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP).

Planning Commission Vacancy

With the City Council’s appointment of Sara Charlton to the Planning Commission, I thought our ranks had been filled. But no, there is still a vacancy, and we’re still looking for an additional member.

If you’d like to be considered, please stop by the City Office and fill out an application. To be eligible, you must reside within Bay City or the Urban Growth Boundary.

Election Looms

It’s almost that time, and I can’t wait for the morning of Nov. 7, when we will be liberated from all those annoying political phone calls and TV advertising.

October 16 is the deadline to register to vote, if you’re not already registered. Registration cards postmarked October 16 will be valid.

Ballots will be mailed on October 19, and the ballot drop boxes around the county will be opened on that day. You may deposit your ballot in a ballot drop box any time up to closing of the polls on November 6. If you plan to mail your ballot, be sure to do so on or before November 1. There is no guarantee that ballots mailed after November 1 will reach the County Clerk’s office in time to qualify.

I urge all of you to exercise your voting privilege. Your vote DOES count!

Urgent Needs

Melonie Ferguson, who coordinates Tillamook’s Family and Youth Services Team for the Tillamook Family Counseling Center advises that there are two pressing needs as the fall weather finally makes an appearance.

Many families will be in need of firewood this fall and winter.

Five single beds are needed for four families. Double beds won’t do because of space limitations. It is important that the children not have to sleep on the floor as the colder weather sets in.

Any contributions you make in kind will be tax deductible. If you can help out, give Melonie a call at (503) 842-8201, extension 215.

Firewood

Brett Bertrand contacted me several weeks ago about firewood for needy folks. If you know a needy family, give Brett a call at (503) 812-2962.

Dinner at Downie’s Café

Downie’s Café is now open for dinner Thursday through Sunday evenings from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Thursdays, seniors get 10 percent off. Downie’s hasn’t yet decided whether to close at 7 p.m. after daylight savings time ends November 3. Stay tuned. Meanwhile, head for Downie’s some evening and chow down!

Bay City Arts Center

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. The phone number is (503) 377-9620.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend.

On October 21, the Arts Center will host its monthly All-You-Can-Eat Pancake Breakfast. Cost is $5 for adults, $4 for members. Kids eat for half price.

BCAC will be decorating a tree for the Festival of Trees at the Pioneer Museum. If you’re interested in helping with this, call the Arts Center and let them know. The festival date has not been announced.

Also, BCAC wants to remind you to mark you calendar for December 12. That is the date for the big fundraising dinner. More on this later.

Bits and Pieces

Looks like fall is upon us. No transition. Just rain. And more rain. My rain gauge, at 5 p.m. today, read three inches. That’s a shower?

At least we can start burning our accumulated burnable trash. I’ve been dying to see how my new burn barrel works.

It was a nice, long summer, but I’m glad to see the rains return. But not all at once.

VFW Post 2848 recently changed its meeting day and time. The Post and its Auxiliary now meet the first Saturday of the month at 12:30 p.m. at City Hall. The next meeting will be November 3, 2012.

October 4, 2012

S

BAY CITY, October 4, 2012 --- Due to a glitch in my software, I’m having to ship my Back Fence articles off to my daughter in Lincoln City to post for me. I’m lucky to have someone to fill in for me when these kinds of things happen to me. I must confess, I used to be fairly good with computer stuff, but no more. Computer technology has advanced so rapidly that it has left me in the dust. I guess that’s the price of getting old. I made the mistake of not staying young.

Summer Burning Restrictions

All outdoor burning is still prohibited. I had hoped it would have ended long ago, but no such luck. We continue to be cursed by this glorious late-summer/early-fall weather. I think we should pray for a good shot of rain so they will call off the burn ban. Gordon’s weather forecast Monday provided a list of forest restrictions --- Levels II and III --- and I haven’t the foggiest notion what he is talking about. Since use of any tool that might produce a spark is verboten, I would assume that the fire guys wouldn’t be exactly happy with an open flame.

Watt Family Park

Watt Family Park will be formally dedicated on Saturday, October 6, at 11 a.m. It’s quite possible that a soccer game will be in progress during the dedication, and that’s what the park is all about. Members of the Watt family will be on hand for the event.

Although we didn’t receive the grant to develop the park this year, it is still ours to enjoy. The YMCA will be using the park during the fall for their soccer program, so we’re off to a good start.

The City Council approved an agreement with the Tillamook Family YMCA, giving them use of the park Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3 to 8 p.m., and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The agreement runs from September 11 through November 1.

More Park News

It’s been a long wait, but it’s finally happening. I drove by the downtown city park yesterday and saw that the tennis court was sporting a great-looking asphalt playing surface.

This has been several years in the making. I don’t know how long ago it was that we were collecting tennis shoes to be ground up into Nikegrind, a proprietary outdoor sports court surfacing material. It had been our intention to apply for a grant from Nike to surface the tennis court.

Things went awry at some point along the line, because nothing happened. But it turned out to be providential. Last year we got a grant from the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department to resurface the sports court. Upon removal of the old asphalt surface, which was buckled in several spots, it was discovered that there were several springs underneath. A new surface would ultimately suffer the same fate.

Our city engineers and a geologist evaluated the problem and worked out a solution, which took quite a bit of digging and installation of drainpipe. That work was completed earlier in the summer. But the unfinished sports court took a back seat when an urgent situation arose elsewhere, which demanded the full attention of our engineers and public works staff.

But finally, in September, David Pace was able to turn his attention back to the park. The work was again put out to bid. Bayview Transit, which has had experience resurfacing outdoor sports courts, agreed to do the work for the $18,000 they bid last year. The City Council authorized an additional $2,500 to have Bayview Transit level and grade the tennis court.

I don’t know whether another asphalt lift is to be laid down. And, of course, there remains the finishing work such as the striping and installation of the nets. Dave assured that the unsightly old fencing would be replaced with something much more suitable. But it sure looks good!

Planning Commission Vacancy

With the City Council’s appointment of Sara Charlton to the Planning Commission, I thought our ranks had been filled. But no, there is still a vacancy, and we’re still looking for an additional member.

If you’d like to be considered, please stop by the City Office and fill out an application. To be eligible, you must reside within Bay City or the Urban Growth Boundary.

The Ilwaco Opera Company

Sharline and I had the pleasure Sunday of attending the performance of a little chamber opera at the Ilwaco Playhouse. We enjoyed a beautiful drive up and back, and, happily, encountered no construction delays along the way.

The opera, “Rumpelstiltskin,” was written by two friends, Bob and Wilma Francovich, for performance by a small orchestra and cast of players. It was a musical rendition of the classic Grimm fairy tale, with a definitely comical bent. Two of the singers particularly stood out, a baritone and a soprano, who had fine operatic voices.

Bob wrote the music and did the musical preparation of the orchestra and cast, and Wilma wrote the libretto, or book. In lay parlance, you’d call it a script. And I must say, the writing was superb.

After the performance, I put a bug in Wilma’s ear to consider bringing the performance to the Tillamook area. We have two fine venues in which to mount a production: the T.A.P.A. playhouse, and the Bay City Arts Center.

And, this was the first opportunity Sharline and I have had this summer to take a nice trip solely for our own enjoyment.

 

Prescription Drug Disposal Program

Remember, please don’t dispose of unused over-the-counter and prescription drugs in the toilet or the garbage can. What each of us dumps may be a very small amount, but when considered collectively --- what all of us might dump --- we’re dealing with a huge volume. We don’t want that in our drinking water, and we don’t want to eat fish that have accumulated that stuff in their systems.

So, when you want to dispose of unwanted prescription or over-the-counter drugs, please take them to one of the disposal points listed below.

The Sheriff’s Office on Long Prairie Road, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week.

The Tillamook Police Department, located at 207 Madrona Ave., from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday though Friday.

The Manzanita Police Department at 165 S. Fifth Street, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven days a week. Residents are asked to call (503) 368-7229 before coming in.

Liquids must be in sealed containers. The program accepts pills, tablets, capsules, gels, liquids, ointments or creams, preferably in their original containers.

The program does NOT accept IV bags, syringes, sharps, thermometers, hydrogen peroxide, aerosol cans, inhalers, or blood-contaminated materials.

It is recommended that you black out personal information on any containers you turn in.

Election Looms

It’s almost that time, and I can’t wait for the morning of Nov. 7, when we will be liberated from all those annoying political phone calls and TV advertising.

October 16 is the deadline to register to vote, if you’re not already registered. Registration cards postmarked October 16 will be valid.

Ballots will be mailed on October 19, and the ballot drop boxes around the county will be opened on that day. You may deposit your ballot in a ballot drop box any time up to closing of the polls on November 6. If you plan to mail your ballot, be sure to do so on or before November 1. There is no guarantee that ballots mailed after November 1 will reach the County Clerk’s office in time to qualify.

I urge all of you to exercise your voting privilege. Your vote DOES count!

 

Firewood

Brett Bertrand contacted me several weeks ago about firewood for needy folks. If you know a needy family, give Brett a call at (503) 812-2962.

Dinner at Downie’s Café

Downie’s Café is now open for dinner Thursday through Sunday evenings from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Thursdays, seniors get 10 percent off. Sharline and I had a great steak dinner there a week ago Thursday. Downie’s hasn’t yet decided whether to close at 7 p.m. after daylight savings time ends November 3. Stay tuned. Meanwhile, head for Downie’s some evening and chow down!

Bay City Arts Center

The October Artist of the Month has not yet been announced. According to Dia Norris, Arts Center president, they are awaiting confirmation. Assuming there will be an artist of the month for October, the reception will be held at 5 p.m. Saturday, October 6.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. The phone number is (503) 377-9620.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend.

On October 21, the Arts Center will host its monthly All-You-Can-Eat Pancake Breakfast. Cost is $5 for adults, $4 for members. Kids eat for half price.

BCAC will be decorating a tree for the Festival of Trees at the Pioneer Museum. If you’re interested in helping with this, call the Arts Center and let them know. The festival date has not been announced.

Also, BCAC wants to remind you to mark you calendar for December 12. That is the date for the big fundraising dinner. More on this later.

Bits and Pieces

It’s fall, but who would know it? This has been an unusually long dry spell. And, according to today’s Oregonian, there is no rain in sight. At least we should be able to take comfort that we probably won’t have a Columbus Day storm this year. But the weather during the day certainly is nice.

But it’s getting cold at night. Dan Weber, our local ODOT manager, said his vehicle was frozen shut this morning in Tillamook. The frost is coming, so we would all be well advised to take in our potted plants.

VFW Post 2848 recently changed its meeting day and time. The Post and its Auxiliary now meet the first Saturday of the month at 12:30 p.m. at City Hall. The next meeting will be October 6, 2012.

 

September 29, 2012

S

BAY CITY, September 29, 2012 --- You will forgive me, but I’m still having problems with publication date creep. I figure I’m going to publish on a certain day, and then some hotter brush fire gets in the way. So then I have to go through the material and correct all the date references. But there’s not that much new this week.

Summer Burning Restrictions

All outdoor burning is still prohibited. I had hoped it would have ended by now. My awaiting burn pile is getting pretty big, and from the forecast in the newspaper, it looks to be at least another week before we get some rain. But be patient, nothing is forever. And soon, I would surmise, we’ll be wishing the rain would quit so we can burn.

Cutting Loose Salon

Sharline and I recently paid a visit to our friend, Heather, at her Cutting Loose Salon. We hadn’t been there for many months, as evidenced by the curly grey hair growing down the back of my neck. I can’t understand why it can’t be growing on the top of my head, where it belongs.

I admit to the prolonged hiatus between tonsorial visits, because Sharline and I found the whole place changed around. Heather said she changed the place in March. That’s a whole six months ago! I can’t believe I had gone that long between haircuts.

Heather has always been a person of impeccable taste, and her Cutting Loose Salon has always epitomized that. Her first salon in the old Mexican restaurant building was very tastefully appointed. The problem with that place was that the popularity of Cutting Loose grew very quickly, and soon there was not enough space for all the operators needed to satisfy the demand.

Heather bought the old fish retail outlet at the corner of McCoy Street and U.S. 101. The place went through several iterations as more work stations were added and new fixtures purchased.

We found the salon completely reorganized when Sharline and I visited it recently. The front area, where most of the work stations had been, is now a most attractive boutique. Heather has women’s bags, accessories and jewelry, all very attractively displayed. There is new, comfortable furniture where customers await their turns at getting their locks trimmed.

Most of the work stations are now in the back area, completely refinished and bright as a new dime. Heather has always had a flair for tasteful and welcoming design.

If you haven’t checked it out, it’s a high time you got down there. You’ll like it. Guaranteed!

Watt Family Park

Watt Family Park will be formally dedicated on Saturday, October 6, at 11 a.m. It’s quite possible that a soccer game will be in progress during the dedication, and that’s what the park is all about. Members of the Watt family will be on hand for the event.

Although we didn’t receive the grant to develop the park this year, it is still ours to enjoy. The YMCA will be using the park during the fall for their soccer program, so we’re off to a good start.

The City Council approved an agreement with the Tillamook Family YMCA, giving them use of the park Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3 to 8 p.m., and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The agreement runs from September 11 through November 1.

Planning Commission Vacancy

With the City Council’s appointment of Sara Charlton to the Planning Commission, I thought our ranks had been filled. But no, there is still a vacancy, and we’re still looking for an additional member.

If you’d like to be considered, please stop by the City Office and fill out an application. To be eligible, you must reside within Bay City or the Urban Growth Boundary.

 

Prescription Drug Disposal Program

Remember, please don’t dispose of unused over-the-counter and prescription drugs in the toilet or the garbage can. What each of us dumps may be a very small amount, but when considered collectively --- what all of us might dump --- we’re dealing with a huge volume. We don’t want that in our drinking water, and we don’t want to eat fish that have accumulated that stuff in their systems.

So, when you want to dispose of unwanted prescription or over-the-counter drugs, please take them to one of the disposal points listed below.

The Sheriff’s Office on Long Prairie Road, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week.

The Tillamook Police Department, located at 207 Madrona Ave., from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday though Friday.

The Manzanita Police Department at 165 S. Fifth Street, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven days a week. Residents are asked to call (503) 368-7229 before coming in.

Liquids must be in sealed containers. The program accepts pills, tablets, capsules, gels, liquids, ointments or creams, preferably in their original containers.

The program does NOT accept IV bags, syringes, sharps, thermometers, hydrogen peroxide, aerosol cans, inhalers, or blood-contaminated materials.

It is recommended that you black out personal information on any containers you turn in.

Firewood

Brett Bertrand contacted me several weeks ago about firewood for needy folks. If you know a needy family, give Brett a call at (503) 812-2962.

Dinner at Downie’s Café

Downie’s Café is now open for dinner Thursday through Sunday evenings from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Thursdays, seniors get 10 percent off. Sharline and I had a great steak dinner there a week ago Thursday. Downie’s hasn’t yet decided whether to close at 7 p.m. after daylight savings time ends November 3. Stay tuned. Meanwhile, head for Downie’s some evening and chow down!

Bay City Arts Center

The October Artist of the Month has not yet been announced. According to Dia Norris, Arts Center president, they are awaiting confirmation. Assuming there will be an artist of the month for October, the reception will be held at 5 p.m. Saturday, October 6.

Discovery in Stone, Part 2, is now going on at the Arts Center. The three-day stone-carving workshop runs from Sept. 29 through Oct. 1, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day.

Lunch during the workshop will be potluck, with coffee, tea and juice provided by BCAC.

Yoga classes resumed Thursday, September 20, and will be held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. The phone number is (503) 377-9620.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions will resume in October. Classes will be held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend.

On October 21, the Arts Center will host its monthly All-You-Can-Eat Pancake Breakfast. Cost is $5 for adults, $4 for members. Kids eat for half price.

BCAC will be decorating a tree for the Festival of Trees at the Pioneer Museum. If you’re interested in helping with this, call the Arts Center and let them know. The festival date has not been announced.

Also, BCAC wants to remind you to mark you calendar for December 12. That is the date for the big fundraising dinner. More on this later.

Bits and Pieces

Last issue I announced that Sharline and I were about to become great grandparents for the umpteenth time. Well, it happened. Welcome to the world, Elijah Daniel Gray, born Sept. 25 at 4:50 p.m. in Kansas. Tony Gray, the father, is stationed at Fort Leavenworth. Elijah weighed in at eight pounds six ounces and is 20.25 inches long. If memory serves, I have a granddaughter whose birthday is Sept. 25. I can’t keep track of them all. But I do remember that Luci, Elijah’s mother, was born on the 4th of July.

And, I have another great grandson who is due in November. When that happens, I expect to see a pair of proud grandparents come from India to greet their grandson. Many of you will remember that my daughter traveled with my granddaughter to India two years ago to get the young lady hitched at a traditional Hindu wedding ceremony. They do it up big over there, with three days of visits to various temples and lots of family celebrating.

VFW Post 2848 recently changed its meeting day and time. The Post and its Auxiliary now meet the first Saturday of the month at 12:30 p.m. at City Hall. The next meeting will be October 6, 2012.

 

September 17, 2012

S

BAY CITY --- I keep starting this thing, but never quite finishing it. So, I'm subjected to publication date creep. Whenever I move up a day, I must go through what I've written and bring all my time references back into context. So, if I've missed few, please cut me some slack.

School's in Session

Just a quick reminder. Schools are back in session. Remember to watch for little children waiting for their school bus. The older kids know the drill, but the kids going to school for the first time may not know not to run out into the street.

And remember, it's 20 mph through school zones. I recall a highway sign outside the city of St. Regis, Montana: "We have lots of kids, but none to spare." Keep that in mind when driving in a school zone, or where kids are getting on or off the school bus.

Summer Burning Restrictions

All outdoor burning is still prohibited. I had hoped it would have ended by now, but with the weather forecasts calling for continued sunny weather, it looks like barrel burning is still a week away, if not longer. But be patient, nothing is forever.

St. Mary's Silent Auction

Dia Norris advises that St. Mary's by the Sea Catholic Church will hold a silent auction to support the work of CARE, which serves needy people throughout the County.

The Auction starts Saturday, Sept. 22, from 5 to 7 p.m. in the parish hall, and will close Sunday, Sept. 23, during the potluck, which will be held from noon to 2 p.m. For information and/or donation of auction items, call JoAnn at the parish office, 503-355-1661, or Dia Norris at 503-842-9866.

The auction and potluck are part of the church's annual Feast Day Celebration. The public is invited to share in the festivities.

Watt Family Park

Watt Family Park will be formally dedicated on Saturday, October 6, at 11 a.m. It's quite possible that a soccer game will be in progress during the dedication, and that's what the park is all about.

Although we didn't receive the grant to develop the park this year, it is still ours to enjoy. The YMCA will be using the park during the fall for their soccer program, so we're off to a good start.

The City Council approved an agreement with the Tillamook Family YMCA, giving them use of the park Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3 to 8 p.m., and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The agreement runs from September 11 trough November 1.

I'll have more on the park dedication next week.

Planning Commission Vacancy

With the City Council's appointment of Sara Charlton to the Planning Commission, I thought our ranks had been filled. But no, there is still a vacancy, and we're still looking for an additional member.

If you'd like to be considered, please stop by the City Office and fill out an application. To be eligible, you must reside within Bay City or the Urban Growth Boundary.

National Child Passenger Safety Week

September 16 – 22 is National Child Passenger Safety Week. Motor vehicle crashes are the major cause of death for children age three or older. If you parents of young children have not yet done so, I suggest you attend a car seat CHECKUP event.

To find out where a CHECKUP event is occurring near you, visit www.childsafetyseat.org. Click on the calendar prompt.

Parking Update

I am pleased to report that our Public Works crew has been marking driveway locations on 5th Street. If you see a crosshatched area painted on the street, don't park there. It marks the end of a driveway.

Emergency Preparedness

The Emergency Preparedness Committee met Wednesday, Sept. 12, to review a draft Continuity of Governance Plan, and an Emergency Operations Plan to be in effect during the emergency period.

ORS 401.305 authorizes cities to "establish an emergency management agency which shall be directly responsible to the executive officer or governing body of the ... city." With authority existing in state law, Fire Chief Darrell Griffith explained, it would not be necessary to amend the City Charter, which would require a vote of the people.

ORS 401.309, a companion statute, prescribes how emergencies are declared.

ORS 401.032 and .035 place responsibility on the local jurisdiction to prepare an Emergency Operations Plan, and to declare an emergency when conditions warrant. It is important to note that declaration of an emergency works from the bottom up, not from the top down. When Bay City declares an emergency, the County emergency operations plan is automatically activated, and remains so until Bay City's emergency has ended.

Bay City's most recent emergency, the December 2007 storm that left most of the City without power for six days, was never declared by the City. There was valiant informal response by the Fire Department, the Arts Center and the American Red Cross. Becky Smith noted that, living in the Goose Point area, her home is on the same electric grid as the hospital. Her lights were on within a day. When services were restored to the hospital, Darrell said, the County emergency operation shut down. But the rest of Bay City, and most of North County, would be in the dark for a few more days.

Had Bay City declared an emergency, Darrell added, emergency operations at the County level would have continued until Bay City's emergency was resolved.

Both draft plans, as they stand, contain all the elements needed to declare an emergency and activate an Emergency Operations Center. Darrell is certainly to be commended for the hard work he has put in to develop the draft plans and bring them to the state where they can be implemented if need be.

One more thing needs saying. To date, we have expended our energies toward developing a plan to harden city resources to withstand a catastrophic event: A megathrust subduction earthquake and tsunami. We have given lip service to the lesser events that occur more frequently: Severe winter storms, landslides, flooding, crustal and deep earthquakes.

As the City's plans develop, there will be brief, succinct annexes dealing with these more common emergencies, and the conditions reasonably expected to arise as a result. Stay Tuned.

Prescription Drug Disposal Program

Last week I published the article on Prescription Drug Disposal. That article contained an error. I had stated that Garibaldi had a drug collection site. I m reliably informed that it does not. Corrected information is repeated below.

Earlier in the year, the Sheriff's Office collected unused prescription drugs for disposal. Traditionally, we've been accustomed to disposing of unused prescription drugs by tossing them in the garbage or flushing them down the toilet.

Both methods of disposal are bad ideas, because the drugs will eventually find their way into the ecosystem.

For the convenience of County residents, the Sheriff's Office now offers an ongoing prescription drug take-back program. Unused prescription drugs may be turned in at the following locations and times:

The Sheriff's Office on Long Prairie Road, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week.

The Tillamook Police Department, located at 207 Madrona Ave., from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday though Friday.

The Manzanita Police Department at 165 S. Fifth Street, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven days a week. Residents are asked to call (503) 368-7229 before coming in.

The above locations accept unused or expired prescription medications and over-the-counter drugs. Liquids must be in sealed containers. The program accepts pills, tablets, capsules, gels, liquids, ointments or creams, preferably in their original containers.

The program does NOT accept IV bags, syringes, sharps, thermometers, hydrogen peroxide, aerosol cans, inhalers, or blood-contaminated materials.

It is recommended that you black out personal information on any containers you turn in.

If you happen to run across any illegal drugs, you should call the Sheriff's Office or your local police department.

VFW Ladies' Auxiliary Rummage Sale

The VFW Ladies' Auxiliary held a rummage sale at the Bay City Community Hall Sept. 7 and 8. I'm pleased to report that the sale was very successful.

The ladies of the Auxiliary wish to express their thanks for your generosity. A lot of merchandise changed hands, and the coffers for veterans' programs were enriched handsomely.

Thanks to all for your generosity.

City Council

Mayor Shaena Peterson named Sara Charlton to the Planning Commission at the Sept. 11 City Council meeting. Sara is the first Planning Commission member who lives outside the City but within the Urban Growth Boundary (UGB). The Planning Commission ordinance was revised earlier in the year to allow people from within the UGB to serve on the Commission. The Planning Commission has had several land use issues recently which involved land within the UGB.

 

Kenneth Lommen advised the Council that he had closed the Slip-n-Slide and emptied the lower pond, located in the public right-of-way. Children are no longer using it. Lommen asked the Council for more time to remove all the appurtenances from the right-of-way. "This is the busiest time of the year," Lommen, a timber falling contractor, explained. The Council allowed him until October 5 to remove everything encroaching onto the public right-of-way.

Public Works Superintendent Dave Pace reported that he and City Planner Sabrina Pearson had met with Bud Gienger and Morgan Civil Engineering to discuss the engineer's report and examine the area. The report presented at the Sept. 11 Council meeting was incomplete, in that it did not bear the stamp of a certified geologist or geotechnical engineer.

The Council met again at a special meeting today to review stamped reports and recommendations prepared by Morgan Civil Engineering, Inc., of Manzanita, and Horning Geosciences of Seaside.

The Council agreed that the City would issue the necessary permits to Bay Ridge Development and Larry Peters for the work needed to stabilize the area. The City will maintain a presence, but engineering and geology progress reports will be directed to the property owners, with copies to the City. The Council set a deadline of September 30 to complete the stabilization phase of the repair. The area will be hydroseeded for the winter, with permanent vegetation being installed next spring and summer.

Larry Peters, whose property has been affected by the excavation, stated that he wanted to know who the bonded and licensed excavation contractor will be, in pursuit of his own due diligence. He expressed his appreciation of the City's efforts to get the hillside stabilized before the fall rains set in.

In other Council business at the Sept. 11 meeting, Dave also reported that an abatement notice had been posted at the 7895 18th Street property on August 15, directing removal of derelict vehicles, junk and debris by Sept. 7. Since the posting, Dave added, more items have been brought in and deposited on the property. The property has been the recipient of several ordinance violation notices in the past. The Council authorized Dave to hire a contractor to abate the nuisance by removing the debris, rather than attempting to do it with City employees.

There is also a second violation: The property continues to be occupied even though the water has been shut off. The Council mulled several alternatives to deal with this problem, including citation into Justice Court for a misdemeanor, directing that water services be restored and all fees paid, or levying a fine for each day the property remains occupied without a water connection.

Dave reported that the intertie with the Tillamook water system is complete. It has been chlorinated and he is waiting for the results of coliform testing. Upon receipt of a negative coliform report, Dave said, the connection will be pressure-tested.

Jack Navel appeared before the Council at its Sept. 10 workshop to discuss subdividing a large lot on Hare Street into two lots with an easement to the second lot for access and utilities, in lieu of developing the street to the end of the second lot. In other words, he hoped to subdivide the lots so that the second lot would be a flag lot even though it has "street" frontage. There is a small grove of evergreens in the Hare Street right-of-way that Navel would like to leave in place.

After lengthy discussion, the Council determined that the subdivision Navel requested could not be done under the current Streets Ordinance, which would require that the trees be removed and the street be brought up to standard to the end of the second lot.

Dave reported that the costs to pave the tennis court had risen since the original bids were received in 2011. S&C Paving, which bid $18,000 last year, now bids $21,945. Bayview Transit said it would do the job for last year's bid of $21,760. For an additional $2,500, Bayview Transit said it would also level and grade the tennis court. Dave pointed out that Bayview Transit's experience includes outdoor tennis courts.

The Council approved Dave's request to contract with Bayview Transit, which plans to do the work later in September, when it will have equipment in the area to do paving at the Creamery.

Firewood

Brett Bertrand contacted me several weeks ago about firewood for needy folks. If you know a needy family, give Brett a call at (503) 812-2962.

A Sweet Dog needs a Loving Home

Dave Hurd contacted me recently, advising that a friend, Joan Brown, was moving to an assisted living facility, and had to find another home for Riley, her five-year-old Malamute mix.

If you're interested in providing a home for Riley, please give Joan a call at (503) 437-3091.

Dinner at Downie's Café

Downie's Café is now open for dinner Thursday through Sunday evenings. They have developed a very tempting dinner menu. Dinner is served from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Thursday and Sunday, and 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Try it. You'll like it.

Bay City Arts Center

I'm happy to report that the BCAC bulletins are circulating once again.

September Artist of the Month is Patsy Chapin. I attended the reception for her Saturday, September 1. She has some beautiful watercolors, and prints of watercolors on display. Her work is very detailed, and looks almost as if it were a photograph. There's a real talent there!

Patsy Chapin was on hand at the September Pancake Breakfast to discuss her work and welcome guests. She will be at the Arts Center Wednesdays, from 10 a.m. to noon through the month of September, to share her techniques.

There will be a three-day stone-carving workshop Sept. 29 through Oct. 1. The program will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day, and tools will be provided, but you can bring your own tools if you wish. Cost is by donation.

Lunch during the workshop will be potluck, with coffee, tea and juice provided by BCAC. To register, call (503) 377-9620.

Yoga classes will resume Thursday, September 20, and will be held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. The phone number is (503) 377-9620.

Nancy Slavin's Toddler Art sessions will resume October 3. Classes will be held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend.

On October 21, the Arts Center will host its monthly All-You-Can-Eat Pancake Breakfast. Cost is $5 for adults, $4 for members. Kids eat for half price.

BCAC will be decorating a tree for the Festival of Trees at the Pioneer Museum. If you're interested in helping with this, call the Arts Center and let them know. The festival date has not been announced.

Also, BCAC wants to remind you to mark you calendar for December 12. That is the date for the big fundraising dinner. More on this later.

BCAC wishes to thank Jenny Wyss for her support to BCAC and her students in their spectacular shows, and for her donation of art supplies and the wonderful mat cutter. Jenny used to teach at Tillamook High School, and now lives and works in California.

BCAC also wishes to thank the Tillamook County Creamery Association for the electric hole punch and the folding machine, plus three packages of glossy printing paper.

And, a little heads up. You will recall that Charlie Wooldridge and Jim Fullan went to Ireland earlier this summer to do some serious photography. Charlie told me recently that he and Jim were contemplating showing the photos in March 2013 in honor of St. Paddy's Day. More on this later.

Bits and Pieces

Sharline and I celebrated our 60th wedding anniversary Sept. 13. It was also my birthday, but we don't talk about those things any more. Too many behind me, and too few ahead.

We went to our daughter's place in Lincoln City, and had a wonderful time. All three of our daughters were there to celebrate with us. Carla, our eldest daughter, had made a glorious New York style cheesecake, something I hadn't had since I was a 14-year-old kid in my first year of high school in lower Manhattan. And, I must say, she did a truly magnificent job. It was just like the cheesecake I discovered at the school cafeteria.

My youngest daughter told us that we were about to become great grandparents for the umpteenth time. Her youngest daughter was due to produce a son in just over a week. I've lost count of the number of great grandchildren we now have. Another granddaughter, Carla's daughter, will produce a son in November. I expect her in-laws will arrive from India to help celebrate the event.

Then, Saturday, my brother called me from Conroe, Texas. Patrick had suffered a stroke about six weeks ago, and is making excellent progress recovering his speech. He had to grope for a few words, but we had a great chat. He lost his wife in 1995, and now lives in a home provided by his son. Strangely, our telephone conversations always seem to be limited by the effectiveness of my brother's water pill. I guess that's the price of getting old.

VFW Post 2848 recently changed its meeting day and time. The Post and its Auxiliary now meet the first Saturday of the month at 12:30 p.m. at City Hall. The next meeting will be October 6, 2012.

And that's it.

See you soon in the Grapevine.

 

September 6, 2012

Se

Just a quickie. Sharline and I had a quiet Labor Day weekend. We just rested. Of late, I've been trying to keep too many balls in the air at one time. I guess we all have our limits.

School's in Session

Just a quick reminder. School started Tuesday in most locations. Remember to watch for little children waiting for their school bus. The older kids know the drill, but the kids going to school for the first time may not know not to run out into the street.

And, remember, it's 20 mph through school zones. I recall a highway sign outside the city of St. Regis, Mont. "We have lots of kids, but none to spare." Keep that in mind when driving in a school zone, or where kids are getting on or off the school bus.

Summer Burning Restrictions

All outdoor burning is still prohibited, but I hope it ends soon. I'm anxious to try out my new burn barrel. The old one disintegrated. Be patient. Nothing is forever.

Fire Department Car Wash

Good news. Darrell Griffith, our fire chief, informs me that the Firefighters' Association took in $857 from the car wash last week. Darrel thanks all who came to have their cars washed.

The amount taken in was just about enough to buy a front-loading washer, but there are a few other expenses involved to install it. But they're close.

I might add that they did a great job on my Ranger. People don't recognize it any more, because all the moss is gone from the north side. We have a first rate fire department, and I'm certainly proud to give them all the support I can.

NW Oregon Vets' Consortium

CARE is a part of the NW Oregon Veterans' Consortium, and the recipient of a Supportive Services to Veterans' Families grant. According to Erin Skaar of CARE, the grant provides housing support and case management to veterans who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.

The group seeks participation by service providers, veterans' advocates and other interested community members. Its first meeting will be held Monday, September 10, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Carl Rawe Conference Room at Tillamook PUD. If you're interested in helping our veterans, come down and see what you can do.

Emergency Preparedness

John Gettman just e-mailed me a link to view photos of earthquake damage. When the time comes, we can insert some examples of earthquake damage in our planning documents. They say that one picture equals a thousand words. And that's very true.

I am reminded of the evacuation drill we conducted last May. One family group came up Portland Avenue in a four-wheel-drive pickup. The gentleman driving the pickup was absolutely certain that he could take that vehicle anywhere following a catastrophic quake. A few pictures would certainly demonstrate why that might not be possible.

When the Big One occurs here, you can expect the land where you're standing to drop as much as six feet and shoot westward about 20 feet. Roads will be impassible, and, even in an off-road vehicle, you'll encounter obstacles you can't drive over or around. Best to hoof it!

Prescription Drug Disposal Program

Earlier in the year, the Sheriff's Office collected unused prescription drugs for disposal. Traditionally, we've been accustomed to disposing of unused prescription drugs by tossing them in the garbage of flushing them down the toilet.

Both these methods of disposal are bad ideas. If you put them in the garbage, they'll eventually end up in a landfill, where they may be ingested by the critters that frequent such places in search of their daily sustenance. You can imagine that ingesting an antibiotic, a statin or a pain killer is likely to harm wildlife. And, when you flush your unused Oxycontin down the toilet, it doesn't go away when it passes through the wastewater treatment plant. It remains in the water and finds its way into ecosystem.

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has a semi-annual take-back program. But, for the convenience of County residents, the Sheriff's Office has chosen to have a place where people can take their unused or unwanted prescription medication for disposal.

Troy Jackson, a detective with the Sheriff's Office, provided a list of places where people could turn in their unused or unwanted prescription drugs.

The Sheriff's Office has a receptacle for unused prescription drugs at its location on Long Prairie Road. The office is open to the public from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week.

The Tillamook Police Department, located at 207 Madrona Ave., has a drop box for unused prescription drugs, available 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday though Friday.

Garibaldi City Hall, at 107 Sixth Street, accepts them Mondays from noon to 5 p.m., and Tuesday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Manzanita Police Department at 165 S. Fifth Street accepts them seven days a week, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Residents are asked to call (503) 368-7229 before coming in.

The above locations accept unused or expired prescription medication and over-the-counter drugs. Liquids must be in sealed containers. The program accepts pills, tablets, capsules, gels, liquids, ointments or creams, preferably in original containers.

The program does NOT accept IV bags, syringes, sharps, thermometers, hydrogen peroxide, aerosol cans, inhalers, or blood-contaminated materials.

Troy recommends that you black out personal information on any containers you turn in.

I asked Troy about illegal drugs. For any illegal drugs you may discover, call the Sheriff's Office or your local police department.

VFW Ladies' Auxiliary Rummage Sale

The VFW Ladies' Auxiliary is holding a rummage sale at the Bay City Community Hall from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8.

I was down there this afternoon to deliver some rummage, and there is a lot of stuff waiting to be taken home by somebody. No prices are marked. You pick it out and price it yourself.

 Proceeds from the sale help the VFW Auxiliary with their programs for veterans and children. I expect to drop by either of these days to see if I can find that elusive item I've always been yearning for.

 

Veterans Day Program

The VFW and the Air Museum are planning a gala celebration of Veterans Day this November. This year's program honors veterans of the Korean War. We've had programs dedicated to veterans of WWII, Iraq and Afghanistan, the Gulf War and Vietnam, but never for Korea.

Next year, the nation commemorates the 60th anniversary of the cessation of hostilities, as agreed at the peace conference at Panmunjom.

There will be two keynote speakers, as we have done for the last several years. This year's first speaker will be Don Adams, a Navy veteran of the Korean War. Don is working on the Veterans' History Project for the Library of Congress. He went on to fame and fortune in Hollywood as a production company director, and has many friends in the show biz world.

I'll be the other speaker. I'll have a few thoughts about the Korean War, and a few memories to share.

There will be some other events during the days around Veterans Day, which will be celebrated on Monday, November 12, since November 11 falls on a Sunday. Denny's plans some activities to honor and support veterans. Anita Hanakahi is working closely with the Denny's staff on this, and we'll have more details later on.

The Tillamook County Library has reserved a meeting room for our VFW post and Auxiliary Unit from noon to 5 p.m. Friday, November 9. We are putting together a program for that afternoon, and I'll be able to provide more details in a couple of weeks. Stay tuned.

Firewood

Brett Bertrand contacted me several weeks ago about firewood for needy folks. If you know a needy family, give Brett a call at (503) 812-2962.

A Sweet Dog needs a Loving Home

Dave Hurd contacted me recently, advising that a friend, Joan Brown, was moving to an assisted living facility, and had to find another home for Riley, her five-year-old Malamute mix.

If you're interested in providing a home for Riley, please give Joan a call at (503) 437-3091.

Dinner at Downie's Café

Downie's Café is now open for dinner Thursday through Sunday evenings. They have developed a very tempting dinner menu. Dinner is served from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Thursday and Sunday, and 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Try it. You'll like it.

Bay City Arts Center

The Arts Center's new Web site is up and running. Check the Links section of the Grapevine. But, sadly, I haven't received any update on Arts Center activities for about a month, so I'm flying blind.

I asked Charlie Wooldridge about the problem, and he said that he had had reports that some members were not getting their weekly updates. And I'm still not getting them!

September Artist of the Month is Patsy Chapin. I attended the reception for her Saturday, September 1. She has some beautiful watercolors, and prints of watercolors on display. Her work is very detailed, and looks almost as if it were a photograph. There's a real talent there!

On September 15, the Arts Center will host its monthly All-You-Can-Eat Pancake Breakfast. Cost is $5 for adults, $4 for members. Kids eat for half price.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. The phone number is (503) 377-9620.

Nancy Slavin's Toddler Art sessions are suspended for the summer. Starting in the fall, sessions will resume every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. There is no charge to attend. Charlie Wooldridge said they'd probably resume about mid-September.

BCAC is looking for volunteer help to work in the greenhouse.

Bits and Pieces

You know, I had a really lousy day today, almost like that guy in "Waterworld," who lost an eye when his "Smokers" did something really dumb.

I started out early in the morning, fed the dog, and headed to the Air Museum for our monthly Vets Day planning meeting. Then I ran a lot of errands and got some shopping done before getting back home. That was about 1:30, and I still hadn't had breakfast.

I brought in the groceries and took out an unused toaster oven, a barometer and some old phonograph records to be delivered to the Community Hall for the rummage sale. I opened up the back of my pickup canopy and carried the stuff into the hall.

When I came back out, someone called out to me, and I engaged in a short conversation before getting back into my pickup and returning home. Upon arrival, I decided I would put the pickup in a slot across from my driveway so I could mow the dandelions.

The next thing I know, Sharline is out on the deck screaming at me, and the dog is barking her little head off. Exasperated, I exited the truck and asked what's the damned problem. The problem was that I had driven all the way home with the back of the pickup open. When I backed it into the slot across from my driveway, the open flap at the back of the canopy had come in second best when it ran smack into a hefty rhododendron branch.

The back flap was too far forward, and I couldn't close it all the way. It took a moment to suppress the overwhelming urge to panic. Nothing looked particularly out of shape, but I still couldn't close it all the way. The reason suddenly became apparent. On each side of the flap there is a piston-like device that extends and holds the flap open. It is attached to a little metal tab on the side of the flap. The force of the encounter with the rhododendron had bent the tabs out, so that they struck the side of the opening whenever I tried to close the flap.

Those tabs were of pretty heavy-gauge metal, because I couldn't bend them back with a set of heavy-duty pliers. Brute force was called for. I got a hammer and peened them back enough to clear the sides of the opening --- barely. At least it closes, though not quite as smoothly as it did before I stupidly drove home with the thing open.

I think my years must be catching up with me. Or maybe my blood sugar was low. It was nearly 3 p.m., and I still hadn't had any breakfast!

VFW Post 2848 recently changed its meeting day and time. The Post and its Auxiliary now meet the first Saturday of the month at 12:30 p.m. at City Hall. The next meeting will be October 6, 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home | The Back Fence | Past Issues of Grapevine | Contact | Slug's Eye View | History | Links

Website design and maintenance: WEB