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Over The Back Fence 2013

December 13, 2013

BAY CITY, December 13, 2013 --- We had a very interesting City Council meeting on Dec. 10. The resignation of David Pace brought a number of ongoing projects to a stop, temporarily, pending hiring of a new superintendent of public works. But I’m pleased to report that the neighborhood deer survived the cold snap, because they were in my yard when I went out yesterday evening.

Goal Setting Workshop

I hope you all read your water bills. No, not the side that tells you how much water you’ve used --- I mean the other side. Your most recent water bill contains an important message.

The City has scheduled a Town Hall meeting for Saturday, January 25, starting at 3 p.m. Mayor Shaena Peterson will give her “State of the City” address, followed by reports from the City Council, Planning Commission, Parks Committee and City Staff.

But the most important contribution must be provided by our Bay City residents. The following paragraphs illustrate some of the things I am aware of.

The City has a number of pressing needs, and we need to plan the best way to meet them. Our intersections with U.S. 101 are all in desperate need of improvement. The ideal highway intersection is a right angle, and none of our intersections with U.S. 101 meet that criterion. ODOT caused that problem when they built the highway bypassing Bay City. Now we are faced with rectifying that problem while also creating safe pedestrian crossings of the highway.

The Vision Plan, created about 10 years ago, needs to be dusted off and brought up to date. Then, it needs to be actually put into effect. The plans we develop for the City should be more than dust catchers on a bookshelf. They need to be used.

And, of course, our biggest need is to relocate our fire station out of the tsunami inundation zone. We had purchased the old school property for the express purpose of relocating the fire station. What was not used for the fire station would then be made into a beautiful park. But, sadly, that didn’t happen. We became absorbed with the park, and then tried to stick the fire station in some convenient spot. That’s not the way to site a fire station. We need a plan, and we need to stick to it.

We have a failing water distribution and sewer collection infrastructure, and we must lay plans to replace portions of these systems over the coming years. To defer upgrading our water and wastewater systems is to perpetuate a system of breakdown and crisis maintenance, which is costly and disruptive to the City’s ratepayers.

David Pace had noted that the second well had been pumping water more of the time, which means that demand for water has increased. The City can look forward to progressively greater demand for water over the coming decade. We need to prepare for that sooner rather than later. A third well is needed, as well as at least two new low-level reservoirs. As population in the area increases, which it will, demands for water for general use and for fire flow will soon outpace the City’s ability to produce it.

And we have some more immediate needs. The City needs some improved valves on its reservoirs, and it needs a telemetry system to alert Public Works of any unusual flow of water from the reservoirs. The high level reservoir on Baseline Road lacks a shutoff valve altogether.

There’ll be some visual aids prepared between now and then, and some refreshments will be served. The most important contribution, however, needs to be provided by you, the Bay City resident or businessperson. We need your thoughts and ideas, so please mark your calendars and be prepared to share your concerns, ideas, solutions and goals for the City.

Emergency Preparedness

The next meeting of the Emergency Preparedness Committee will be held at the Fire Station January 15, 2014, at 5:30 p.m.

Darrell Griffith announced at the last meeting on December 11 that he planned to do another tabletop exercise. This time, he said, he’ll make use of telephone, HAM and FRS radio, as one would in a real event. Darrell said he expects to have the new HAM base station by then, set to communicate on both HAM and FRS frequencies.

Wendy Schink will have her team of block captains meeting at the Community Hall then, and will participate in the tabletop drill from there, to develop communications protocols, among other things.

Wendy and the Block Captains, and anyone else interested in learning about the City’s Map Your Neighborhood grass roots emergency preparedness program, will meet Saturday, January 11, 2014, at the Fire Station, from 10 a.m. to noon. The agenda includes discussion of what support the Block Captains need when meeting their neighbors, command and communication structure, and FRS radio training. I’ll look forward to seeing you there.

Vacancies in City Government

The Planning Commission has filled one of its vacancies. Fred Rigwood has been appointed to the Planning Commission, and attended his first meeting November 20. That leaves one existing vacancy needing to be filled. Another is expected in the not-too-distant future. One of our members wishes to resign as soon as a replacement can be found. To apply, you need only fill out an application at the city office. Applicants may expect to be interviewed.

Fred comes to the Commission very well qualified. He served on the planning commission in Pasco, Washington, for several years, and he has some experience in construction. The Commission members look forward to working with Fred now that he is a member of the Commission.

City Council

The Council met December 10 for its first meeting since the departure of David Pace, former Public Works Superintendent.

Attending the meeting were two representatives of the Tillamook County Creamery Association, and Steve Donovan of SHN Engineering.

The creamery representatives expressed concerned about the water they currently purchase from the Kilchis Regional Water District. David’s departure leaves the City temporarily without a person with the proper level of certifications in water systems, water treatment, and wastewater collection and treatment. The state requires that water reports be signed by a person with the appropriate level of certification.

The Creamery representatives had rationalized that a person with level four certifications would be needed because the water district is “large.” They were concerned that the Creamery might have to purchase its water from Tillamook instead of from the Kilchis Regional Water District. Councilor Kari Fleischer said that her research found that the Tillamook water system required only a level two certification.

Extended discussion was held on the issue of “borrowing” signatures from Tillamook or other water systems in the area. Councilor John Gettman noted that local businesses, Zwald, for example, had people with the proper credentials to sign of on the City’s monthly reports. Mayor Shaena Peterson stated that she expected to have the vacant public works superintendent position filled by March 1.

Steve Donovan of SHN Engineering, brought the Council up to date on the status of current City projects.

The City needs to conduct certain studies of the city’s wastewater collection and treatment facility capacities to determine what improvements are necessary for the next 20 years. Donovan also noted the need to conduct an Inflow and Infiltration study to determine whether removal of extraneous water flows or providing additional treatment capacity would be the most cost effective means to expand the City’s wastewater treatment capacity for the next 20 years. This project is presently on hold pending the City’s acquisition of a flow meter.

Donovan proposed an update of the City’s Capital Improvement Plan for the water system, and determine the best means to “harden” the infrastructure. Much of the water distribution system consists of thin wall pipe installed when the system was built, about 1980.

Other concerns include improvement of the City’s transportation system and the intersections with U.S. 101, and receipt of grant moneys to support paving projects. SHN Engineering is awaiting authorization to proceed with establishment of drainage easements on 4th Street. SHN had developed preliminary plans for shoreline stabilization at the Wastewater Treatment Plant. Stabilization is needed to protect the local wastewater drainage ponds while complying with local wetland and shoreline regulatory controls.

The City has begun a two-phased improvement of the well field at Dill Bar. The work is being performed by a subcontractor, 4B Engineering. The work involves planning a separate electric control structure and system, located away from the pump house. The second phase is the drilling of an additional well.

SHN is also awaiting authorization to proceed with the first phase of the Watt Family Park development. The City had just received its authorization to proceed.

Two of the three planned river undercrossing projects have been completed. These projects are being funded through a FEMA reimbursement grant. The crossing under the Wilson River is complete, tested, and available for use. The Alderbrook crossing is also complete, with several “punch list” items remain to be addressed.

The planned Forest Road crossing will require a different approach because of previously unknown geologic conditions. The contractor must lengthen the alignment and add conductor casings to the project, which will increase the project’s cost.

Donovan also advised that the work on the Forest Road crossing can be done at any time, because it does not involve “in water” work.

The City approved Resolution 13-17, adding $284,129 to the project cost, which includes an additional 10 percent for unforeseen contingencies. Total project cost is now $1,224,129.

The Council also approved an extension of the SHN contract for engineering services to November 14, 2014.

The Council discussed the matter of appointing an acting public works superintendent. Gettman suggested naming Donald Miller, since he had several of the certifications needed for the job. That suggestion was rejected because Miller’s responsibilities at the wastewater treatment would not allow him time to supervise the other employees.

The Council named Brian Bettis acting superintendent. The Council authorized Shaena to contact Tillamook mayor Suzanne Weber to discuss having Tillamook’s superintendent sign off on Bay City’s water reports. Councilor Tom Dotson suggested that Bettis visit Tillamook public works to work out some ground rules.

Code enforcement had been performed by David Pace. The Council named Bettis acting Code Enforcement Officer until a new superintendent is hired.

Donovan reminded the Council that he could not make decisions on behalf of the City, noting that his function was to make recommendations. The Council authorized deferring further work on several ongoing projects pending hiring of a new superintendent.

 

The Council discussed the Brian Lemon property, which has been without sewer and water for an extended period. Lacking these facilities, the property constitutes a health hazard. Lois suggested strategizing how to get the Health Department to condemn the property as a health hazard. Meanwhile Lois will file liens against the property for amounts owed the City.

The Council adopted resolutions authorizing purchase of a flow meter; making modest increases in camping fees in Al Griffin Memorial Park; exempting the City from competitive bidding requirements to purchase a new fire truck; and adding receipt of $6,284.14 in unanticipated income to the City’s General Fund.

Shaena presented a brochure entitled “Managing Employee Performance Tools” to the Council members and asked them to study it. She also noted that the City of Rockaway Beach was holding a Chili Cook-off on January 25, between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m., and pondered whether the Council could make the cook-off and get back to Bay City in time to attend the Town Hall Meeting scheduled to start at 3 p.m.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters Club welcomes all who live in or near Bay City. The club meets the last Friday of the month, with special provisions for the months of November and December.

In view of the Christmas holiday in December, the Boosters will next meet December 20. Members should bring their potluck items between 11:30 and noon, and the formal meeting will start at noon. Actually, there will be no regular meeting per se, but rather a Christmas celebration, which will include a gift exchange.

Burning Suggestions

Burn permits for 2014 are now available at the City office. There is no charge for a burn permit.

And remember, please, that when you burn, you want a hot, clean fire. Please consider your neighbors when you burn. You don’t want to generate a lot of smelly smoke, which can be very annoying to them.

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

Bay City United Methodist Church

The Church is preparing for its 17th annual Christmas Shoppe, which will be held December 13 and 14.

Community members can help with this project by donating new gift items for all family age groups. The purpose of the Christmas Shoppe is to enable needy persons to purchase or obtain Christmas gifts for their families.

Families are referred to the Christmas Shoppe by various charitable organizations in Tillamook County. The gift items are not priced. Instead, the shoppers may obtain gifts for what they can afford to spend --- which may be for free when necessary.

People wishing to donate gift items may bring them to the church Monday, December 9, through Wednesday, December 11, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Financial donations may also be made, noting on the check that the donation is for the Christmas Shoppe.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace

ArtSpace has been renamed, “Fresh.” It’s official.

They serve smoothies and other goodies, according to the signs on one of the front windows. I’ve been meaning to get down there after a long hiatus to check it out, but there always seems to be a hotter brush fire that needs to be addressed. I did make it down there for the recent Wadley fundraiser. I noticed an attractive menu posted by the kitchen, so I believe the place is returning to its former self. Sharline and I will have to try a lunch down there soon.

Bay City Arts Center

December Artist of the Month is Brittany Gerken. Her works will be on display through the month of December.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, Dec. 15. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. All levels are welcome.

Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend, but donations are welcome to help cover the cost of utilities.

January Artist of the Month is YOU, the members of the Bay City Arts Center. If you have items you would like to exhibit, bring them by the Arts Center January 2. Be sure they are ready to hang. This is an opportunity for the community to celebrate we have in our own midst.

The Board of Directors meets the first Monday of each month. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you want to get on the agenda, contact Dia Norris at gnorris@oregoncoast.com.

If you are an artist and would like to have your work displayed at the Arts Center, contact Terra Wilcoxen at the Arts Center, (503) 377-9620.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Latimer Quilt and Textile Center

The Latimer Quilt and Textile Center will present “Journey through Nature,” an exhibit by quilt artist June Jaeger, who has won numerous awards for her quilts. The exhibit runs from Nov. 4 through January 4, 2014. June will be at the open house set for Sunday, November 10, from noon to 4 p.m. She will be available to sign her latest book, “Adventures in Landscape Quilting.”

June is an Oregon native who was introduced to quilting in 1969. She owns her own company, Log Cabin Quiltworks, designs her own quilt patterns, and teaches throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Contact Linda Machuta at (503) 842-8622 or email her at latimertextile@centurylink.net for more information.

Bits and Pieces

I thank everyone who expressed their condolences on the passing of my younger brother. Today, Dec. 13, Patrick was laid to rest at Culpepper National Cemetery, near Stanardsville, where he had a cabin for many years. That, I believe, was my brother’s favorite part of the country.

My sincerest thanks go to my nephew, Richard Sullivan, who took charge of my brother’s funeral and interment. That is not an easy job. I can speak from experience, having had to perform that function several times during my life.

The 13th of the month has always held a special significance for me. Not only was I born on the 13th, my first day of school was on my birthday. And I got married on that day, and the first house I ever purchased was located at 13313 Oriental Street in Rockville, Maryland.

But more to the point, it was 65 years ago today, December 13, that I raised my right hand and became a member of the U.S. Navy. My dad, a career Army officer, took me to the Navy Recruiting Station in lower Manhattan, and told me I was joining the Navy. “We’ll be fighting the Russkies soon,” he told me, “and I want you aboard a nice, clean ship where you will get three squares a day, not slogging through the mud with the infantry.” Well, we never got into a shooting war with the “Russkies,” but I did find myself slogging ashore at Inchon on Sept. 15, 1950. 63 years ago today, Dec. 13, 1950, I was in the process of being evacuated through the port of Hungnam in North Korea. I was a member of the 1st Medical Battalion, 1st Marine Division.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be Thursday, January 16 at 6 p.m.

 

December 7, 2013

BAY CITY, December 7, 2013 --- I know, I’m late again. But this time I believe I have a pretty good reason. My brother passed away suddenly on December 3. When there is a death in the family, everything else gets put aside. Getting old is certainly no fun, especially when your siblings start dying off.

Goal Setting Workshop

I hope you all read your water bills. No, not the side that tells you how much water you’ve used --- I mean the other side. Your most recent water bill contains an important message.

The City has scheduled a Town Hall meeting for Saturday, January 25, starting at 3 p.m. Mayor Shaena Peterson will give her “State of the City” address, followed by reports from the City Council, Planning Commission, Parks Committee and City Staff.

But the most important contribution must be provided by our Bay City residents. The following paragraphs illustrate some of the things I am aware of.

The City has a number of pressing needs, and we need to plan the best way to meet them. Our intersections with U.S. 101 are all in desperate need of improvement. The ideal highway intersection is a right angle, and none of our intersections with U.S. 101 meet that criterion. ODOT caused that problem when they built the highway bypassing Bay City. Now we are faced with rectifying that problem while also creating safe pedestrian crossings of the highway.

The Vision Plan, created about 10 years ago, needs to be dusted off and brought up to date. Then, it needs to be actually put into effect. The plans we develop for the City should be more than dust catchers on a bookshelf. They need to be used.

And, of course, our biggest need is to relocate our fire station out of the tsunami inundation zone. We had purchased the old school property for the express purpose of relocating the fire station. What was not used for the fire station would then be made into a beautiful park. But, sadly, that didn’t happen. We became absorbed with the park, and then tried to stick the fire station in some convenient spot. That’s not the way to site a fire station. We need a plan, and we need to stick to it.

We have a failing water distribution and sewer collection infrastructure, and we must lay plans to replace portions of these systems over the coming years. To defer upgrading our water and wastewater systems is to perpetuate a system of breakdown and crisis maintenance, which is costly and disruptive to the City’s ratepayers.

David Pace had noted that the second well had been pumping water more of the time, which means that demand for water has increased. The City can look forward to progressively greater demand for water over the coming decade. We need to prepare for that sooner rather than later. A third well is needed, as well as at least two new low-level reservoirs. As population in the area increases, which it will, demands for water for general use and for fire flow will soon outpace the City’s ability to produce it.

And we have some more immediate needs. The City needs some improved valves on its reservoirs, and it needs a telemetry system to alert Public Works of any unusual flow of water from the reservoirs. The high level reservoir on Baseline Road lacks a shutoff valve altogether.

There’ll be some visual aids prepared between now and then, and some refreshments will be served. The most important contribution, however, needs to be provided by you, the Bay City resident or businessperson. We need your thoughts and ideas, so please mark your calendars and be prepared to share your concerns, ideas, solutions and goals for the City.

Emergency Preparedness

The next meeting of the Emergency Preparedness Committee will be held at the Fire Station December 11, at 5:30 p.m.

Wendy and Liane also announced that the Block Captains, and anyone else interested in learning about the City’s Map Your Neighborhood grass roots emergency preparedness program, will meet Saturday, January 11, 2014, at the Fire Station, from 10 a.m. to noon. The agenda includes discussion of what support the Block Captains need when meeting their neighbors, command and communication structure, and FRS radio training. I’ll look forward to seeing you there.

Vacancies in City Government

The Planning Commission has filled one of its vacancies. Fred Rigwood has been appointed to the Planning Commission, and attended his first meeting November 20. That leaves one existing vacancy needing to be filled. Another is expected in the not-too-distant future. One of our members wishes to resign as soon as a replacement can be found. To apply, you need only fill out an application at the city office. Applicants may expect to be interviewed.

Fred comes to the Commission very well qualified. He served on the planning commission in Pasco, Washington, for several years, and he has some experience in construction. The Commission members look forward to working with Fred now that he is a member of the Commission.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters Club welcomes all who live in or near Bay City. The club meets the last Friday of the month, with special provisions for the months of November and December.

In view of the Christmas holiday in December, the Boosters will next meet December 20. Members should bring their potluck items between 11:30 and noon, and the formal meeting will start at noon. Actually, there will be no regular meeting per se, but rather a Christmas celebration, which will include a gift exchange.

Burning Suggestions

Burn permits for 2014 are now available at the City office. There is no charge for a burn permit.

And remember, please, that when you burn, you want a hot, clean fire. Please consider your neighbors when you burn. You don’t want to generate a lot of smelly smoke, which can be very annoying to them.

Public Works Superintendent

David Pace has resigned as Public Works Superintendent effective December 3. I first learned of some discord between the Council and David at the City Council workshop held Nov. 11. David slipped me a note during the meeting, telling me that, “the City Council has asked me to voluntarily terminate my employment with the City.”

Most of the negotiations between David and the City took place in private, and are not a matter for public discussion. Though David remained on the job until his resignation date, that time was not sufficient for him to complete most of the projects with which he was involved. He was in the middle of the river undercrossing project, having completed two, with one left to go. This was a FEMA-funded project to remove waterlines from three bridges and put them under the rivers. The Wilson River crossing was to provide alternate sources of water for the Creamery should the Bay City water system fail, and for Tillamook Hospital should the Tillamook water system fail.

He was also in the middle of a project to place the electrical controls for the well pumps into a separate building, to prevent damage should a pump malfunction and spray water in the pump room. He was also involved in redesigning the electrical system to support a third pump when the new well is finally drilled.

I am truly sorry to see David leave. I thought highly of him. He was highly competent, polite, cooperative and knowledgeable. He worked well with others. He also had a head for detail, a very helpful asset when dealing with FEMA or federal grant accounting.

My very best wishes to you, David, should you happen to read these lines. And I am happy to serve as a reference for you, should you need one. Take care.

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

 

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

Bay City United Methodist Church

The Church is preparing for its 17th annual Christmas Shoppe, which will be held December 13 and 14.

Community members can help with this project by donating new gift items for all family age groups. The purpose of the Christmas Shoppe is to enable needy persons to purchase or obtain Christmas gifts for their families.

Families are referred to the Christmas Shoppe by various charitable organizations in Tillamook County. The gift items are not priced. Instead, the shoppers may obtain gifts for what they can afford to spend --- which may be for free when necessary.

People wishing to donate gift items may bring them to the church Monday, December 9, through Wednesday, December 11, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Financial donations may also be made, noting on the check that the donation is for the Christmas Shoppe.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace

ArtSpace has been renamed, “Fresh.” It’s official.

They serve smoothies and other goodies, according to the signs on one of the front windows. I’ve been meaning to get down there after a long hiatus to check it out, but there always seems to be a hotter brush fire that needs to be addressed. I did make it down there for the recent Wadley fundraiser. I noticed an attractive menu posted by the kitchen, so I believe the place is returning to its former self. Sharline and I will have to try a lunch down there soon.

Bay City Arts Center

December Artist of the Month is Brittany Gerken. Her works will be on display through the month of December.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, Dec. 15. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. All levels are welcome.

Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend, but donations are welcome to help cover the cost of utilities.

Coming soon the Arts Center will be creating its Christmas Tree to be given to the Festival of Trees. As always, the BCAC Tree is made up from driftwood. To do this, the Arts Center needs donations of interesting pieces of driftwood. The Arts Center would also appreciate donation of old-fashioned ornaments and your hand-made treasures. You may drop off your contributions at the Bay City Arts Center.

January Artist of the Month is YOU, the members of the Bay City Arts Center. If you have items you would like to exhibit, bring them by the Arts Center January 2. Be sure they are ready to hang. This is an opportunity for the community to celebrate we have in our own midst.

The Board of Directors meets the first Monday of each month. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you want to get on the agenda, contact Dia Norris at gnorris@oregoncoast.com.

If you are an artist and would like to have your work displayed at the Arts Center, contact Terra Wilcoxen at the Arts Center, (503) 377-9620.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Latimer Quilt and Textile Center

The Latimer Quilt and Textile Center will present “Journey through Nature,” an exhibit by quilt artist June Jaeger, who has won numerous awards for her quilts. The exhibit runs from Nov. 4 through January 4, 2014. June will be at the open house set for Sunday, November 10, from noon to 4 p.m. She will be available to sign her latest book, “Adventures in Landscape Quilting.”

June is an Oregon native who was introduced to quilting in 1969. She owns her own company, Log Cabin Quiltworks, designs her own quilt patterns, and teaches throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Contact Linda Machuta at (503) 842-8622 or email her at latimertextile@centurylink.net for more information.

Kiwanda Community Center

The Kiwanda Community Center will be holding its Christmas Bazaar Saturday and Sunday, December 7 and 8, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be baked items, handmade gifts, arts, crafts, Christmas decorations and other seasonal items for its Christmas Flea Market.

The snack bar will be open so you can take a break from shopping, sit down for a snack and visit with friends.

Bits and Pieces

It’s been a difficult time for the Sollman family. Happily, Sharline seems to be improving following her falls. She still hurts some, but it’s getting better. Right now, we’re just trying to stay warm.

But the greatest tragedy happened last Tuesday, December 3. I received a phone call from my sister in Tennessee. She had called to inform me that my younger brother, Patrick, had passed away. He had turned 79 on Sept. 3.

I hadn’t seen Pat since about 1995, when his wife, Barbara died. He had gotten himself an RV and was planning a trip to the Northwest to visit us. But it never happened.

Pat had been in declining health recently. He had diabetes, and had suffered some injuries in a car crash several years ago. Ultimately, he moved to Conroe, Texas, and lived with his son, Michael.

On the morning of Dec. 3, Michael discovered his father in the bathroom, dead. His older brother, Rick, told me that Pat had suffered a massive coronary event, which took him out quickly. For that I am thankful. At least he didn’t linger. He wouldn’t have liked that, and neither would his family.

His funeral service was held today, December 7, in Houston, TX. I would have liked to attend, but I was reluctant to leave Sharline home alone for an extended period.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be Thursday, January 16 at 6 p.m.

 

November 24, 2013

BAY CITY, November 24, 2013 --- I know, I’m late again. Things have been pretty rough the past few weeks. In addition to my preparing the Veterans Day program at the Air Museum, my wife, Sharline, took a tumble during the night, which earned her a trip to the hospital. More on that in Bits and Pieces. Getting old is certainly no fun.

Goal Setting Workshop

The Goal Setting workshop set a Town Hall meeting for Saturday, January 25, 2014, at 3 p.m. This will give our citizens an opportunity to tell the Council and Planning Commission members what they would like to see happen in Bay City.

John Gettman pointed out the need to improve the City’s water system, a need for which the City got an object lesson several weeks ago when a major waterline failed. There needs to be a shutoff valve for the high level reservoir on Baseline Road, and a telemetry system to tell the City when there is an abnormal flow of water from the reservoirs. Aging waterlines need to be scheduled and budgeted for replacement, and there are a lot of them. Most of the pipe was installed about 1980 and was guaranteed for 20 years. We’re on borrowed time.

Then there are our intersections with U.S. 101, all of which need to be improved. The Vision Plan, created about 10 years ago, needs to be dusted off and brought up to date. And it needs to be put into effect. Those things should be more that a bunch of words to make us look good to the ruling bureaucrats.

And, of course, our biggest need is to relocate our fire station out of the tsunami inundation zone.

There’ll be some visual aids prepared between now and then, and some refreshments will be served. The most important ingredient, however, needs to be provided by you, the Bay City resident or businessperson. We need your thoughts and ideas.

Emergency Preparedness

Our block captains are increasing in number, and Wendy Schink and Liane Welch are doing a terrific job developing this organization.

The block captains offer an excellent solution to the problem of communication during emergencies. Each captain knows all the families in his/her neighborhood, and their special needs. When something like a water outage occurs, the block captains can easily contact each residence to pass the word about the need to boil water, or whatever residents must do to get through the emergency.

And, better yet, the Fire Department will soon be installing a HAM radio base station. This will enable local HAM operators to communicate during emergencies. We are also talking about FRS radios, which do not require a license to operate. When we have a major catastrophe, we can expect that nothing will work. With out Fire Department generator and HAM base station, we will have a means of communicating within the City.

On November 13, Fire Chief Darrell Griffith conducted a tabletop exercise for a small emergency that morphed into an emergency that would involve Public Works. Gordon McCraw was on hand to offer guidance on the City’s relationship with the County upon activation of an Emergency Operations Center. Darrell broke off the tabletop exercise before its completion to go over some of the elements of the National Incident Management System, under which our emergency operations are conducted.

Darrell plans to conduct another tabletop exercise, this one to be carried out from start to completion. In the next exercise, Darrell said, we will role-play the responses and communicate just as we would during a real emergency. That means using phones, radios, dispatch, whatever.

Darrell hopes he can get the Nehalem group to present its FRS Radio course to our block captains and others who are interested.

The next meeting of the Emergency Preparedness Committee will be held at the Fire Station December 11, at 5:30 p.m.

Wendy and Liane also announced that the Block Captains, and anyone else interested in learning about the City’s Map Your Neighborhood grass roots emergency preparedness program, will meet Saturday, January 11, 2014, at the Fire Station, from 10 a.m. to noon. The agenda includes discussion of what support the Block Captains need when meeting their neighbors, command and communication structure, and FRS radio training. I’ll look forward to seeing you there.

Vacancies in City Government

The Planning Commission has filled one of its vacancies. Fred Rigwood has been appointed to the Planning Commission, and attended his first meeting November 20. That leaves one existing vacancy needing to be filled. Another is expected in the not-too-distant future. One of our members wishes to resign as soon as a replacement can be found. To apply, you need only fill out an application at the city office. Applicants may expect to be interviewed.

Fred comes to the Commission very well qualified. He served on the planning commission in Pasco, Washington, for several years, and he has some experience in construction. The Commission members look forward to working with Fred now that he is a member of the Commission.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters Club welcomes all who live in or near Bay City. The club meets the last Friday of the month, with special provisions for the months of November and December.

The November meeting was held Nov. 22, in view of the Thanksgiving holiday the following week. The meeting was thanksgiving-themed, the members bringing the ingredients for a traditional turkey dinner.

During the business portion of the meeting the members discussed their progress in getting Christmas lights for the City. Bay City resembles a black hole when compared to the other cities along U.S. 101 during the Christmas season. A major topic was a proposed annual Bay City Days festival, patterned after the Centennial held in 2010. Other matters discussed included a City-wide garage sale like the one held last July.

Because of the date, the 50th anniversary of the Kennedy assassination, many of the members shared their thoughts and experiences on that fateful day.

In view of the Christmas holiday in December, the Boosters will next meet December 20. Members should bring their potluck items between 11:30 and noon, and the formal meeting will start at noon. Actually, there will be no regular meeting per se, but rather a Christmas celebration, which will include a gift exchange.

Burning Suggestions

Burn permits for 2014 are now available at the City office. There is no charge for a burn permit.

And remember, please, that when you burn, you want a hot, clean fire. Please consider your neighbors when you burn. You don’t want to generate a lot of smelly smoke, which can be very annoying to them.

Veterans Day

We had a great Veterans Day observance at the Tillamook Air Museum, the best ever according to many who attended.

The audience was the largest we have ever experienced, and the show went off without a hitch. The audience loved the Buffalo Kitty Band, and I am told that a number of people were dancing in the rear of the “auditorium” as the band played. They did a great job.

Col. Bert Key gave an inspirational talk about the Vietnam War, and veterans of that war received gift certificates for a meal at Denny’s Restaurant.

The honor detail from the Garibaldi Coast Guard Station posted and retrieved the colors, accompanied by members of the Clan Macleay Pipe Band. That is a show all by itself.

VFW Post 2848 wishes to thank the management of the Tillamook Air Museum for their generous support of our efforts to honor veterans on their day. The Museum donated the net proceeds from the SOS Breakfast to the VFW, to be sent to the Veterans’ Home in The Dalles. This year, that amount was more than $600, more than any previous year.

Also, our thanks go to Denny’s Restaurant, TLC Credit Union, Irish’s Mooring Café in Garibaldi, and VFW Posts 1440 and 2994 for their financial support. The post also thanks the Rental Center for their generous discount on rental of tables and chairs for the event, and the Tillamook Eagles for the loan of 50 more chairs to accommodate our large audience. And a vote of thanks goes to Lonny Paul, Jr., for providing the flatbed trailer to haul the chairs to and from the Rental Center and the Eagles.

The Post also thanks Bert Key for his keynote speech, the Buffalo Kitty Band for their performance, the Coast Guard Honor Guard and members of Clan Macleay Pipe Band, Kathy Forbes, who sang the National Anthem and “God Bless America,” the High School and Community Choirs who sang the Service Anthems, and Karen Backman who played Taps. And, a special thanks to Col. Bill Hatton, USMCR, Retired, for serving as MC again this year.

Also, a special thanks goes to Burt Darnielle for bringing his Traveling Military Museum to the event. This year his display occupied 20 tables, and he is adding more military artifacts all the time.

With the Air Museum moving to Madras, we are uncertain about future Veterans Day celebrations. We may get one more year at the Blimp Hangar, and then again, we might not. We don’t know what the future holds for us. But right now, we put on the biggest Veterans Day program on the Oregon Coast, and the second largest in the state. Albany has us beat on that score.

But, members of our post would like to see the Blimp Hangar declared a historical building and retained. There has been talk of having it torn down. The blimp hangars up and down both coasts remind us how anti-submarine warfare was conducted during WWII. Blimps patrolled the coasts looking for submarines, which at that time were visible from the air when submerged. When I was with a squadron at Moffett Field in 1956, the Navy was still operating blimps. The Lighter-than-Air program ended soon after that.

Finally our VFW post thanks all the people who turned out for our program, braving the November chill inside the Blimp Hangar, to honor our veterans. As you can see from this report, putting on the Veterans Day show is no small undertaking. Our thanks again to all the people and organizations that pitched in to make the event a success.

City Council Activity

The City Council held its regular monthly meeting November 12.

Garibaldi Port Director Kevin Greenwood addressed the Council regarding maintenance and repair of the Tillamook Bay Jetty System. The Port of Garibaldi has received grants from several agencies to maintain the harbor and the jetties, according to Greenwood.

The Port is seeking funding and support from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the jetty system, which is essential to assure safe transit over the bar for Garibaldi’s commercial and recreational fishing fleets. The Council authorized Mayor Shaena Peterson to sign a letter of support for the Port’s request. Some Port property is located within the City of Bay City.

Susan Wagner, representing the Community Action Team, Inc., appeared before the Council seeking a memo of agreement to support the Team’s revolving zero percent loan program to fund needed home repairs for families meeting certain federal needs criteria. No payback is required until the home is sold or the title changes hands. The Council authorized the mayor to sign the memo of agreement supporting the program.

Public Works Superintendent David Pace, who did not attend the meeting, provided a written report that the Alderbrook river undercrossing had been finished, with just a few punch list items to be completed. Final payment request of $24,420.91 has been received.

David also reported that three bids for the second Kilchis River undercrossing had been received. Low bid of $633,238.10 was received from Kinnan Engineering, Inc. Other bid amounts were $996,251.42 from APEX Directional Drilling and $1,281,431.45 from HDD Co. City Attorney Lois Albright suggested accepting the low bid. The Council was uncertain when in-water work could be done in the Kilchis River.

A Public Works request to purchase an excavator was tabled and removed from the agenda. The Public Works request to purchase a flow meter to detect excess surface water in the wastewater collection system was deferred until December.

David’s report noted that Tillamook P.U.D. is asking $40,000 for the property on which the old substation was located. The property is needed, David said, to provide a private access for Public Works without having to drive through the Goose Point area. Attorney Albright noted that the $40,000 asking price gives the City lots of room to bargain.

In other business, the City forgave Christine Bolger the cost of 26,000 gallons of excess water caused by a faulty water meter, which was found to be entangled with tree roots.

The Council also appointed Dr. Fred Rigwood to the Planning Commission.

The Council authorized the mayor to sign the VEBA Employer Adoption Documents. VEBA, or the Voluntary Employees Beneficiary Association, is a health arrangement that allows an employer to contribute money to a trust on behalf if its employees to help pay for eligible medical expenses.

 

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace

ArtSpace has been renamed, “Fresh.” It’s official.

They serve smoothies and other goodies, according to the signs on one of the front windows. I’ve been meaning to get down there after a long hiatus to check it out, but there always seems to be a hotter brush fire that needs to be addressed. I did make it down there for the recent Wadley fundraiser. I noticed an attractive menu posted by the kitchen, so I believe the place is returning to its former self. Sharline and I will have to try a lunch down there soon.

Bay City Arts Center

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, Dec. 15. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. All levels are welcome.

Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend, but donations are welcome to help cover the cost of utilities.

Coming soon the Arts Center will be creating its Christmas Tree to be given to the Festival of Trees. As always, the BCAC Tree is made up from driftwood. To do this, the Arts Center needs donations of interesting pieces of driftwood. You my drop off your contributions at the Bay City Arts Center. More on this later, I hope.

The Board of Directors meets the first Monday of each month. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you want to get on the agenda, contact Dia Norris at gnorris@oregoncoast.com.

If you are an artist and would like to have your work displayed at the Arts Center, contact Terra Wilcoxen at the Arts Center, (503) 377-9620.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Latimer Quilt and Textile Center

The Latimer Quilt and Textile Center will present “Journey through Nature,” an exhibit by quilt artist June Jaeger, who has won numerous awards for her quilts. The exhibit runs from Nov. 4 through January 4, 2014. June will be at the open house set for Sunday, November 10, from noon to 4 p.m. She will be available to sign her latest book, “Adventures in Landscape Quilting.”

June is an Oregon native who was introduced to quilting in 1969. She owns her own company, Log Cabin Quiltworks, designs her own quilt patterns, and teaches throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Contact Linda Machuta at (503) 842-8622 or email her at latimertextile@centurylink.net for more information.

Newport Visual Arts Center

The Coast, a New Vision, Mixed Media Oil Paintings and Sand Dollar Mosaics

Mimi Cernyar Fox is exhibiting her new work, “The Coast, a New Vision,” from October 4 through December 1 in the Runyan Gallery. A reception for her was held October 4, and a second reception will be held Friday, November 1, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Mimi grew up in Mt. Angel, Oregon, and studied art at the Mt. Angel Acadamy. While living on the coast, she took painting classes from William Runyan, who encouraged her to obtain a formal degree. She received her BFA at Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland. She has taught community college classes at the VAC from 2004 through 2008. In 2004 she had an exhibition at the VAC called “Ocean Cowboys: The Fishermen and the Fleet.”

Her work was also featured in a 2008 exhibition at the Gallerie Etienne de Causans in Paris, France, and, more recently, at the Brian Marki Gallery, Blackfish Gallery, and Beppu/Wyardia Gallery in Portland. Her work is currently displayed at the Sun Rose Gallery in Seaside, Oregon.

Mimi has almost always lived by the sea, and she is married to a fisherman. Her current work relies on images of the sea, or from the sea. Her new sand dollar paintings/mosaics are “absolutely inspiring.” Her highly textured paintings glitter with sand, encouraging one to think about our delicate sea life.

The Runyan Gallery is on the first floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. through October, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. November through April.

Oregon Council for the Arts is a nonprofit arts organization and the regional arts council for Curry, Coos, Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsop Counties, and the coastal towns of Douglas and Lane Counties. OCCA brings high quality arts experiences to the Coast. The Coastal Oregon Visual Artists Showcase features mid-career artists within the arts council.

The Newport Visual Arts Center is located at 777 NW Beach Drive on the beach in the historic Nye Beach area of Newport. For further information about the Newport Visual Arts Center and the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, go to the Links page and click on the link for the Center, or call OCCA VAC Director Sally Houck at (541) 265-6569.

Kiwanda Community Center

The Kiwanda Community Center will be holding its Christmas Bazaar Saturday and Sunday, December 7 and 8, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be baked items, handmade gifts, arts, crafts, Christmas decorations and other seasonal items for its Christmas Flea Market.

The snack bar will be open so you can take a break from shopping, sit down for a snack and visit with friends.

Bits and Pieces

It’s been a rough time for the Sollman family. Sharline took another spill a week ago, in the middle of the night, and got to ride in the hospital chariot. Some ride. I’ve been in it, and it reminds me of riding in a crackerbox ambulance over a Korean road.

The x-rays didn’t show any obvious breaks, but she certainly is battered and bruised. Her right cheekbone has a shiner you wouldn’t believe. But I’m happy to report that she seems to be on the mend. Her ribs still hurt when she gets up or sits down, but not quite so badly as early on.

On Thursday, we commemorated the 50th anniversary of the Kennedy assassination. That’s a day I remember vividly. We were winding up our lunch hour at the Boston Navy Building when Adeline Albert, my secretary, came loping in, all excited, exclaiming that Jackie Kennedy had been shot. On came a radio, and we listened to the news. We soon learned that it was not Jackie, but Jack, who was shot. With word of his death a short while later, the office became deathly silent. Little work got done that afternoon. When I drove home to Marblehead, through Boston rush hour traffic, the silence was deafening. Not a sound. The traffic proceeded in an uncharacteristically polite manner; nobody tried to cut in ahead of you and everyone took his turn waiting to pay the toll to enter the Sumner Tunnel. I’ve never experienced anything like it. It is if the whole country was in shock.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be December 19 at 6 p.m.

 

November 4, 2013

BAY CITY, November 4, 2013 --- I’m running late, but what else is new! The big news this week is our preparations for the 17th annual Veterans Day celebration at the Tillamook Air Museum. This is no small undertaking, and it takes many hands to put it together. My thanks to everyone who has helped.

Goal Setting Workshop

The Goal Setting workshop set a Town Hall meeting for Saturday, January 25, 2014, at 3 p.m. This will give our citizens an opportunity to tell the Council and Planning Commission members what they would like to see happen in Bay City.

John Gettman pointed out the need to improve the City’s water system, a need for which the City got an object lesson several weeks ago when a major waterline failed. There needs to be a shutoff valve for the high level reservoir on Baseline Road, and a telemetry system to tell the City when there is an abnormal flow of water from the reservoirs. Aging waterlines need to be replaced, and there are a lot of them.

Then there are our intersections with U.S. 101, all of which need to be improved. The Vision Plan, created about 10 years ago, needs to be dusted off and brought up to date.

And, of course, our biggest need is to relocate our fire station out of the tsunami inundation zone.

There’ll be some visual aids prepared between now and then, and some refreshments will be served. The most important ingredient, however, needs to be provided by you, the Bay City resident or businessperson. We need your thoughts and ideas.

Emergency Preparedness

The next Emergency Preparedness meeting will take place at the fire station Nov. 13 at 5:30 p.m. We’re looking to add some more block captains for the Map Your Neighborhood project. Block captains are the key to survival in an emergency situation, whether of short or long duration. The recent water outage is a prime example. There has been much discussion about informing the public, and no really good way to notify everybody.

The block captains offer an excellent solution to that problem. Each captain knows all the families in his/her neighborhood, and their special needs. When something like a water outage occurs, the block captains can easily contact each residence to pass the word about the need to boil water, or whatever residents must do to get through the emergency.

Wendy Schink and Liane Welch have been doing an excellent job of recruiting block captains, and soon we can look forward to having an organization to rival our neighbors in the Nehalem Bay area. Wendy and Liane are holding regular block captain meetings to work out the program.

Wendy reports that she has added four more block captains to the list. She plans a block captain meeting at City Hall Nov. 13, at the same time the Emergency Preparedness meeting is taking place. While the block captains are working out their communication procedures, the Emergency Preparedness Committee will be conducting a table top exercise to familiarize themselves with the operation of the National Incident Command System.

Vacancies in City Government

The Planning Commission is about to fill one of its vacancies. Fred Rigwood has presented an application for appointment to the Commission, and the Planning Commission recommended to the City Council that he be appointed to fill one of the vacancies. That leaves one existing vacancy needing to be filled, and another is expected in the not-too-distant future. One of our members wishes to resign as soon as a replacement can be found. To apply to fill a vacancy, you need only fill out an application at the city office. Applicants may expect to be interviewed.

Fred comes to the Commission very well qualified. He served on the planning commission in Pasco, Washington, for several years, and he has some experience in construction. The Commission members look forward to working with Fred when the City Council approves his appointment.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters Club welcomes all who live in or near Bay City. The club meets the last Friday of the month, with special provisions for the months of November and December.

The November meeting will be held Nov. 22, in view of the Thanksgiving holiday the following week. The members bring their potluck food items at 11:30, and the formal meeting starts at noon. Items for the post-meeting auction are also welcome. The meeting generally lasts until 1 p.m. or so. Come on down, we’d love to see you.

The meeting held Oct. 25 was devoted mainly to planning the Wadley fundraiser set for the following day.

Burning Suggestions

I think our dry weather has come to an end. Nothing is forever. But it sure was nice while it lasted.

Although the summer burn restrictions are no longer in effect, I thought it a good time to put out a few reminders about burning --- and burning courtesy. This is most important now that the fall rains have set in.

Every now and again, someone puts something in a burn barrel that doesn’t belong there. Basically, a burn barrel is for burning paper products or dry yard waste, such as woody cuttings, dry berry canes and the like. But even dry yard waste will smolder and produce smoke if it gets rained on.

Cut green grass and green cuttings should never be “burned” in a barrel. They’ll just sit there and smolder, generally with an abundance of smoke. They should be piled in a convenient corner of the property and allowed to decompose. You’ll get some great mulch in the process.

And, please don’t burn plastics or tar-based products. They make lots of thick, black smoke, and they smolder forever. It’s rather like burning tires. Once the fire starts burning, it’s really a challenge to extinguish. And it will stink.

And don’t think that dry wood is always OK to burn. Wood painted with latex paint can make some unpleasant smoke as the latex burns off.

One of the most important things to remember when burning in a barrel is to allow an adequate amount of breathing space. If you pack the barrel tightly, there will be an inadequate supply of air to support combustion, and the contents will smolder and produce lots of smoke.

Paper burns well if it’s very loose in the barrel. But if you were to try to light a book on fire, you’d find it a lot like trying to light a wood log with a match. Paper doesn’t burn easily if it’s packed tightly together. If you were to watch it burn, you’d see that it tends to burn one page at a time. It’s best to crumple it first to create some air space.

If I have cereal boxes, I generally put them in the barrel first, so that there is space for air to enter the barrel at the bottom. I generally use a piece of paper towel as a wick, stuck through a hole at the bottom of the barrel. I wet it with a little charcoal lighter to carry the fire into the barrel quickly. From that point, nature will take its course. If the barrel is loosely packed, you’ll get a good, hot fire and little, if any, smoke.

Also, remember that you must always cover the barrel with a screen to keep embers from flying out. Screens tend to disintegrate after a few uses, so I always plunk down a few dollars at Rosenberg’s and by a screened cover. These last much longer, but not forever.

And lastly, be sure you have a current burn permit. Come January, you’ll need to get a new one for 2014, and they are available now at City Hall.

Veterans Day

The Tillamook Air Museum and VFW Post 2848 will host the 17th annual Veterans Day celebration Monday, November 11, 2013. The event kicks off with a traditional military SOS breakfast. Anyone who has worn the uniform has fond memories for this epicurean delicacy.

The breakfast will cost $7 at the door, and it’s worth every penny of it. The Air Museum contributes proceeds from the breakfast to the Veterans’ Home in The Dalles. But the ceremony is free. Moreover, veterans may visit the Air Museum all day at no charge.

The ceremony will begin at 9:30 a.m. with the parading and posting of the colors by the Coast Guard and members of the Clan Macleay Pipe Band. Retired Marine Corps Col. Bill Hatton will serve as Master of Ceremonies again this year.

The ceremony honors all veterans, but this year veterans of the Vietnam War will be celebrated. It’s a recognition long overdue, since the veterans’ reception upon their return from that war, with anti-war sentiment at the boiling point, might charitably be described as hostile. Then, it seems, the soldier got blamed for a war in which he had been drafted to serve. Happily, today, people come up to veterans and thank them for their service.

Our keynote speaker will be retired Army colonel Bert Key, a Vietnam veteran and past VFW State Commander. Principal musical entertainment will be provided by Joel Baker’s Buffalo Kitty Band. Kathy Forbes will sing the National Anthem and “God Bless America.” The Tillamook High School and Community Choirs will sing the service anthems to recognize veterans of each of the armed services.

We will be privileged to have Burt Darnielle’s Traveling Military Museum, with its artifacts from all the wars in which the United States has been involved, including the Revolutionary War. Burt is a veteran of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars.

Finally, if the weather conditions are favorable, there will be a flyover of a WWII war bird or two. There’s nothing like seeing a Mustang or a Corsair in flight.

And, there are some other Veterans’ events taking place between now and Veterans Day. On Friday, Nov. 8, at 9:30 a.m., East Elementary and Middle Schools are putting on their annual veterans’ school assembly. They always do a fine job welcoming our Tillamook County veterans.

Then, at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 8, the Tillamook Elks Lodge will hold its annual spaghetti dinner for veterans. Veterans and their families eat for free, and there are generally a few drawings for prizes.

Denny’s Restaurant is sponsoring its Shining Star program for the third year. People dining at Denny’s may purchase a Shining Star in honor of their favorite veteran. The stars remain posted on the wall in the entrance area until after Veterans Day. Purchase of a star is by donation. The entire proceeds go to the VFW Post and its Auxiliary Unit to support their programs for veterans.

VFW Post 2848 and the Tillamook Air Museum wish to thank Denny’s Restaurant, TLC Credit Union and Irish’s Moorage Café in Garibaldi for their co-sponsorship of the Veterans Day program. Others have also contributed to sponsorship of the event, but, sadly, I don’t yet know who they are. But we thank everyone who has contributed to make our celebration possible.

 

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace

ArtSpace has been renamed, “Fresh.” It’s official.

They serve smoothies and other goodies, according to the signs on one of the front windows. I’ve been meaning to get down there after a long hiatus to check it out, but there always seems to be a hotter brush fire that needs to be addressed. I did make it down there for the recent Wadley fundraiser. I noticed an attractive menu posted by the kitchen, so I believe the place is returning to its former self. Sharline and I will have to try a lunch down there soon.

Bay City Arts Center

BCAC presented Discovery in Stone 2013 Oct. 26 and 27, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. This was the third year the Arts Center has offered the stone-carving workshop. The workshop was made possible by a generous grant from the Siletz Tribal Charitable Contribution Fund.

November 2, a Saturday, BCAC honored Marie Antoinette’s birthday with a Cake Festival. The good queen, hearing that her subjects had no bread to eat, said: “Then let them eat cake!”

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, Nov. 17. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

BCAC will hold its annual fundraising event Saturday, November 23, at 6 p.m. This year’s event will be a Night at the Casbah, featuring Moroccan foods and even live belly dancing. Tickets are $20 apiece, and only 50 will be sold, so get yours early. You don’t want to miss out on this.

Open Studio: BCAC is open for artistic exploration Wednesday evenings from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your own materials and make some art!

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. All levels are welcome.

Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend, but donations are welcome to help cover the cost of utilities.

The Board of Directors meets the first Monday of each month. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you want to get on the agenda, contact Dia Norris at gnorris@oregoncoast.com.

If you are an artist and would like to have your work displayed at the Arts Center, contact Terra Wilcoxen at the Arts Center, (503) 377-9620.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Latimer Quilt and Textile Center

The Latimer Quilt and Textile Center will present “Journey through Nature,” an exhibit by quilt artist June Jaeger, who has won numerous awards for her quilts. The exhibit runs from Nov. 4 through January 4, 2014. June will be at the open house set for Sunday, November 10, from noon to 4 p.m. She will be available to sign her latest book, “Adventures in Landscape Quilting.”

June is an Oregon native who was introduced to quilting in 1969. She owns her own company, Log Cabin Quiltworks, designs her own quilt patterns, and teaches throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Contact Linda Machuta at (503) 842-8622 or email her at latimertextile@centurylink.net for more information.

Newport Visual Arts Center

The Coast, a New Vision, Mixed Media Oil Paintings and Sand Dollar Mosaics

Mimi Cernyar Fox is exhibiting her new work, “The Coast, a New Vision,” from October 4 through December 1 in the Runyan Gallery. A reception for her was held October 4, and a second reception will be held Friday, November 1, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Mimi grew up in Mt. Angel, Oregon, and studied art at the Mt. Angel Acadamy. While living on the coast, she took painting classes from William Runyan, who encouraged her to obtain a formal degree. She received her BFA at Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland. She has taught community college classes at the VAC from 2004 through 2008. In 2004 she had an exhibition at the VAC called “Ocean Cowboys: The Fishermen and the Fleet.”

Her work was also featured in a 2008 exhibition at the Gallerie Etienne de Causans in Paris, France, and, more recently, at the Brian Marki Gallery, Blackfish Gallery, and Beppu/Wyardia Gallery in Portland. Her work is currently displayed at the Sun Rose Gallery in Seaside, Oregon.

Mimi has almost always lived by the sea, and she is married to a fisherman. Her current work relies on images of the sea, or from the sea. Her new sand dollar paintings/mosaics are “absolutely inspiring.” Her highly textured paintings glitter with sand, encouraging one to think about our delicate sea life.

The Runyan Gallery is on the first floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. through October, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. November through April.

Oregon Council for the Arts is a nonprofit arts organization and the regional arts council for Curry, Coos, Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsop Counties, and the coastal towns of Douglas and Lane Counties. OCCA brings high quality arts experiences to the Coast. The Coastal Oregon Visual Artists Showcase features mid-career artists within the arts council.

The Newport Visual Arts Center is located at 777 NW Beach Drive on the beach in the historic Nye Beach area of Newport. For further information about the Newport Visual Arts Center and the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, go to the Links page and click on the link for the Center, or call OCCA VAC Director Sally Houck at (541) 265-6569.

Bits and Pieces

It’s been a busy time for me lately, and until after the Vets Day celebration at the Air Museum is done, it’s going to be crunch time.

But I’m happy to report that mama and the twins are alive and well. The little guys have lost their spots and are no longer so little. In fact they’re getting pretty big. I saw them several days ago when I came home from the Air Museum.

Thanks to my daughter and son-in-law, we got our yard cleaned up and ready for fall and winter. It’s nice to have kids who care when you get old. Sharline and I are blessed with three of them.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be November 21 at 6 p.m.

 

October 27, 2013

BAY CITY, October 27, 2013 --- I was going to publish this yesterday, but decided to wait until the results of the Wadley Fundraiser. The community can be justly proud!

Wadley Fund Raiser

The Bay City Boosters and the Fire Department hosted a hamburger, hot dog and potato salad BBQ at the Community Hall Saturday.

Booster president Linda Vining wishes to thank the Boosters who gave of their time to help make the event a success. Helping during the event were: Gretchen and John Power, Terry and Diane Griffin, Valorie Greenfield, Gail Reese, Norma Kimball, Robin Peale and Lynn. And, Linda said, a special thank you to Marilyn Reynolds.

Linda thanked the Bay City Fire Department for doing cooking and helping with anything that needed to be done, including scrubbing pots and pans!! “They rock!!” she exclaimed.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith said 15 volunteer firefighters and three youngsters helped with the setup and take-down, and handled the cooking, working in several shifts.

Linda also thanks Dick Crossley of The Smoker for donating the hamburgers and hot dogs; and Helen Wright of The Landing for the potato salad, condiments, paper plates, turkey roaster, tomatoes, onions and lettuce. Linda also expressed her thanks to the Booster members, who donated various other supplies for the fundraiser.

In addition to the eats, there was a silent auction to help the Wadley family. Auction items ranged from potted flower and plant arrangements to nights at coastal vacation spots, freshly baked pies, picture framing and an antique Singer sewing machine.

Items for the silent auction were donated by: Diane Zink and Becky Smith, Gretchen and John Power, Gloria Heske, Linda Vining, Gail Reese, Diane and Terry Griffin, Valorie Greenfield, Trisha Kaufmann, Charlene Dennison, Hazel Downie, Robin and Bill Peale, Ardith Stout, Allen Leach, Karen Rust and Jim Allenbrand, Kathi and Gary Klenski, the Downie girls, Jen and Joanie, and the Wadley Family.

There was also a 50/50 raffle.

After deducting expenses, and there were some, the event netted roughly $2,270. That amount includes the silent auction, which yielded about $1,000, and the raffle which produced $171. The remaining $1,099 consisted mainly of contributions taken at the door and donations from some who were unable to attend in person.

I was pleased to see Glen Wadley at the event, accompanied by his two daughters, Tracy Nuzum and Vicki Mintz. Glen is recovering from the stroke he suffered last April.

“It’s an amazing group of people to make this such a successful fundraiser. Thank you all so much!!!!!” said Linda Vining.

I’d like to get a word in here as well. It’s great to see a community come together to help one of its own. And that’s what happened Saturday. Let me add a word of appreciation to Trisha and Craig Kaufman, who raised money at their pasta feed earlier in October. I don’t know the amount they raised, but when I learn, I’ll pass it on.

Goal Setting Workshop

The Goal Setting workshop set a Town Hall meeting for Saturday, January 25, 2014, at 3 p.m. This will give our citizens an opportunity to tell the Council and Planning Commission members what they would like to see happen in Bay City.

John Gettman pointed out the need to improve the City’s water system, a need for which the City got an object lesson several weeks ago when a major waterline failed. There needs to be a shutoff valve for the high level reservoir on Baseline Road, and a telemetry system to tell the City when there is an abnormal flow of water from the reservoirs. Aging waterlines need to be replaced, and there are a lot of them.

Then there are our intersections with U.S. 101, all of which need to be improved. The Vision Plan, created about 10 years ago, needs to be dusted off and brought up to date.

And, of course, our biggest need is to relocate our fire station out of the tsunami inundation zone.

There’ll be some visual aids prepared between now and then, and some refreshments will be served. The most important ingredient, however, needs to be provided by you, the Bay City resident or businessperson. We need your thoughts and ideas.

Emergency Preparedness

The next Emergency Preparedness meeting will take place at the fire station Nov. 13 at 5:30 p.m. We’re looking to add some more block captains for the Map Your Neighborhood project. Block captains are the key to survival in an emergency situation, whether of short or long duration. The recent water outage is a prime example. There has been much discussion about informing the public, and no really good way to notify everybody.

The block captains offer an excellent solution to that problem. Each captain knows all the families in his/her neighborhood, and their special needs. When something like a water outage occurs, the block captains can easily contact each residence to pass the word about the need to boil water, or whatever residents must do to get through the emergency.

Wendy Schink and Liane Welch have been doing an excellent job of recruiting block captains, and soon we can look forward to having an organization to rival our neighbors in the Nehalem Bay area. Wendy and Liane are holding regular block captain meetings to work out the program.

Vacancies in City Government

The Planning Commission is about to fill one of its vacancies. Fred Rigwood has presented an application for appointment to the Commission, and the Planning Commission recommended to the City Council that he be appointed to fill one of the vacancies. That leaves one existing vacancy needing to be filled, and another is expected in the not-too-distant future. One of our members wishes to resign as soon as a replacement can be found. To apply to fill a vacancy, you need only fill out an application at the city office. Applicants may expect to be interviewed.

Fred comes to the Commission very well qualified. He served on the planning commission in Pasco, Washington, for several years, and he has some experience in construction. The Commission members look forward to working with Fred when the City Council approves his appointment.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters Club welcomes all who live in or near Bay City. The club meets the last Friday of the month, with special provisions for the months of November and December.

The November meeting will be held Nov. 22, in view of the Thanksgiving holiday the following week. The members bring their potluck food items at 11:30, and the formal meeting starts at noon. Items for the post-meeting auction are also welcome. The meeting generally lasts until 1 p.m. or so. Come on down, we’d love to see you.

The meeting held Oct. 25 was devoted mainly to planning the Wadley fundraiser set for the following day.

Burning Restrictions

With all the rain we’ve had recently, I’m happy to say that our burning restrictions are over for the year, except if we were to suddenly experience a severe drought and hot weather. Somehow I don’t think that will happen.

Remember to have a charged hose nearby if you are open burning.

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace

ArtSpace has been renamed, “Fresh.” It’s official.

They serve smoothies and other goodies, according to the signs on one of the front windows. I’ve been meaning to get down there after a long hiatus to check it out, but there always seems to be a hotter brush fire that needs to be addressed. I did make it down there for the recent Wadley fundraiser. I noticed an attractive menu posted by the kitchen, so I believe the place is returning to its former self. Sharline and I will have to try a lunch down there soon.

 

Bay City Arts Center

The Artist of the Month for October is artist and instructor Sheri E. Smith, who will be showing her basket weaving throughout the month. Sheri put on a fabulous workshop on weaving with pine needles earlier in October.

BCAC presented Discovery in Stone 2013 Oct. 26 and 27, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. This was the third year the Arts Center has offered the stone-carving workshop. The workshop was made possible by a generous grant from the Siletz Tribal Charitable Contribution Fund.

November 2, a Saturday, BCAC honors Marie Antoinette’s birthday with a Cake Festival. Let’s do what the good queen told her subjects to do when they complained that they had no bread to eat: “Then let them eat cake!” So, let’s have our cake! Details later.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, Nov. 17. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

BCAC will hold its annual fundraising event Saturday, November 23, at 6 p.m. This year’s event will be a Night at the Casbah, featuring Moroccan foods and even live belly dancing. Tickets are $20 apiece, and only 50 will be sold, so get yours early. You don’t want to miss out on this.

Open Studio: BCAC is open for artistic exploration Wednesday evenings from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your own materials and make some art!

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. All levels are welcome.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend, but donations are welcome to help cover the cost of utilities.

The Board of Directors meets the first Monday of each month. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you want to get on the agenda, contact Dia Norris at gnorris@oregoncoast.com.

If you are an artist and would like to have your work displayed at the Arts Center, contact Terra Wilcoxen at the Arts Center, (503) 377-9620.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Latimer Quilt and Textile Center

The Latimer Quilt and Textile Center will present “Journey through Nature,” an exhibit by quilt artist June Jaeger, who has won numerous awards for her quilts. The exhibit runs from Nov. 4 through January 4, 2014. June will be at the open house set for Sunday, November 10, from noon to 4 p.m. She will be available to sign her latest book, “Adventures in Landscape Quilting.”

June is an Oregon native who was introduced to quilting in 1969. She owns her own company, Log Cabin Quiltworks, designs her own quilt patterns, and teaches throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Contact Linda Machuta at (503) 842-8622 or email her at latimertextile@centurylink.net for more information.

Newport Visual Arts Center

The Coast, a New Vision, Mixed Media Oil Paintings and Sand Dollar Mosaics

Mimi Cernyar Fox is exhibiting her new work, “The Coast, a New Vision,” from October 4 through December 1 in the Runyan Gallery. A reception for her was held October 4, and a second reception will be held Friday, November 1, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Mimi grew up in Mt. Angel, Oregon, and studied art at the Mt. Angel Acadamy. While living on the coast, she took painting classes from William Runyan, who encouraged her to obtain a formal degree. She received her BFA at Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland. She has taught community college classes at the VAC from 2004 through 2008. In 2004 she had an exhibition at the VAC called “Ocean Cowboys: The Fishermen and the Fleet.”

Her work was also featured in a 2008 exhibition at the Gallerie Etienne de Causans in Paris, France, and, more recently, at the Brian Marki Gallery, Blackfish Gallery, and Beppu/Wyardia Gallery in Portland. Her work is currently displayed at the Sun Rose Gallery in Seaside, Oregon.

Mimi has almost always lived by the sea, and she is married to a fisherman. Her current work relies on images of the sea, or from the sea. Her new sand dollar paintings/mosaics are “absolutely inspiring.” Her highly textured paintings glitter with sand, encouraging one to think about our delicate sea life.

The Runyan Gallery is on the first floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. through October, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. November through April.

River Mantra

Tillamook County artist Christine Harrison will exhibit “River Mantra,” pastel drawings, and acrylic and oil paintings in the Coastal Oregon Visual Artists’ Showcase on the second floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center through October 26. There will be an opening reception for Christine Friday, September 6, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Christine is a painter and sculptor. Her most recent sculpture project, three large cement cows, was a joint venture with Heidi Clemens and the 2010 Ford Family Foundation Tillamook Leadership Candidates. The cows are prominently displayed at three locations in Tillamook County.

Christine has a Masters in Fine Arts earned at the College of Fine Arts in Oakland, California. She has created an intergenerational art program for underserved populations of senior citizens and inner city public school children. Her work is imbued with a power of nature theme. Her works have been shown in one-person exhibits in many locations in the Unites States.

She will be the featured speaker at the September Exhibition Coffee for Docents and Volunteers, and anyone interested in volunteering at the Visual Arts Center at 11 a.m. October 10 in Room 302, Visual Arts Center.

The Visual Arts Showcase, an outreach program featuring mid-career visual artists, is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.

Oregon Council for the Arts is a nonprofit arts organization and the regional arts council for Curry, Coos, Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsop Counties, and the coastal towns of Douglas and Lane Counties. OCCA brings high quality arts experiences to the Coast. The Coastal Oregon Visual Artists Showcase features mid-career artists within the arts council.

The Newport Visual Arts Center is located at 777 NW Beach Drive on the beach in the historic Nye Beach area of Newport. For further information about the Newport Visual Arts Center and the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, go to the Links page and click on the link for the Center, or call OCCA VAC Director Sally Houck at (541) 265-6569.

Kiwanda Children’s Halloween Party

The Kiwanda Community Center will hold its annual Children’s Halloween Party Thursday, October 31, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at the Community Center. The party this year will be hosted by the Nestucca Valley High School Student Body.

There will be games, prizes, face painting and a cake walk.

The Nesko Women’s Club and the Nestucca Valley Lions Club will be kicking off their 2013 Christmas Basket program. So, please bring a non-perishable food donation for the food drive.

Bits and Pieces

I hadn’t seen our local deer for some time, until this morning, that is. One of the twins was resting in my back yard. My neighbor said she saw the twins and mama sauntering up Portland Avenue several days ago. I’d sure rather they would keep to the back trails.

But this week, I did truly endure what would charitably be described as a day from hell. Terry Griffin and I went to the Officers’ Mess at the old Naval Air Station to attend a meeting hosted by Rep. Kurt Schrader, dealing with the National Flood Insurance Program.

As I entered the building, I failed to note that the threshold is elevated significantly above the level of the porch, and I caught it with my foot and went down like a pole-axed steer. I still have the strawberry on my forehead to remind me to watch my step next time.

I got home just before my daughter and son-in-law arrived to help mow the lawn and take care of a few other chores about the house. The grass was still a bit wet from morning dew, so I suggested we all go to lunch at Downie’s while the yard was drying out. When I arrived at Downie’s, I was aghast to find that my house keys were not in my pants pocket. So, when we got back home, I had to break into my own house. I’ll not tell you how I did it, but suffice it to say that I got in and the damage done to the house was quickly repaired.

Three days later I discovered the extra key I had made for such an event. It was sitting on top of my record player, where I had put it several years ago, intending to put it in a secure place so I could get into my house the next time I locked myself out. I hate getting old!

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be November 21 at 6 p.m.

 

 

 

October 20, 2013

Bay City Grapevine

BAY CITY, October 20, 2013 --- I thought fall had hit us hard with that rainy period in September. But it looks like we’re now having an extra heaping of Indian Summer weather. It’s nice while it lasts, so enjoy it while you can.

Judy Wadley Fund Raisers

There is one more fundraiser in the offing. The Bay City Boosters Club and the Fire Department will host a hamburger, hot dog and potato salad dinner at the Community Hall Saturday, October 26. In addition to the eats, there will be a silent auction to help the Wadley family. This event will run from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., and cost of admission is a donation.

I’m told that the meat items are being donated by the Smoker, and the potato salad by The Landing. If you would like to donate something for the silent auction, contact Linda Vining at (503) 377-2257, or Gretchen Power at (503) 377-2113.

Judy gave her all for the Bay City post office. Let’s all pitch in and help the Wadley family through the hardship they now face. You’ll be glad you did.

Goal Setting Workshop

There will be a Goal Setting workshop at 6 p.m. Tuesday, October 22, in the Council chambers. I had previously said it would be a Town Hall, but I was in error. They had talked about doing a Town Hall, but for the time, we’re sticking to the workshop format.

The City Council will hold a special meeting at 5:30 p.m., before the Goal Setting workshop, to accept bids for the upper Kilchis River crossing project.

Emergency Preparedness

The next Emergency Preparedness meeting will take place at the fire station Nov. 13 at 5:30 p.m. We’re looking to add some more block captains for the Map Your Neighborhood project. Block captains are the key to survival in an emergency situation, whether of short or long duration. The recent water outage is a prime example. There has been lots of discussion about informing the public, and no really good way to notify everybody.

The block captains offer an excellent solution to that problem. Each captain knows all the families in his/her neighborhood, and their special needs. When something like a water outage occurs, the block captains can easily contact each residence to pass the word about the need to boil water, or whatever residents must do to get through the emergency.

Wendy Schink and Liane  Welch have been doing an excellent job of recruiting block captains, and soon we can look forward to having an organization to rival our neighbors in the Nehalem Bay area.

Vacancies in City Government

We now have two vacancies on the Planning Commission, and another is expected in the not-too-distant future. One of our members wishes to resign as soon as a replacement can be found. To apply to fill these vacancies, you need only fill out an application at the city office. Applicants may expect to be interviewed. We expect more land use issues to arise as the economy improves, and we’ll need a full Commission. Presently, we’re finishing up on making text amendments to the Development Ordinance.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters Club welcomes all who live in or near Bay City. The club meets the last Friday of the month, with special provisions for the months of November and December. The next meeting will be October 26. The members bring their potluck food items at 11:30, and the formal meeting starts at noon. The meeting generally lasts until 1 p.m. or so. Come on down, we’d love to see you.

Burning Restrictions

With all the rain we’ve had recently, I’m happy to say that our burning restrictions are over for the year, except if we were to suddenly experience a severe drought and hot weather. Somehow I don’t think that will happen.

Remember to have a charged hose nearby if you are open burning.

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace

ArtSpace has been renamed, “Fresh.” It’s official.

They serve smoothies and other goodies, according to the signs on one of the front windows. I’ve been meaning to get down there after a long hiatus to check it out, but there always seems to be a hotter brush fire that needs to be addressed. I did make it down there for the recent Wadley fundraiser. I noticed an attractive menu posted by the kitchen, so I believe the place is returning to its former self. Sharline and I will have to try a lunch down there soon.

Bay City Arts Center

The Artist of the Month for October is artist and instructor Sheri E. Smith, who will be showing her basket weaving throughout the month. Sheri put on a fabulous workshop last weekend on weaving with pine needles.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, Nov. 17. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

BCAC presents Discovery in Stone 2013 Oct. 26 and 27, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Community members are invited to attend this two-day outdoor hand stone carving workshop. This will be the third year the Arts Center has offered the stone carving workshop. All materials will be provided, and instructors will be there to provide information and guidance. Participants are encouraged to bring a potluck item for lunch. Tuition is by donation. The workshop is made possible by a generous grant from the Siletz Tribal Charitable Contribution Fund. For further information and to make a reservation, call Charlie Wooldridge at (503) 377-9620.

November 2, a Saturday, BCAC honors Marie Antoinette’s birthday with a Cake Festival. Let’s do what the good queen told her subjects to do when they complained that they had no bread to eat: “Then let them eat cake!” So, let’s have our cake! Details later.

Open Studio: BCAC is open for artistic exploration Wednesday evenings from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your own materials and make some art!

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. All levels are welcome.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend, but donations are welcome to help cover the cost of utilities.

The Board of Directors meets the first Monday of each month. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you want to get on the agenda, contact Dia Norris at gnorris@oregoncoast.com.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

The Arts Center has run into difficulties with its Web site. But you can still access the Arts Center’s Facebook page. The Arts Center is continuing to work on its Web site, but if you have questions, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

 

Latimer Quilt and Textile Center

The Latimer Quilt and Textile Center will present “Journey through Nature,” an exhibit by quilt artist June Jaeger, who has won numerous awards for her quilts. The exhibit runs from Nov. 4 through January 4, 2014. June will be at the open house set for Sunday, November 10, from noon to 4 p.m. She will be available to sign her latest book, “Adventures in Landscape Quilting.”

June is an Oregon native who was introduced to quilting in 1969. She owns her own company, Log Cabin Quiltworks, designs her own quilt patterns, and teaches throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Contact Linda Machuta at (503) 842-8622 or email her at latimertextile@centurylink.net for more information.

Newport Visual Arts Center

The Coast, a New Vision, Mixed Media Oil Paintings and Sand Dollar Mosaics

Mimi Cernyar Fox is exhibiting her new work, “The Coast, a New Vision,” from October 4 through December 1 in the Runyan Gallery. A reception for her was held October 4, and a second reception will be held Friday, November 1, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Mimi grew up in Mt. Angel, Oregon, and studied art at the Mt. Angel Acadamy. While living on the coast, she took painting classes from William Runyan, who encouraged her to obtain a formal degree. She received her BFA at Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland. She has taught community college classes at the VAC from 2004 through 2008. In 2004 she had an exhibition at the VAC called “Ocean Cowboys: The Fishermen and the Fleet.”

Her work was also featured in a 2008 exhibition at the Gallerie Etienne de Causans in Paris, France, and, more recently, at the Brian Marki Gallery, Blackfish Gallery, and Beppu/Wyardia Gallery in Portland. Her work is currently displayed at the Sun Rose Gallery in Seaside, Oregon.

Mimi has almost always lived by the sea, and she is married to a fisherman. Her current work relies on images of the sea, or from the sea. Her new sand dollar paintings/mosaics are “absolutely inspiring.” Her highly textured paintings glitter with sand, encouraging one to think about our delicate sea life.

The Runyan Gallery is on the first floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. through October, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. November through April.

River Mantra

Tillamook County artist Christine Harrison will exhibit “River Mantra,” pastel drawings, and acrylic and oil paintings in the Coastal Oregon Visual Artists’ Showcase on the second floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center through October 26. There will be an opening reception for Christine Friday, September 6, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Christine is a painter and sculptor. Her most recent sculpture project, three large cement cows, was a joint venture with Heidi Clemens and the 2010 Ford Family Foundation Tillamook Leadership Candidates. The cows are prominently displayed at three locations in Tillamook County.

Christine has a Masters in Fine Arts earned at the College of Fine Arts in Oakland, California. She has created an intergenerational art program for underserved populations of senior citizens and inner city public school children. Her work is imbued with a power of nature theme. Her works have been shown in one-person exhibits in many locations in the Unites States.

She will be the featured speaker at the September Exhibition Coffee for Docents and Volunteers, and anyone interested in volunteering at the Visual Arts Center at 11 a.m. October 10 in Room 302, Visual Arts Center.

The Visual Arts Showcase, an outreach program featuring mid-career visual artists, is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.

Oregon Council for the Arts is a nonprofit arts organization and the regional arts council for Curry, Coos, Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsop Counties, and the coastal towns of Douglas and Lane Counties. OCCA brings high quality arts experiences to the Coast. The Coastal Oregon Visual Artists Showcase features mid-career artists within the arts council.

The Newport Visual Arts Center is located at 777 NW Beach Drive on the beach in the historic Nye Beach area of Newport. For further information about the Newport Visual Arts Center and the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, go to the Links page and click on the link for the Center, or call OCCA VAC Director Sally Houck at (541) 265-6569.

Kiwanda Children’s Halloween Party

The Kiwanda Community Center will hold its annual Children’s Halloween Party Thursday, October 31, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at the Community Center. The party this year will be hosted by the Nestucca Valley High School Student Body.

There will be games, prizes, face painting and a cake walk.

The Nesko Women’s Club and the Nestucca Valley Lions Club will be kicking off their 2013 Christmas Basket program. So, please bring a non-perishable food donation for the food drive.

Bits and Pieces

I haven’t seen our wandering deer for several weeks, but my neighbor told me that she has seen mama and the twins several times this week. Maybe they’re avoiding me.

When returning home from Freddy’s several days ago I came upon a curious scene. As I approached the 5th Street entrance to the City, I saw a light pickup backed into the red rock beautification area, its rear wheels sunk hubcap deep into the ground. There were several people standing around scratching their heads, and a Tillamook police car parked across the street, in front of “Fresh.” How a guy could have gotten stuck like that eludes me. I guess it eluded a few others as well.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be November 21 at 6 p.m.

 

 

October 11, 2013

BAY CITY, October 11, 2013 --- There is certainly much to report this week. The waterline break continues to drive most of the news, in one way or another. But there were other issues as well, and the City Council meeting was quite long.

Judy Wadley Fund Raisers

There is one more fundraiser in the offing. The Bay City Boosters Club and the Fire Department will host a hamburger, hot dog and potato salad dinner at the Community Hall Saturday, October 26. In addition to the eats, there will be a silent auction to help the Wadley family. This event will run from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., and cost of admission is a donation.

I’m told that the meat items are being donated by the Smoker, and the potato salad by The Landing. If you would like to donate something for the silent auction, contact Linda Vining at (503) 377-2257, or Gretchen Power at (503) 377-2113.

Judy gave her all for the Bay City post office. Let’s all pitch in and help the Wadley family through the hardship they now face. You’ll be glad you did.

Goal Setting Workshop

There will be a Goal Setting workshop Tuesday, October 22, in the Council chambers. I had previously said it would be a Town Hall, but I was in error. They had talked about doing a Town Hall, but for the time, we’re sticking to the workshop format.

Emergency Preparedness

The Emergency Preparedness committee met Wednesday evening to review our emergency procedures and activation of emergency operations and incident command centers. Mayor Shaena Peterson and City Recorder Linda Downey attended to offer their perspectives.

The driving force underlying this meeting was the recent waterline break, and an after-action analysis of the things that went well, and those that did not. A major concern among those in attendance was timely notification.

A major water outage is like any other emergency situation, Fire Chief Darrell Griffith remarked. You set up your Incident Command Center and execute your plan. The night of the incident, Bob Miles noticed he was out of water about 9 p.m., and called me to see whether I had water. I did not. So I called John Gettman, who lives at a higher elevation than I do, and he said his water was out also. I concluded that the high level reservoirs were empty, and called David Pace, our Public Works Superintendent.

About the same time, Lin Downey learned of the outage and called David. That was about two minutes after I had called him, and David was then calling out his crew. Linda then called the Fire Department, because loss of water means loss of fire flow, should a fire occur during the outage.

Darrell Griffith and Tom Dotson called out the Fire Department, and organized those responding into two companies, one to remain on the scene to control traffic, and the other to relieve the first company if the outage continued past a certain hour.

David drove to both reservoirs to isolate them while Brian Bettis organized and directed the Public Works employees at the scene of the break. After the initial calls to alert Public Works to the outage, there was no convenient way to contact those in charge.

Because the incident happened at night, many in Bay City didn’t realize their water had gone out. Those who learned during the night that there was no water called the City Office the following morning to complain and ask why they weren’t notified. After the repair was completed and the reservoirs sufficiently filled to pressurize the system, most people didn’t know they had to boil their water.

Boil notices were gotten out by a variety of means, including notices posted around town. Gordon McCraw included the boil order in his daily weather report. The City posted the notice on its Facebook page, and others were notified through Twitter or Nixel. But notifications remained spotty.

Shaena suggested conducting quarterly drills to iron out the rough spots in our emergency response procedures. Darrell suggested that the first drill be a so-called “table top” before actually mobilizing the City’s resources.

Everyone agreed that notification was essential, and that there is no single notification procedure that will include everyone involved. Many people no longer have landline telephones; some have no computers or smart phones. Everyone also agreed that the City couldn’t expect the Fire Department to make the rounds passing messages, because they have a role to play in mitigating the emergency situation.

The key to notifying citizens lies in the Map Your Neighborhood plan, where block captains would notify their neighbors and determine whether they have the means to get through the emergency. Map Your Neighborhood is in its infancy but growing, thanks to the efforts of Liane Welch and Wendy Schink.

The committee also discussed the role of HAM radio in its communications plan. Darrell said a base station could be obtained and set up for about $200, which could support radio communications throughout the City during emergencies. There are a number of licensed HAM radio operators in Bay City.

Shaena also added that radio and TV stations should be notified so that they could broadcast essential information.

Darrell emphasized the importance of notifying neighboring fire and public works departments to assure backup assistance is available if needed.

City Council News

The City Council met in regular session Tuesday, October 8. As its first order of business, Mayor Shaena Peterson reopened the public hearing, continued from the September meeting, on establishment of a Transient Room Tax. There was no further public comment, and the Council adopted Ordinance 657 after making several minor amendments. The tax will be nine percent of a transient’s room rent and will take effect January 1, 2014.

Mayor Shaena Peterson moved several agenda items to the top of the schedule to accommodate affected persons.

Charles Sheehan and Connie “Mary” Susanka were in the process of improving their Main Street property, which has steep slopes and lies within a hazard overlay zone. They had installed a retaining wall and a wheelchair ramp with a turnaround. Because of the height of the retaining wall, there was a question whether the wheelchair ramp required a guardrail.

Since a portion of the ramp extends into a public right-of-way, City Attorney Lois Albright prepared an Agreement for Temporary Use of Right-of-Way. The county building official evaluated the situation and determined that the wheelchair ramp was a landscaping item and therefore no guardrail is required.

At issue before the Council was whether the City should require a guardrail in any event, since the ramp’s encroachment into the right-of-way could expose the City to risk if someone were to fall off. Sheehan and Susanka assured the Council that their evergreen plantings would soon grow to a height that would prevent a person from falling off the ramp and over the retaining wall, but said they would install a guardrail if determined necessary.

The City’s insurer had been advised of the matter, and asked the City to “send us everything you’ve got.” The Council deferred action on the guardrail pending advice from the insurance carrier.

Jerri McRae and Steve Boquist appeared before the Council to discuss a proposed agreement between the City and the Juno Nonprofit Water Improvement District. Under the contract, the City of Bay City would perform certain services for the Juno district, such as reading meters and issuing water bills, monthly coliform testing and responding to locate requests. McRae and Boquist took issue with amounts billed and the periods to which the billed amounts applied.

The City set a special meeting to consider the Juno concerns in greater detail on October 24.

Lenhard “Bud” Gienger is building a new house within the Bay Ridge Subdivision, a gated community, and is requesting access to the new house via High Street. Bay Ridge Subdivision was approved, with conditions, by the Planning Commission in 1994. Gated access would be via Ocean Street, and there would be an additional access point for fire and emergency vehicles.

Condition 10 of the 1994 Conditions of Approval states that, “… access to High Street and First Street outside the subdivision should be blockaded with a planted berm or barrier to prevent use of an unimproved street.” (Emphasis supplied.) City Planner Sabrina Pearson said in her report that the City has made two documented improvements to High Street, “and thus High Street in this geographic location appears to have been accepted by the City as consistent with City Standards.”

City Attorney Lois Albright, in her written report to the City, noting the use of the word, “should” rather than “shall,” concluded that the Giengers could access their property from High Street, since High Street is no longer an unimproved street.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith expressed his concern that, although High Street was “improved,” it was too narrow to accommodate fire equipment safely. Public Works Superintendent David Pace had previously concluded that High Street could not be widened further because of steep slopes.

There was further discussion of street standards and the suggestion was made that the matter be referred to the Planning Commission for recommendation as to roads policy.

Under Visitors’ Propositions, Gertrude Jolly asked that trees growing near her property be trimmed to prevent their hitting her home if blown down by a storm.

Scott Bailey appeared before the Council to discuss the OWEB grant request to repair or replace eight failing culverts along Patterson Creek. He complimented the City for its work in restoring the riparian areas along the stream and restoring fish passage.

The City had placed fourth for a grant to replace culverts, but, sadly, only three grants were made. Bailey noted that OWEB was concerned that the City didn’t have sufficient financial commitment to do the project, and that long-term commitment would amount to about $1 million.

The Council adopted a motion to prepare a letter to OWEB assuring its financial commitment to repair of the culverts.

The Fire Chief noted that the Fire Department had responded to the waterline break, and reported a communication failure, that Tillamook could not be paged out. The only communications available, Darrell said, was Ma Bell.

Shaena said she would like to see the City engage in periodic drills to refine and improve the City’s ability to respond to emergencies.

There was extended discussion of improvements needing to be made to the water system. There is no way of shutting off flow from the 100,000 gallon Baseline reservoir, most of the pipes in the ground were installed in 1981, and there is no telemetry to alert Public Works to excessive flow of water.

Councilor John Gettman noted that System Development Charge funds are not being used to improve the water system. He noted that there is about $846,000 in the treasury that is not committed to budgetary needs. He urged use of some of these funds to take care of some immediate needs to improve the water system. The system needs a third well, an additional low level reservoir, telemetry, better valving, and replacement of old pipe.

Shaena noted that the City needs to set a policy on the use of its Facebook page, and that it be restricted to City business only. She also suggested that important notices could be printed on the backs of the water bills which, she said, were really blank postcards.

Vacancies in City Government

We now have two vacancies on the Planning Commission, and another is expected in the not-too-distant future. One of our members wishes to resign as soon as a replacement can be found. To apply to fill these vacancies, you need only fill out an application at the city office. Applicants may expect to be interviewed. We expect more land use issues to arise as the economy improves, and we’ll need a full Commission. Presently, we’re finishing up on making text amendments to the Development Ordinance.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters met Sept. 27 to kick off their fall and winter season. Some discussion centered upon the recent waterline break. But the real business of the day was the Wadley fundraiser set for October 26. The Boosters Club welcomes all who live in or near Bay City. The club meets the last Friday of the month, with special provisions for the months of November and December. The members bring their potluck food items at 11:30, and the formal meeting starts at noon. The meeting generally lasts until 1 p.m. or so. Come on down, we’d love to see you.

VFW Women’s Rummage Sale

It’s time to start cleaning out your closets and cupboards. The VFW Ladies’ Auxiliary is preparing for their annual fall Rummage Sale. You can bring your donations to City Hall Wednesday, October 16, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and again Wednesday evening from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Donations will also be accepted Thursday, October 17, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For those bringing clothing, please be sure to bring only clean, usable items of clothing.

The sale, itself, will be held Friday, October 19, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday, October 20, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

There will also be a bake sale. Proceeds from the sale are used for projects to help veterans and their families.

 

Burning Restrictions

With all the rain we’ve had recently, I’m happy to say that our burning restrictions are over for the year, except if we were to suddenly experience a severe drought and hot weather. Somehow I don’t think that will happen.

Remember to have a charged hose nearby if you are open burning.

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace

ArtSpace has been renamed, “Fresh.” It’s official.

They serve smoothies and other goodies, according to the signs on one of the front windows. I’ve been meaning to get down there after a long hiatus to check it out, but there always seems to be a hotter brush fire that needs to be addressed. I did make it down there for the recent Wadley fundraiser. I noticed an attractive menu posted by the kitchen, so I believe the place is returning to its former self. Sharline and I will have to try a lunch down there soon.

Bay City Arts Center

The Artist of the Month for October is artist and instructor Sheri E. Smith, who will be showing her basket weaving throughout the month. Sheri put on a fabulous workshop last weekend on weaving with pine needles. You can see her work at the Pancake Breakfast or during open studio hours.

October 12, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., will be cleanup day at the Arts Center. They need volunteers to come down and help spruce up the Center.

BCAC will hold a rummage sale October 19. If you have items to donate, you may drop them by the Arts Center Oct. 18, between 9 a.m. and noon.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, Oct. 20. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

There will be a stone carving workshop Oct. 26 and 27, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuition is by donation.

Open Studio: BCAC is open for artistic exploration Wednesday evenings from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your own materials and make some art!

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. All levels are welcome.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend, but donations are welcome to help cover the cost of utilities.

The Board of Directors meets the first Monday of each month. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you want to get on the agenda, contact Dia Norris at gnorris@oregoncoast.com.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

The Arts Center has run into difficulties with its Web site. But you can still access the Arts Center’s Facebook page. The Arts Center is continuing to work on its Web site, but if you have questions, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Newport Visual Arts Center

The Coast, a New Vision, Mixed Media Oil Paintings and Sand Dollar Mosaics

Mimi Cernyar Fox is exhibiting her new work, “The Coast, a New Vision,” from October 4 through December 1 in the Runyan Gallery. A reception for her was held October 4, and a second reception will be held Friday, November 1, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Mimi grew up in Mt. Angel, Oregon, and studied art at the Mt. Angel Acadamy. While living on the coast, she took painting classes from William Runyan, who encouraged her to obtain a formal degree. She received her BFA at Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland. She has taught community college classes at the VAC from 2004 through 2008. In 2004 she had an exhibition at the VAC called “Ocean Cowboys: The Fishermen and the Fleet.”

Her work was also featured in a 2008 exhibition at the Gallerie Etienne de Causans in Paris, France, and, more recently, at the Brian Marki Gallery, Blackfish Gallery, and Beppu/Wyardia Gallery in Portland. Her work is currently displayed at the Sun Rose Gallery in Seaside, Oregon.

Mimi has almost always lived by the sea, and she is married to a fisherman. Her current work relies on images of the sea, or from the sea. Her new sand dollar paintings/mosaics are “absolutely inspiring.” Her highly textured paintings glitter with sand, encouraging one to think about our delicate sea life.

The Runyan Gallery is on the first floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. through October, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. November through April.

River Mantra

Tillamook County artist Christine Harrison will exhibit “River Mantra,” pastel drawings, and acrylic and oil paintings in the Coastal Oregon Visual Artists’ Showcase on the second floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center through October 26. There will be an opening reception for Christine Friday, September 6, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Christine is a painter and sculptor. Her most recent sculpture project, three large cement cows, was a joint venture with Heidi Clemens and the 2010 Ford Family Foundation Tillamook Leadership Candidates. The cows are prominently displayed at three locations in Tillamook County.

Christine has a Masters in Fine Arts earned at the College of Fine Arts in Oakland, California. She has created an intergenerational art program for underserved populations of senior citizens and inner city public school children. Her work is imbued with a power of nature theme. Her works have been shown in one-person exhibits in many locations in the Unites States.

She will be the featured speaker at the September Exhibition Coffee for Docents and Volunteers, and anyone interested in volunteering at the Visual Arts Center at 11 a.m. October 10 in Room 302, Visual Arts Center.

The Visual Arts Showcase, an outreach program featuring mid-career visual artists, is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.

Oregon Council for the Arts is a nonprofit arts organization and the regional arts council for Curry, Coos, Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsop Counties, and the coastal towns of Douglas and Lane Counties. OCCA brings high quality arts experiences to the Coast. The Coastal Oregon Visual Artists Showcase features mid-career artists within the arts council.

The Newport Visual Arts Center is located at 777 NW Beach Drive on the beach in the historic Nye Beach area of Newport. For further information about the Newport Visual Arts Center and the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, go to the Links page and click on the link for the Center, or call OCCA VAC Director Sally Houck at (541) 265-6569.

Kiwanda Children’s Halloween Party

The Kiwanda Community Center will hold its annual Children’s Halloween Party Thursday, October 31, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at the Community Center. The party this year will be hosted by the Nestucca Valley High School Student Body.

There will be games, prizes, face painting and a cake walk.

The Nesko Women’s Club and the Nestucca Valley Lions Club will be kicking off their 2013 Christmas Basket program. So, please bring a non-perishable food donation for the food drive.

Bits and Pieces

I haven’t seen many deer this past week, but we sure have a great collection of October Halloween spiders. I walked out of my house the other morning only to step right into a web spun by a huge spider the night before. Well, at least they don’t eat much.

And, I have not yet encountered Bob Miles’ wandering, pear-eating bear. And, truth be known, I hope I never do. Tangling with the neighborhood bear is not high on my list of fun things to do.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be October 17 at 6 p.m.

 

October 6, 2013

BAY CITY, October 6, 2013 --- The big item since the last Back Fence was the water outage. The water went out about 9 p.m. September 25, and was restored early the following morning. Read all about it below the Wadley Fund Raisers.

Judy Wadley Fund Raisers

Sharline and I attended the Pasta Feed at Fresh, formerly ArtSpace, on Friday, October 4. It was very well attended, which was gratifying. Those attending were a veritable Who’s Who of Bay City and surrounding communities. Sharline and I sat at a table with two nice ladies from Rockaway Beach.

The pastas offered by Trisha Kauffman and Fresh were excellent. The only feature I didn’t like was the Sun. It was late afternoon, and the Sun was reflecting off the bay and right into my eyes. As an afterthought, maybe Trisha should have scheduled the event for low tide. The Sun doesn’t reflect well off of mud.

There is one more fundraiser in the offing. The Bay City Boosters Club and the Fire Department will host a hamburger, hot dog and potato salad dinner at the Community Hall Saturday, October 26. In addition to the eats, there will be a silent auction to help the Wadley family. This event will run from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., and cost of admission is a donation.

I’m told that the meat items are being donated by the Smoker, and the potato salad by The Landing. If you would like to donate something for the silent auction, contact Linda Vining at (503) 377-2257, or Gretchen Power at (503) 377-2113.

Judy gave her all for the Bay City post office. Let’s all pitch in and help the Wadley family through the hardship they now face. You’ll be glad you did.

It’s all about Water

Most of you are now aware that residences on the High Level Distribution System were without water Wednesday evening, September 25. Most of you, but not all.

I got a call from Bob Miles, whose property is at the lowest elevation served by the high level system. His water had gone south, he said, and he asked how mine was. It had gone south, too. I called John Gettman, who lives at a higher elevation, who said his water was gone as well.

With that information, I called Dave Pace, our Public Works superintendent. It was about 9 p.m., and Dave had just returned home from a Planning Commission meeting. I explained that I feared that both high level reservoirs had gone dry. Two minutes later Dave was called by the 9-1-1 people telling him that calls had been received about the water outage. Dave instructed them to tell callers that a crew had been dispatched.

It didn’t take long to find the problem. As Craig Kauffman, who owns Fresh, told me, he saw water rising from the side of 5th Street and knew something was amiss. Dave and his crew arrived soon thereafter.

I saw the pipe the following morning. A 20-foot section of eight-inch had a longitudinal split, which would cause a very rapid loss of large volumes of water.

When I spoke with Dave later, he commented that the pipe appeared to have been stressed laterally by land movement. The pipe had been in the ground since 1981, when the system was first built. Lateral movement is not uncommon in this area. Much of Bay City is in a landslide hazard overlay zone. The ground is moving, albeit very slowly. But over time, such movement will take its toll on buried utilities and streets.

There is a place on Latimer road, near the bridge over the Wilson River, where lateral displacement of the road is clearly visible. There is a water pipe there also, which could be affected by the lateral movement.

For the information of anyone who doesn’t know, Bay City has two water distribution systems. The high level system serves residences at the higher elevations of the City. Residences at the lower elevations are served by the low level system, which delivers water at a significantly lower pressure. Only the high level system was affected by the recent break.

But I digress. A major concern discussed at a meeting of the Public Works Committee a week later was inconsistency of notification. Some people discovered their water was gone, and called the city office the next day to complain. Most were very accommodating, but there were some who were pretty rough on our office staff.

A Your Town email was sent out to those few who are on the mailing list, and I sent a notification to all the adressees on my Grapevine mailing list. But there are some who don’t have computers or access to the Internet. A reverse 9-1-1 call would catch most residents, but there is a growing number of people who don’t have land line phones. I suggested that the Fire Department could help by driving the streets and announcing the problem. It’s been done before. A neighbor just down the street from me never knew we had had a waterline break. Likewise a lady living on the north side of town.

The main consideration after such a waterline break is safety of the water. When a waterline breaks, dirt and nasty bugs get into the system. It is important that you not drink the water without first boiling it. Even though notices had been posted around town the morning following the break, there were many who didn’t see them, and many who didn’t even realize that their water had been out of service.

The procedure following a waterline break is to fill the reservoirs and pressurize the system. Then the system must be sanitized, that is, to hyperchlorinate it and then drain it. Then the reservoirs are refilled and water samples taken from different locations on the system. These go to the laboratory, where they are cultured. The culture takes 24 hours to grow, if there are germs present. Only after the lab results are negative for pathogens is the water safe to drink.

Here is a rule of thumb to follow. If you turn on your faucet and hear a lot of air coming out with the water, you can pretty well be sure there has been a break in the waterline. You’ll also hear a lot of noise when you flush a toilet. Don’t drink the water, or use it to wash dishes until you determine that it is safe. Also, don’t use it for hand washing, brushing teeth or cleaning dentures. Check the bulletin boards around town, or call the City office. Don’t drink the water until you learn positively that it’s safe.

The Public Works Committee also discussed the need to drill a third well and replace aging infrastructure, but those are subjects for another day.

Vacancies in City Government

We now have two vacancies on the Planning Commission, and another is expected in the not-too-distant future. One of our members wishes to resign as soon as a replacement can be found. To apply to fill these vacancies, you need only fill out an application at the city office. Applicants may expect to be interviewed. We expect more land use issues to arise as the economy improves, and we’ll need a full Commission. Presently, we’re finishing up on making text amendments to the Development Ordinance.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters met Sept. 27 to kick off their fall and winter season. Some discussion centered upon the recent waterline break. But the real business of the day was the Wadley fundraiser set for October 26. The Boosters Club welcomes all who live in or near Bay City. The club meets the last Friday of the month, with special provisions for the months of November and December. The members bring their potluck food items at 11:30, and the formal meeting starts at noon. The meeting generally lasts until 1 p.m. or so. Come on down, we’d love to see you.

VFW Women’s Rummage Sale

It’s time to start cleaning out your closets and cupboards. The VFW Ladies’ Auxiliary is preparing for their annual fall Rummage Sale. You can bring your donations to City Hall Wednesday, October 16, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and again Wednesday evening from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Donations will also be accepted Thursday, October 17, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For those bringing clothing, please be sure to bring only clean, usable items of clothing.

The sale, itself, will be held Friday, October 19, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday, October 20, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

There will also be a bake sale. Proceeds from the sale are used for projects to help veterans and their families.

Burning Restrictions

With all the rain we’ve had recently, I’m happy to say that our burning restrictions are over for the year, except if we were to suddenly experience a severe drought and hot weather. Somehow I don’t think that will happen.

Remember to have a charged hose nearby if you are open burning.

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

 

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

ArtSpace

ArtSpace has been renamed, “Fresh.” I had presumed that the place was now called the Museum of People’s Art, but I guess I was wrong.

They serve smoothies and other goodies, according to the signs on one of the front windows. I’ve been meaning to get down there after a long hiatus to check it out, but there always seems to be a hotter brush fire that needs to be addressed. I did make it down there for the recent Wadley fundraiser. I noticed an attractive menu posted by the kitchen, so I believe the place is returning to its former self. Sharline and I will have to try a lunch down there soon.

Bay City Arts Center

The Arts Center hosted a reception September 28, for the Art Show, “Economic Development in Everyday Life.” The show features more than 50 four-inch by four-inch photos from people all across the nation. All photos are priced at $20, and will be taken off the wall upon sale. So, the smart advice is to get there early.

The photos illustrate the small and joyful ways that people engage in economic development on a daily basis. Participants range from a Brooklyn architect to the owner of a Portland business. The show is curated by BCAC Board Member Terra Wilcoxson.

Breanna Moran continues her series on Intermediate Adult Painting. These sessions take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday evenings. Cost of four sessions is $65 for the public and $55 for BCAC members. Or, you can drop in for $18, or $15 if you are a BCAC member. You must bring your own materials. Check the BCAC Facebook page for the complete schedule.

October 12, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., will be cleanup day at the Arts Center. They need volunteers to come down and help spruce up the Center.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, Oct. 20. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

Open Studio: BCAC is open for artistic exploration Wednesday evenings from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your own materials and make some art!

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. All levels are welcome.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend, but donations are welcome to help cover the cost of utilities.

The Board of Directors meets the first Monday of each month. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you want to get on the agenda, contact Dia Norris at gnorris@oregoncoast.com.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

The Arts Center has run into difficulties with its Web site. But you can still access the Arts Center’s Facebook page. The Arts Center is continuing to work on its Web site, but if you have questions, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Newport Visual Arts Center

The Coast, a New Vision, Mixed Media Oil Paintings and Sand Dollar Mosaics

Mimi Cernyar Fox is exhibiting her new work, “The Coast, a New Vision,” from October 4 through December 1 in the Runyan Gallery. A reception for her was held October 4, and a second reception will be held Friday, November 1, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Mimi grew up in Mt. Angel, Oregon, and studied art at the Mt. Angel Acadamy. While living on the coast, she took painting classes from William Runyan, who encouraged her to obtain a formal degree. She received her BFA at Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland. She has taught community college classes at the VAC from 2004 through 2008. In 2004 she had an exhibition at the VAC called “Ocean Cowboys: The Fishermen and the Fleet.”

Her work was also featured in a 2008 exhibition at the Gallerie Etienne de Causans in Paris, France, and, more recently, at the Brian Marki Gallery, Blackfish Gallery, and Beppu/Wyardia Gallery in Portland. Her work is currently displayed at the Sun Rose Gallery in Seaside, Oregon.

Mimi has almost always lived by the sea, and she is married to a fisherman. Her current work relies on images of the sea, or from the sea. Her new sand dollar paintings/mosaics are “absolutely inspiring.” Her highly textured paintings glitter with sand, encouraging one to think about our delicate sea life.

The Runyan Gallery is on the first floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. through October, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. November through April.

River Mantra

Tillamook County artist Christine Harrison will exhibit “River Mantra,” pastel drawings, and acrylic and oil paintings in the Coastal Oregon Visual Artists’ Showcase on the second floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center through October 26. There will be an opening reception for Christine Friday, September 6, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Christine is a painter and sculptor. Her most recent sculpture project, three large cement cows, was a joint venture with Heidi Clemens and the 2010 Ford Family Foundation Tillamook Leadership Candidates. The cows are prominently displayed at three locations in Tillamook County.

Christine has a Masters in Fine Arts earned at the College of Fine Arts in Oakland, California. She has created an intergenerational art program for underserved populations of senior citizens and inner city public school children. Her work is imbued with a power of nature theme. Her works have been shown in one-person exhibits in many locations in the Unites States.

She will be the featured speaker at the September Exhibition Coffee for Docents and Volunteers, and anyone interested in volunteering at the Visual Arts Center at 11 a.m. October 10 in Room 302, Visual Arts Center.

The Visual Arts Showcase, an outreach program featuring mid-career visual artists, is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.

Oregon Council for the Arts is a nonprofit arts organization and the regional arts council for Curry, Coos, Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsop Counties, and the coastal towns of Douglas and Lane Counties. OCCA brings high quality arts experiences to the Coast. The Coastal Oregon Visual Artists Showcase features mid-career artists within the arts council.

The Newport Visual Arts Center is located at 777 NW Beach Drive on the beach in the historic Nye Beach area of Newport. For further information about the Newport Visual Arts Center and the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, go to the Links page and click on the link for the Center, or call OCCA VAC Director Sally Houck at (541) 265-6569.

Bits and Pieces

Our deer seem to enjoy visiting our property, and spend many mornings munching on my grass, now badly in need of mowing.

But my friend, Bob Miles, tops anything I have seen in my yard. He told me that a bear had eaten all the apples and pears remaining on his trees, and left a big bear calling card on his driveway lawn. Bob went on to comment that if he had eaten all those apples and pears, he’d not have been able to make it to the bathroom, either.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be October 17 at 6 p.m.

 

 

September 26, 2013

BAY CITY, September 26, 2013 --- Summer has ended, and the fall season hit us like a sledge hammer. After the beautiful days we had last week, Sunday, the first day of fall, brought us rain and wind. Monday at noon my rain gauge showed two and one-half inches. That’s a lot of rain. The following day we had three-quarters of an inch, and Wednesday I dumped out a whole inch of rain. Make no mistake. Fall is here!

Judy Wadley Fund Raisers

Two fundraisers for the Wadley family are in the works.

There will be a Pasta Feed at Fresh, formerly ArtSpace, on Friday, October 4, from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. There will be several pastas to select from, including a gluten-free option. There will also be salad and bread. Children eat for $5, seniors for $6, and adults for $8.

The Bay City Boosters Club and the Fire Department will host a hamburger, hot dog and potato salad dinner at the Community Hall Saturday, October 26. In addition to the eats, there will be a silent auction to help the Wadley family. I’ll have more details on this in a future Back Fence.

Judy gave her all for the Bay City post office. Let’s all pitch in and help the Wadley family through the hardship they now face. You’ll be glad you did.

Judy’s Memorial

On Sept. 21 I attended a beautiful memorial service for Judy Wadley, our departed postmaster. It was held in the large meeting hall attached to the Tillamook Church of the Nazarene. Unlike most funerals or memorial services I have attended, at Judy’s service we all sat at tables, about six people to a table. It was my pleasure to sit with Bay City Councilor Robert Pollock, and Linda Downey and Angie Cherry from the Bay City office.

The service lasted about an hour before a very large group of Judy’s friends. My neighbor, Bob Miles, was one of the “ushers,” who provided the microphones for Judy’s friends to give their remembrances of Judy during her lifetime. The program opened with a reading of Judy’s “obituary” followed by a performance by the Reflections of His Glory dance team, which also closed the program. To me, it was reminiscent of a Missing Man flyover, an old military tradition, since Judy had been a member of the dance team. There was, indeed, a missing person, but I’m sure she was looking down upon us and laughing all the while.

Other Bay City News

I talked to Karen Rust at our VFW meeting. She still can’t bear weight on that foot and ankle yet, but she gets around. She has a scooter-like contraption on which she kneels with her injured leg, and she uses the good leg for propulsion. It’s a nice looking rig. She said she’s feeling better, and looking forward to bearing weight in about two weeks.

Vacancies in City Government

We now have two vacancies on the Planning Commission, and another is expected in the not-too-distant future. One of our members wishes to resign as soon as a replacement can be found. To apply to fill these vacancies, you need only fill out an application at the city office. Applicants may expect to be interviewed. We expect more land use issues to arise as the economy improves, and we’ll need a full Commission. Presently, we’re finishing up on making text amendments to the Development Ordinance.

Help the Library Plan for the Future

The Tillamook County Library is working on a needs assessment to plan the Library of the Future, for the next 10 to 20 years. Open houses will be held at all branches between Sept. 27 and Oct. 2. Those attending the open houses will have an opportunity to give their input.

There will be demonstrations of eBook readers and Library databases, and refreshments will be provided. County Librarian Sara Charlton invites everyone to attend an open house and see what the future holds, and explore the Library’s electronic services.

Open House Schedule:

Manzanita: Friday, September 27, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Garibaldi: Monday, September 30, noon to 1:30 p.m.
Bay City: Tuesday, October 1, noon to 1:30 p.m.

Pacific City: Tuesday, October 1, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Rockaway: Wednesday, October 2, noon to 1:30 p.m.
Main Library: Wednesday, October 2, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Bay City Boosters

It’s that time again. The Boosters are back in session. The Boosters will hold their inaugural fall meeting Friday, September 27. Bring a potluck item and something for the auction at 11:30 a.m. The meeting starts at noon. The Boosters will discuss the planned October 26 fundraiser for the Wadley family, among other things. New members are welcome.

VFW Women’s Rummage Sale

It’s time to start cleaning out your closets and cupboards. The VFW Ladies’ Auxiliary is preparing for their annual fall Rummage Sale. You can bring your donations to City Hall Wednesday, October 16, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and again Wednesday evening from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Donations will also be accepted Thursday, October 17, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For those bringing clothing, please be sure to bring only clean, usable items of clothing.

The sale, itself, will be held Friday, October 19, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday, October 20, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

There will also be a bake sale. Proceeds from the sale are used for projects to help veterans and their families.

Goal Setting Workshop

I attended a meeting of the Goal Setting Workshop on Tuesday, Sept. 24. Mayor Shaena Peterson was seeking ideas on the best format for setting the City’s goals. She noted that there had been many goal-setting ventures in the past, including the Vision Committee, but said the results now gather dust on a shelf.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith pointed out that, presently, the City is driven by its budget and grants. It should be driven by goals, Darrel said, and those goals should determine the budget and what grants are sought.

A number of other helpful suggestions were offered, including brainstorming sessions and a town hall meeting.

Shaena said she would like to have Planning Commission members participating in the Goal Setting sessions, since they are, technically, the City’s planners.

The group agreed to meet on the fourth Tuesday of the month at 6 p.m. The next meeting, on October 22, will be a Town Hall meeting, widely publicized. There will be no meetings in November and December because of the holidays, but they will resume in January with the new year.

Though time will then be short, it is hoped that the group will produce some goals that can be considered when developing the annual budget.

Burning Restrictions

I was gratified to see that green sign once again displayed on the front of the fire station. Outside burning is again permitted. The rains have dampened the area sufficiently to allow open burning as well as burning in barrels, provided you have a proper burn permit.

Remember to have a charged hose nearby if you are open burning.

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

ArtSpace

ArtSpace has been renamed, “Fresh.” I had presumed that the place was now called the Museum of People’s Art, but I guess I was wrong.

They serve smoothies and other goodies, according to the signs on one of the front windows. I’ve been meaning to get down there after a long hiatus to check it out, but there always seems to be a hotter brush fire that needs to be addressed.

Bay City Arts Center

The BCAC is hosting a reception Saturday, September 28, from 6 to 8 p.m. for the September Art Show, “Economic Development in Everyday Life.” The show features more than 50 four-inch by four-inch photos from people all across the nation. All photos are priced at $20, and will be taken off the wall upon sale. So, the smart advice is to get there at 6 p.m.

The photos illustrate the small and joyful ways that people engage in economic development on a daily basis. Participants range from a Brooklyn architect to the owner of a Portland business. The show was curated by BCAC Board Member Terra Wilcoxson. Light refreshments will be served.

 

On Saturday, October 5, Sheri E. Smith will teach a pine needle basket weaving class. The class will run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and will cost $80, which will include materials. Those attending are encouraged to bring a sack lunch.

Sheri will also teach an ornament creation class on Sunday, October 6, from 9 a.m. to noon. Cost of the ornament creation class will be $35, which includes materials.

Breanna Moran continues her series on Intermediate Adult Painting. These sessions take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday evenings. Cost of four sessions is $65 for the public and $55 for BCAC members. Or, you can drop in for $18, or $15 if you are a BCAC member. You must bring your own materials. Check the BCAC Facebook page for the complete schedule.

October 12, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., will be cleanup day at the Arts Center. They need volunteers to come down and help spruce up the Center.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, Oct. 20. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

Open Studio: BCAC is open for artistic exploration Wednesday evenings from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your own materials and make some art!

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. All levels are welcome.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend, but donations are welcome to help cover the cost of utilities.

The Board of Directors meets the first Monday of each month. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you want to get on the agenda, contact Dia Norris at gnorris@oregoncoast.com.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

The Arts Center has run into difficulties with its Web site. But you can still access the Arts Center’s Facebook page. The Arts Center is continuing to work on its Web site, but if you have questions, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Newport Visual Arts Center

From Pattern to Painting: The Art of the Marbled Surface

One-of-a-kind paintings on hand-marbled surfaces by Jean Blatner, Susan Cowan, Sandy Dutko, Airi Foote, Carol Sands and Liz Walker are on display in the Runyan Gallery at the Newport Visual Arts Center from through September 29, 2013. The exhibit is free and open to the public. A reception will be held September 6, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Liz Walker will give an artist’s talk at 5:30 p.m. in the Runyan Gallery. Refreshments will be served. The exhibit is sponsored by the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts (OCCA),

These Portland area artists, who first learned to marble from fellow artist and instructor Susan Cowan, have been experimenting with paints and paper for more than five years, creating their own modern version of an artistic practice called ebru marbling that dates back to the Ottoman Empire.

Paper marbling is a method of aqueous surface design which can produce patterns similar to smooth marble or other stone. The patterns are the result of color floated on a viscous solution known as “size,” and combined with a stylus or rake before being carefully transferred to an absorbent surface such as paper or canvas. Part of its appeal is that each print is a unique monotype. Not content to marble solely on paper and canvas surfaces, these painters have also marbled baskets, wooden boxes, dried gourds and other objects, some of which are included in this exhibit.

Liz Walker will teach a water media workshop, “From Marbled Paper to Finished Painting,” on Saturday, September 7, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Walker will teach students how to glaze and layer over pre-marbled papers. Marbled papers will be provided.

The Runyan Gallery is on the first floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

River Mantra

Tillamook County artist Christine Harrison will exhibit “River Mantra,” pastel drawings, and acrylic and oil paintings in the Coastal Oregon Visual Artists’ Showcase on the second floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center through October 26. There will be an opening reception for Christine Friday, September 6, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Christine is a painter and sculptor. Her most recent sculpture project, three large cement cows, was a joint venture with Heidi Clemens and the 2010 Ford Family Foundation Tillamook Leadership Candidates. The cows are prominently displayed at three locations in Tillamook County.

Christine has a Masters in Fine Arts earned at the College of Fine Arts in Oakland, California. She has created an intergenerational art program for underserved populations of senior citizens and inner city public school children. Her work is imbued with a power of nature theme. Her works have been shown in one-person exhibits in many locations in the Unites States.

She will be the featured speaker at the September Exhibition Coffee for Docents and Volunteers, and anyone interested in volunteering at the Visual Arts Center at 11 a.m. October 10 in Room 302, Visual Arts Center.

The Visual Arts Showcase, an outreach program featuring mid-career visual artists, is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.

Bearing Witness

Amber Sprague shows her work, “Bearing Witness,” in the Upstairs Gallery of the Visual Arts Center from Sept. 6 through Sept. 28. The Oregon Coast Council for the Arts will host an opening reception for her Sept. 6 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Amber holds a Masters in Teaching from Lewis and Clark College with an endorsement in art education. She will be teaching art the Newport Intermediate School and Isaac Newton Magnet School this year.

Amber’s personal artwork aims to raise the level of awareness of global social issues, particularly the education of all girls and universal access to clean water. Though not able to eradicate widespread poverty with a single solution, she said, she can bear witness to the real stories and hope found in the midst of those seemingly unsolvable problems. She strives to build an earthy, raw tactile experience that places the viewer in the life of the subject.

She will donate 30 percent of any sales of her work during the exhibit to Bridging the Gap, a non-profit organization working to raise awareness and funds to dig clean water wells in developing countries.

The Upstairs Gallery is located on the third floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center.

Oregon Council for the Arts is a nonprofit arts organization and the regional arts council for Curry, Coos, Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsop Counties, and the coastal towns of Douglas and Lane Counties. OCCA brings high quality arts experiences to the Coast. The Coastal Oregon Visual Artists Showcase features mid-career artists within the arts council.

The Newport Visual Arts Center is located at 777 NW Beach Drive on the beach in the historic Nye Beach area of Newport. For further information about the Newport Visual Arts Center and the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, go to the Links page and click on the link for the Center, or call OCCA VAC Director Sally Houck at (541) 265-6569.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad

The Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad continues to offer new opportunities to enjoy our beautiful part of the Northwest.

The OCSR recently leased much of the Port of Tillamook Bay trackage which remains intact, and the railroad has been working diligently ensure the safety of the roadbed and clear it of the vegetation that has encroached since the storms of 2007.

On October 5, OCSR plans an all-day excursion from Garibaldi to Batterson and back. The trip will take seven and one-half hours and include stops at Rockaway Beach and Wheeler. The trip to Batterson will take you along the Nehalem River in early fall, when fall colors should be at their height. There will be at least three photo run-bys.

The train will be pulled by the McCloud River #25, a Prairie type, wheel arrangement 2-6-2, a historic steam locomotive that was used in the trestle scene of the movie, “Stand by Me.” The consist will include two coaches, one open car and a baggage car.

Reservations will be required, and the cost of the excursion will be $98 per person. There are only 120 seats available, so reservations should be made sooner rather than later. For further information, please call (503) 292-5055.

Bits and Pieces

The other day as I was preparing to make yet another trip to the doctor’s office to have some blood drawn, I saw that we had company. Lots of company. There was mama deer with her not-so-little twins, and there was another mama with a lone fawn.

Those little guys have certainly grown during the summer, and their spots are barely discernable. I tried to back out very slowly so as not to spook the little guys, but they apparently thought they would be safer farther up on my hill, away from my driveway.

Sharline and I had a very nice 61st anniversary. We spent it visiting with our three daughters, plus one granddaughter, her husband, and their beautiful baby boy. He was so proud of himself when he figured out how to use a chair to hoist himself to his feet. It’s a lot of fun to watch a baby discover things for the first time.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be October 17 at 6 p.m.

 

 

September 19, 2013

BAY CITY, September 19, 2013 --- It looks like our summer is fading away. Fall begins on Sunday. It doesn’t seem possible. The seasons seem to go by faster with each passing year. For Sharline and me, the bulk of the summer has been spent driving over the mountain to see doctors. A little of that goes a very long way. Let’s hope we can enjoy the summer of 2014.

Judy Wadley Fund Raisers

Two fundraisers for the Wadley family are in the works.

There will be a Pasta Feed at Fresh, formerly ArtSpace, on Friday, October 4, from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. There will be several pastas to select from, including a gluten-free option. There will also be salad and bread. Children eat for $5, seniors for $6, and adults for $8.

The Bay City Beautification Committee, the Boosters Club and the Fire Department will host a hamburger, hot dog and potato salad dinner at the Community Hall Saturday, October 26. In addition to the eats, there will be a silent auction to help the Wadley family. I’ll have more details on this in a future Back Fence.

Judy gave her all for the Bay City post office. Let’s all pitch in and help the Wadley family through the hardship they now face. You’ll be glad you did.

Bay City Post Office

I’ve heard many comments about Judy, and how she’s missed. One of them came from Judy Riley, or G.I. Judy, Garibaldi’s postmaster.

“What a huge loss to our community,” she said. “I still hear her infectious laugh and see her smile.” G.I. Judy has received almost daily phone calls from people who have heard that Judy had passed. The callers were afraid the deceased was their own G.I. Judy.

 

G.I. Judy added that people in Bay City are more than welcome at the Garibaldi post office. They wouldn’t have to go all the way to Tillamook to buy stamps or certify mail while the Bay City post office is closed. Garibaldi is a mile closer to Bay City. As an added bonus, G.I. Judy offers coffee every day, and cookies on Mondays and Fridays. 

 

On Sept. 17, when I opened my P.O. box to retrieve my mail, I saw someone inside the post office. Curious, I asked who was lurking within the inner sanctum. A gentleman came over and introduced himself as Wayne Peterson, the Tillamook Postmaster.

We chatted about Judy and postal affairs in general. Wayne said that, ordinarily, the contract post office would be closed and local patrons would have to get their mail in Tillamook. However, he added, there were many elderly and infirm PO box holders in Bay City who would find it difficult to get their mail in Tillamook. Therefore, he said, he elected to continue to service Bay City’s PO boxes.

As to the future, Wayne said, he is seeking a new contract operator. It will probably take several months, but, in the meantime, he would continue to service Bay City’s PO boxes. He apologized for the inconvenience of our having to pick up our parcels in Tillamook. But it’s better than losing our post office altogether. Wayne explained again that the contract was in Judy’s name and under her Social Security number, so there was no legal way he could continue full service using Judy’s family members, as had been done during Judy’s illness.

I appreciate Wayne’s decision to continue servicing our PO boxes, and his willingness to discuss the matter with me. Let’s hope a qualified contract operator materializes soon.

Just remember that outgoing mail must be deposited in the outside mailbox at the post office. Mail deposited in the mail slots inside the post office will not be collected.

We’ll continue to miss and mourn Judy.

Judy’s Memorial

There will be a memorial service at the Tillamook Church of the Nazarene Saturday, Sept. 21, at 10:30 a.m. Refreshments will be served following Judy’s service.

If you should hear an infectious laugh during the service, that would be Judy looking down upon us from her perch on high.

Other Bay City News

On my way to get my mail the other day, I ran into Karen Rust, and we chatted for a bit. I noticed the massive boot she was wearing on her left foot and leg. It was just like the one they tried to put on Sharline after she had her fall in June. Sharline couldn’t wear the thing.

But Karen wasn’t complaining. She said she had lots of screws and other orthopedic devices in her ankle, and that she is still has three more weeks to wait before she can start bearing weight on that foot. She seemed in good spirits, but lamented that she wasn’t able go on the trip she had planned. So I think I’ll have to perform double duty, writing the Fencepost in addition to the Back Fence, for several more weeks. Who said life was fair?

Vacancies in City Government

We now have two vacancies on the Planning Commission, and another is expected in the not-too-distant future. One of our members wishes to resign as soon as a replacement can be found. To apply to fill these vacancies, you need only fill out an application at the city office. Applicants may expect to be interviewed. We expect more land use issues to arise as the economy improves, and we’ll need a full Commission. Presently, we’re finishing up on making text amendments to the Developent Ordinance.

Help the Library Plan for the Future

The Tillamook County Library is working on a needs assessment to plan the Library of the Future, for the next 10 to 20 years. Open houses will be held at all branches between Sept. 27 and Oct. 2. Those attending the open houses will have an opportunity to give their input.

There will be demonstrations of eBook readers and Library databases, and refreshments will be provided. County Librarian Sara Charlton invites everyone to attend an open house and see what the future holds, and explore the Library’s electronic services.

Open House Schedule:

Manzanita: Friday, September 27, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Garibaldi: Monday, September 30, noon to 1:30 p.m.
Bay City: Tuesday, October 1, noon to 1:30 p.m.

Pacific City: Tuesday, October 1, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Rockaway: Wednesday, October 2, noon to 1:30 p.m.
Main Library: Wednesday, October 2, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Goal Setting Workshop

Mayor Shaena Peterson has announced that the Goal Setting Committee would meet September 24 at 6 p.m. in the Council chambers. The Goal Setting Committee will follow up on the Vision Plan and consider possible urban renewal projects.

I heard a nasty rumor that our mayor has a birthday in September. So, happy birthday, Shaena, and may you enjoy many, many more.

Bears

Tom Imhoff told me a while back that he had spotted recent bear sign near Jacoby Creek. From the size of the critter’s scat and paw prints, Tom thought it was a large adult. He said he believed the bear was concentrating on skunk cabbage and huckleberries. The blackberries are fading, but there are still enough of them still on the canes to attract bears. So, be on the lookout if you venture out into the wild. At this time of year, the bears will be trying to gain the weight they’ll need to see them through the winter.

Burning Restrictions

I was gratified to see that green sign once again displayed on the front of the fire station. Outside burning is again permitted. The rains have dampened the area sufficiently to allow open burning as well as burning in barrels, provided you have a proper burn permit.

Remember to have a charged hose nearby if you are open burning.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

Dinner at Downie’s Café

Sadly, Downie’s is no longer serving dinners. Sharline and I had some wonderful dinners there, and are sorry that the dinners have been discontinued. While having lunch there last Friday, Karen Malcom explained to me that there was not enough traffic to justify continuing serving dinners. And, she noted, the kitchen is really not ideally suited for preparing dinner meals. And, since Downie’s has no liquor license, they couldn’t serve wine, as many diners would like.

But it was good while it lasted.

ArtSpace

ArtSpace has been renamed Museum of People’s Art.

They continue to serve smoothies and other goodies, according to the signs on one of the front windows. I’ve been meaning to get down there after a long hiatus to check it out, but there always seems to be a hotter brush fire that needs to be addressed.

Also, note the new name neatly lettered on the front window.

 

Bay City Arts Center

Breanna Moran continues her series on Intermediate Adult Painting. These sessions take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday evenings. Cost of four sessions is $65 for the public and $55 for BCAC members. Or, you can drop in for $18, or $15 if you are a BCAC member. You must bring your own materials. Check the BCAC Facebook page for the complete schedule.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, Oct. 20. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

Open Studio: BCAC is open for artistic exploration Wednesday evenings from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your own materials and make some art!

In October, a full day class on Pine Needle Basket Weaving will be held Saturday, October 5, and a half-day class will be held Sunday, October 6.

October 12, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., will be cleanup day at the Arts Center. They need volunteers to come down and help spruce up the Center.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. All levels are welcome.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend, but donations are welcome to help cover the cost of utilities.

The Board of Directors meets the first Monday of each month. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you want to get on the agenda, contact Dia Norris at gnorris@oregoncoast.com.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

The Arts Center has run into difficulties with its Web site. But you can still access the Arts Center’s Facebook page. The Arts Center is continuing to work on its Web site, but if you have questions, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Newport Visual Arts Center

From Pattern to Painting: The Art of the Marbled Surface

One-of-a-kind paintings on hand-marbled surfaces by Jean Blatner, Susan Cowan, Sandy Dutko, Airi Foote, Carol Sands and Liz Walker are on display in the Runyan Gallery at the Newport Visual Arts Center from through September 29, 2013. The exhibit is free and open to the public. A reception will be held September 6, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Liz Walker will give an artist’s talk at 5:30 p.m. in the Runyan Gallery. Refreshments will be served. The exhibit is sponsored by the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts (OCCA),

These Portland area artists, who first learned to marble from fellow artist and instructor Susan Cowan, have been experimenting with paints and paper for more than five years, creating their own modern version of an artistic practice called ebru marbling that dates back to the Ottoman Empire.

Paper marbling is a method of aqueous surface design which can produce patterns similar to smooth marble or other stone. The patterns are the result of color floated on a viscous solution known as “size,” and combined with a stylus or rake before being carefully transferred to an absorbent surface such as paper or canvas. Part of its appeal is that each print is a unique monotype. Not content to marble solely on paper and canvas surfaces, these painters have also marbled baskets, wooden boxes, dried gourds and other objects, some of which are included in this exhibit.

Liz Walker will teach a water media workshop, “From Marbled Paper to Finished Painting,” on Saturday, September 7, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Walker will teach students how to glaze and layer over pre-marbled papers. Marbled papers will be provided.

The Runyan Gallery is on the first floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

River Mantra

Tillamook County artist Christine Harrison will exhibit “River Mantra,” pastel drawings, and acrylic and oil paintings in the Coastal Oregon Visual Artists’ Showcase on the second floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center through October 26. There will be an opening reception for Christine Friday, September 6, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Christine is a painter and sculptor. Her most recent sculpture project, three large cement cows, was a joint venture with Heidi Clemens and the 2010 Ford Family Foundation Tillamook Leadership Candidates. The cows are prominently displayed at three locations in Tillamook County.

Christine has a Masters in Fine Arts earned at the College of Fine Arts in Oakland, California. She has created an intergenerational art program for underserved populations of senior citizens and inner city public school children. Her work is imbued with a power of nature theme. Her works have been shown in one-person exhibits in many locations in the Unites States.

She will be the featured speaker at the September Exhibition Coffee for Docents and Volunteers, and anyone interested in volunteering at the Visual Arts Center at 11 a.m. October 10 in Room 302, Visual Arts Center.

The Visual Arts Showcase, an outreach program featuring mid-career visual artists, is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.

Bearing Witness

Amber Sprague shows her work, “Bearing Witness,” in the Upstairs Gallery of the Visual Arts Center from Sept. 6 through Sept. 28. The Oregon Coast Council for the Arts will host an opening reception for her Sept. 6 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Amber holds a Masters in Teaching from Lewis and Clark College with an endorsement in art education. She will be teaching art the Newport Intermediate School and Isaac Newton Magnet School this year.

Amber’s personal artwork aims to raise the level of awareness of global social issues, particularly the education of all girls and universal access to clean water. Though not able to eradicate widespread poverty with a single solution, she said, she can bear witness to the real stories and hope found in the midst of those seemingly unsolvable problems. She strives to build an earthy, raw tactile experience that places the viewer in the life of the subject.

She will donate 30 percent of any sales of her work during the exhibit to Bridging the Gap, a non-profit organization working to raise awareness and funds to dig clean water wells in developing countries.

The Upstairs Gallery is located on the third floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center.

Oregon Council for the Arts is a nonprofit arts organization and the regional arts council for Curry, Coos, Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsop Counties, and the coastal towns of Douglas and Lane Counties. OCCA brings high quality arts experiences to the Coast. The Coastal Oregon Visual Artists Showcase features mid-career artists within the arts council.

The Newport Visual Arts Center is located at 777 NW Beach Drive on the beach in the historic Nye Beach area of Newport. For further information about the Newport Visual Arts Center and the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, go to the Links page and click on the link for the Center, or call OCCA VAC Director Sally Houck at (541) 265-6569.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad

The Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad continues to offer new opportunities to enjoy our beautiful part of the Northwest.

The OCSR recently leased much of the Port of Tillamook Bay trackage which remains intact, and the railroad has been working diligently ensure the safety of the roadbed and clear it of the vegetation that has encroached since the storms of 2007.

On October 5, OCSR plans an all-day excursion from Garibaldi to Batterson and back. The trip will take seven and one-half hours and include stops at Rockaway Beach and Wheeler. The trip to Batterson will take you along the Nehalem River in early fall, when fall colors should be at their height. There will be at least three photo run-bys.

The train will be pulled by the McCloud River #25, a Prairie type, wheel arrangement 2-6-2, a historic steam locomotive that was used in the trestle scene of the movie, “Stand by Me.” The consist will include two coaches, one open car and a baggage car.

Reservations will be required, and the cost of the excursion will be $98 per person. There are only 120 seats available, so reservations should be made sooner rather than later. For further information, please call (503) 292-5055.

Bits and Pieces

Mama deer and her twins continue to do very well in my yard. They’ve been in my side or front yard nearly every day lately. If they keep up what they’re doing, I won’t have to run my lawn tractor.

Those little twins have certainly grown during the summer, and their spots are nearly gone. The little guys are not nearly so prone to getting spooked as they were earlier in the summer. The other morning, as I backed out of my driveway and proceeded down the hill, the little guys just stood there and watched me.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be September 19 at 6 p.m.

 

September 12, 2013

BAY CITY, September 12, 2013 --- Summer is almost over, and, as of this writing, we’ve made it through 9-11 without a terrorist attack. Sunsets are now about 7:30, and they are getting earlier each day. We’re heading into the season of short days and long, dark nights. And winter storms. Are you prepared?

Judy Wadley

Bay City has lost a real treasure. Judy Wadley, our postmaster for many years, has gone to meet her Maker. Bay City isn’t the same without her. Judy’s eldest daughter, Tracy Nuzum, shares some thoughts about her mom. And, I’ve added a few of my own.

Judy Lasley Wadley, a Garibaldi native, was born in 1949 and attended Neah-Kah-Nie District schools. As a teenager, Judy said she’d never live in Bay City because “it’s a rat-infested town.” She was referring to Bay City’s infamous “Old Dump Road,” then the city’s unofficial repository for garbage and junk.

But she moved to town in 1968, and she’s lived here ever since. Judy started at the post office assisting Joanne Powell. When Joanne died about 1988, Judy was awarded the post office contract.

Judy, a devout Christian, worshiped at the Living Water Fellowship, and belonged to the Reflections on His Glory dance team. She was president of Tillamook AGLOW Lighthouse, and she held weekly Bible study at the Tillamook County Justice Center jail.

A very civic-minded person, she served many years as a member of Bay City’s Planning Commission. She leaves a vacant seat which will be difficult to fill.

As postmaster, Judy knew practically everyone in town. When I started writing the Fencepost for the Headlight-Herald in 1998, I asked if she could provide me some material to write about. I suppose there’s an unwritten code for hairdressers, bartenders and postmasters, because I received nary a word. She respected her patrons’ confidences, and their secrets were always safe with her.

People will always remember Judy’s infectious laugh. She found humor in everything. That was obvious to me when I got my post office box in 1994. I enjoyed stopping to chat with her whenever I picked up my mail. She always had something interesting to say.

I had a thing about Christmas cards, and Judy was always on the lookout to find me the ugliest stamps for me to mail those loathsome little tidings. One year she came up with vampires, another year it was reptiles, and in yet another it was rodents.

As a postmaster, Judy always went the extra mile for her patrons, sometimes bending the rules a bit but never breaking them. People appreciated it, and they appreciated her.

Last April Judy experienced a life-threatening medical emergency, and she was airlifted to OHSU Hospital. She had a malignancy, which responded nicely to treatment early on. She had surgery July 3, but the cancer proved very aggressive. On August 29, she ended up in ICU at Salem Memorial Hospital, where she had been receiving radiation therapy.

Knowing that little more could be done for her, she asked, simply, that she be brought home to spend her remaining time with her family. She arrived home at noon Tuesday, September 3, her birthday. She died peacefully at 3:45 Wednesday morning, surrounded by her family, save for her husband, Glen, who is a patient at the Nehalem Bay Care Center.

Her memorial service will be held at 10:30 a.m. Sept. 21, at the Church of the Nazarene in Tillamook. Tracy encourages Judy’s friends to share some stories about her mom.

Judy is survived by her husband, Glen Wadley, daughters Tracy Nuzum and Vicki Mintz, step children Billy Wadley and Theresa Roy, 15 grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

Tracy says we’ll know we’ve arrived in heaven. We’ll hear Judy laughing again.

Bay City Post Office

It’s common knowledge that the post office window is now closed. Information posted on the door window tells Bay City patrons that the window for retail business, i.e., purchase of stamps or registry of letters, is not available in Bay City for the present.

The signs also explain that Bay City’s post office is a contract operation. Although Judy’s family, that is, her daughter Vicki and her grandchildren, had been filling in for Judy, the contract was solely in Judy’s name. Therefore, upon her passing, the contract is null and void. The Tillamook postmaster is seeking another potential contractor to resume retail operations at the Bay City post office. That could take several months.

Until that happens, the post office boxes will be filled, but outgoing mail must be deposited in the outside mailbox. Mail deposited inside the building will not be collected. Customers receiving parcels too large to fit in their post office boxes will have to pick them up at the Tillamook post office.

We’re all hoping that a new contractor will be found sooner rather than later, but it just won’t be the same without our Judy.

Vacancies in City Government

We now have two vacancies on the Planning Commission, and another is expected in the not-too-distant future. One of our members wishes to resign as soon as a replacement can be found. To apply to fill these vacancies, you need only fill out an application at the city office. Applicants may expect to be interviewed. We expect more land use issues to arise as the economy improves, and we’ll need a full Commission. Presently, we’re finishing up on making text amendments to the Developent Ordinance.

Help the Library Plan for the Future

The Tillamook County Library is working on a needs assessment to plan the Library of the Future, for the next 10 to 20 years. Open houses will be held at all branches between Sept. 27 and Oct. 2. Those attending the open houses will have an opportunity to give their input.

There will be demonstrations of eBook readers and Library databases, and refreshments will be provided. County Librarian Sara Charlton invites everyone to attend an open house and see what the future holds, and explore the Library’s electronic services.

Open House Schedule:

Manzanita: Friday, September 27, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Garibaldi: Monday, September 30, noon to 1:30 p.m.
Bay City: Tuesday, October 1, noon to 1:30 p.m.

Pacific City: Tuesday, October 1, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Rockaway: Wednesday, October 2, noon to 1:30 p.m.
Main Library: Wednesday, October 2, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Bears

Tom Imhoff told me a while back that he had spotted recent bear sign near Jacoby Creek. From the size of the critter’s scat and paw prints, Tom thought it was a large adult. He said he believed the bear was concentrating on skunk cabbage and huckleberries. The blackberries are now at their height, and they attract bears as well. So, be on the lookout if you venture out into the wild. At this time of year, the bears will be trying to gain the weight they’ll need to see them through the winter.

City Council News

The Bay City Council held its monthly meeting Tuesday, Sept. 10.

Mayor Shaena Peterson opened the public hearing on proposed Bay City Ordinance 657, which would set a transient room tax for short-term rentals in Bay City. Affected businesses would include campgrounds, trailer parks and the yurt in Goose Point. City Recorder Linda Downey said she had been unable to determine exactly how many businesses would be affected.

Becky Smith, who co-owns the yurt, offered public testimony, asking why it is necessary to enact the tax now. She was concerned about charging her clientele the 10 percent tax, and noted that the yurt is booked up from February through October. Becky added that she had some concerns about the ordinance as originally drafted, but stated that she was more comfortable with it now.

City Attorney Lois Albright said she had been advised by the Tillamook Community Development Department that the City of Bay City could enact its ordinance after the November ballot, on which the County transient room tax will appear, and still be able to keep its full percentage. But, she cautioned, the county ordinance is open to interpretation on that issue.

The Council continued the public hearing to its Oct. 8 meeting, when it is anticipated that the Council will vote on the issue.

Wendy Schink asked the Council to rescind a stop work order she had received with regard to some excavating she had been doing on her property, stating that the amount of material removed was less than 12 cubic feet, the threshold for obtaining a grading and erosion control permit. Public Works Superintendent David Pace said that the work was being done on a slope of more than 12 percent, as verified by City Planner Sabrina Pearson.

David noted that with the grade, as verified by the City Planner, required the installation of silt fencing to protect downhill properties from silt runoff during wet weather. Wendy stated that she had intended to plant grass before the rains, but said she would apply for a grading and erosion control permit.

Tony Troyer addressed the Council, stating that he also had received a stop work order on Bay View Street, which is a hazard area.

Mayor Shaena Peterson explained that the Council could not ask staff to rescind the stop work orders, but directed staff to act expeditiously on the two complaints and report back to the next Council meeting.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith reported that the Map Your Neighborhood program was going well, and that about 12 people had signed up to be block captains during emergencies. He said he was encouraged that emergency preparedness was becoming very much a citizen operation, freeing up his fire department for other duties. It is easier for the block captains to watch and report on their neighborhoods than it is for the department’s 24 firefighters. “It’s a big help,” he said, “to have the block captains feeding him information.”

Discussion was held on the City’s assumption of meter reading and billing for the Juno Nonprofit Water Improvement District. The transition had required more staff time than initially anticipated. Attorney Albright suggested compiling a report of the number of hours of staff time the conversion is costing the City, noting that, “we’re not subsidizing Juno.”

Further discussion was held regarding pumps and water pressure, noting that some pressures are as low as 20 psi. David explained that several high elevation properties are served by pumps with pressure tanks.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith also explained the need for a new pumper truck, adding that some equipment is now approaching 20 years in age. The time is right, he said to nail down a price for a new truck, which likely would not be delivered for two years. Counselor Robert Pollock said that, “It’s a good time to buy a new fire truck.” The Council authorized Darrell to proceed with procurement of the truck.

The Council adopted Resolution 13-16, exempting a bid from 4B Engineering and Consulting, LLC, to provide engineering services at the City’s wellhead from competitive bidding, and authorized the mayor to sign the contract. 4B Engineering will engineer electrical services for the wells, with capacity to support a third well and pump, when drilled and installed, to be located in a control building away from the pumps. The need for the engineering was prompted by a recent failure of an electric transfer switch to activate the generator in case of power failure. The switch had gotten wet from an incident in the pump house, but, fortunately, didn’t short out the system. Engineering is also required for the needed drilling of a third well. 4B Engineering had agreed to perform the work for a cost not to exceed $18,330.

Presently, there are two wells operating. Demand for water has increased, David reported, so that a single pump cannot provide enough water by itself. The second pump has been coming on during the day. If a pump fails, the Kilchis Regional Water District would not be able to meet the demand without a source of additional water. One such source, David said, is the intertie with the Tillamook water system, subject to agreement with the City of Tillamook. That makes the demand for a third well much more pressing.

Councilor Gettman noted that there is enough money in the budget to proceed with the third well immediately, and urged that it be done.

The property at 7895 18th Street continues to plague the Council. The property has been without water and electricity for a considerable time, and has been the subject of several nuisance and abatement notices. David noted that a trailer had been moved onto the property, and placed on leveling blocks. He was not sure what type of trailer it was, but it was suggested that it is a “job shack,” the type moved onto large construction sites.

Shaena reported that she had recently been to a mayors’ meeting, and asked her fellow mayors whether they had had similar problems, and how they handled them. She reported that Bay City is not alone, and that no city had found a good way to deal with the problem.

The Council adopted motions declaring a nuisance pursuant to the Nuisance Ordinance and directing staff to determine whether the trailer violates any provision of the Development Ordinance. Staff was authorized to proceed with the abatement process, giving the owner until Sept. 22 to comply, and authorized staff to remove the offending material if the owner does not.

Cost of the abatement will be added to the value of the City’s lien against the property.

David reported that the first Alderbrook undercrossing is nearing completion and the second undercrossing is ready to go out to bid. He also reported that the intertie with Tillamook is complete. The City has received its FEMA reimbursement, and only $24,250.55 owed by the City of Tillamook for its share of the cost needs to be collected.

The Council took under advisement the Public Works request to purchase a used excavator. David was instructed to obtain prices and report to the Council in October. Lois reminded David of the need to obtain competitive bids if the Council authorizes purchase of the excavator.

Property located at 4th and D Streets has had a problem with water draining through the property, and forming a pond during the rainy season. It was noted that the drainage is a part of the City’s drainage plan. The property owner had wanted the City to install a culvert to carry the water, in that the water runs through private property, David was instructed to see whether the owner would grant the City an easement for the drainage.

The Council also adopted a proclamation submitted by the Daughters of the American Revolution, that the week, Sept. 17 through 23, be observed as Constitution Week.

The Council discussed a proposition to close the Warren Street crossing, and build a highway crossing using the Spruce Street right-of-way. This would also substitute for a crossing to the Museum property from Alderbrook. The Spruce Street crossing has the advantage of being at a right angle to Highway 101. It was also noted that the railroad tracks are unacceptably close to the highway. It was also noted that a building presently occupies the Spruce Street right-of-way on the Museum property.

Mayor Peterson announced that the Goal Setting Committee would meet September 24 at 6 p.m. The Goal Setting Committee will follow up on the Vision Plan and consider the possibility of urban renewal projects.

 

Burning Restrictions

Total outdoor restrictions went into effect August 1. Burning in barrels was allowed for a few days following the recent rains. But, with the weather drying out again, the total ban on outdoor burning has been reinstituted. NO OUTDOOR BURNING until further notice.

Small fires are permitted in outdoor barbecue pits and fireplaces, provided they are monitored and completely extinguished after use.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

Dinner at Downie’s Café

Sadly, Downie’s is no longer serving dinners. Sharline and I had some wonderful dinners there, and are sorry that the dinners have been discontinued. While having lunch there last Friday, Karen Malcom explained to me that there was not enough traffic to justify continuing serving dinners. And, she noted, the kitchen is really not ideally suited for preparing dinner meals. And, since Downie’s has no liquor license, they couldn’t serve wine, as many diners would like.

But it was good while it lasted.

ArtSpace

ArtSpace has been renamed Museum of People’s Art.

They continue to serve smoothies and other goodies, according to the signs on one of the front windows. I’ve been meaning to get down there after a long hiatus to check it out, but there always seems to be a hotter brush fire that needs to be addressed.

Also, note the new name neatly lettered on the front window.

Bay City Arts Center

Breanna Moran continues her series on Intermediate Adult Painting. These sessions take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday evenings. Cost of four sessions is $65 for the public and $55 for BCAC members. Or, you can drop in for $18, or $15 if you are a BCAC member. You must bring your own materials. Check the BCAC Facebook page for the complete schedule.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, Sep. 15. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

Open Studio: BCAC is open for artistic exploration Wednesday evenings from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your own materials and make some art!

In October, a full day class on Pine Needle Basket Weaving will be held Saturday, October 5, and a half-day class will be held Sunday, October 6.

October 12, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., will be cleanup day at the Arts Center. They need volunteers to come down and help spruce up the Center.

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. All levels are welcome.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend, but donations are welcome to help cover the cost of utilities.

The Board of Directors meets the first Monday of each month. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you want to get on the agenda, contact Dia Norris at gnorris@oregoncoast.com.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

The Arts Center has run into difficulties with its Web site. But you can still access the Arts Center’s Facebook page. The Arts Center is continuing to work on its Web site, but if you have questions, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Newport Visual Arts Center

From Pattern to Painting: The Art of the Marbled Surface

One-of-a-kind paintings on hand-marbled surfaces by Jean Blatner, Susan Cowan, Sandy Dutko, Airi Foote, Carol Sands and Liz Walker are on display in the Runyan Gallery at the Newport Visual Arts Center from through September 29, 2013. The exhibit is free and open to the public. A reception will be held September 6, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Liz Walker will give an artist’s talk at 5:30 p.m. in the Runyan Gallery. Refreshments will be served. The exhibit is sponsored by the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts (OCCA),

These Portland area artists, who first learned to marble from fellow artist and instructor Susan Cowan, have been experimenting with paints and paper for more than five years, creating their own modern version of an artistic practice called ebru marbling that dates back to the Ottoman Empire.

Paper marbling is a method of aqueous surface design which can produce patterns similar to smooth marble or other stone. The patterns are the result of color floated on a viscous solution known as “size,” and combined with a stylus or rake before being carefully transferred to an absorbent surface such as paper or canvas. Part of its appeal is that each print is a unique monotype. Not content to marble solely on paper and canvas surfaces, these painters have also marbled baskets, wooden boxes, dried gourds and other objects, some of which are included in this exhibit.

Liz Walker will teach a water media workshop, “From Marbled Paper to Finished Painting,” on Saturday, September 7, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Walker will teach students how to glaze and layer over pre-marbled papers. Marbled papers will be provided.

The Runyan Gallery is on the first floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

River Mantra

Tillamook County artist Christine Harrison will exhibit “River Mantra,” pastel drawings, and acrylic and oil paintings in the Coastal Oregon Visual Artists’ Showcase on the second floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center through October 26. There will be an opening reception for Christine Friday, September 6, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Christine is a painter and sculptor. Her most recent sculpture project, three large cement cows, was a joint venture with Heidi Clemens and the 2010 Ford Family Foundation Tillamook Leadership Candidates. The cows are prominently displayed at three locations in Tillamook County.

Christine has a Masters in Fine Arts earned at the College of Fine Arts in Oakland, California. She has created an intergenerational art program for underserved populations of senior citizens and inner city public school children. Her work is imbued with a power of nature theme. Her works have been shown in one-person exhibits in many locations in the Unites States.

She will be the featured speaker at the September Exhibition Coffee for Docents and Volunteers, and anyone interested in volunteering at the Visual Arts Center at 11 a.m. October 10 in Room 302, Visual Arts Center.

The Visual Arts Showcase, an outreach program featuring mid-career visual artists, is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.

Bearing Witness

Amber Sprague shows her work, “Bearing Witness,” in the Upstairs Gallery of the Visual Arts Center from Sept. 6 through Sept. 28. The Oregon Coast Council for the Arts will host an opening reception for her Sept. 6 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Amber holds a Masters in Teaching from Lewis and Clark College with an endorsement in art education. She will be teaching art the Newport Intermediate School and Isaac Newton Magnet School this year.

Amber’s personal artwork aims to raise the level of awareness of global social issues, particularly the education of all girls and universal access to clean water. Though not able to eradicate widespread poverty with a single solution, she said, she can bear witness to the real stories and hope found in the midst of those seemingly unsolvable problems. She strives to build an earthy, raw tactile experience that places the viewer in the life of the subject.

She will donate 30 percent of any sales of her work during the exhibit to Bridging the Gap, a non-profit organization working to raise awareness and funds to dig clean water wells in developing countries.

The Upstairs Gallery is located on the third floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center.

Oregon Council for the Arts is a nonprofit arts organization and the regional arts council for Curry, Coos, Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsop Counties, and the coastal towns of Douglas and Lane Counties. OCCA brings high quality arts experiences to the Coast. The Coastal Oregon Visual Artists Showcase features mid-career artists within the arts council.

The Newport Visual Arts Center is located at 777 NW Beach Drive on the beach in the historic Nye Beach area of Newport. For further information about the Newport Visual Arts Center and the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, go to the Links page and click on the link for the Center, or call OCCA VAC Director Sally Houck at (541) 265-6569.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad

The Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad continues to offer new opportunities to enjoy our beautiful part of the Northwest.

The OCSR recently leased much of the Port of Tillamook Bay trackage which remains intact, and the railroad has been working diligently ensure the safety of the roadbed and clear it of the vegetation that has encroached since the storms of 2007.

On October 5, OCSR plans an all-day excursion from Garibaldi to Batterson and back. The trip will take seven and one-half hours and include stops at Rockaway Beach and Wheeler. The trip to Batterson will take you along the Nehalem River in early fall, when fall colors should be at their height. There will be at least three photo run-bys.

The train will be pulled by the McCloud River #25, a Prairie type, wheel arrangement 2-6-2, a historic steam locomotive that was used in the trestle scene of the movie, “Stand by Me.” The consist will include two coaches, one open car and a baggage car.

Reservations will be required, and the cost of the excursion will be $98 per person. There are only 120 seats available, so reservations should be made sooner rather than later. For further information, please call (503) 292-5055.

Bits and Pieces

This has been truly the summer of the doctor, and I’m glad it’s nearing its end. My yard looks like a wreck because I’ve not had the time to do any mowing. Yesterday morning I had to take Sharline to the Urgent Care clinic in Tillamook. Happily they were able to prescribe something to help her.

Sharline and I are looking forward to our 61st wedding anniversary, when we will visit with our daughters. I need a day off!

Mama deer and her twins continue to do very well in my yard. The other afternoon, as I came up my drive, there the twins were, now much grown and their spots fading, standing, eating grass by my burn barrel. They watched me coming slowly up the hill, but as I approached the turn to my garage, they decided that their safety was in danger and bolted off in search of mama. It looks like mama has taught them well.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be September 19 at 6 p.m.

 

September 3, 2013

BAY CITY, September 3, 2013 --- In case you haven’t heard, Karen Rust has joined Sharline’s club, the Bay City Tumblers. She took a spill at Camp Magruder recently and came out somewhat the worse for wear. For this, and for her planned holiday, she has asked me to write her Fencepost for her. So, for a while, you’ll have to put up with me in the Headlight-Herald as well as in the Grapevine.

The Wadley Family

Judy Wadley had been recovering at home, but had to go to the Valley for treatment. Vicki Mintz, her daughter, told me earlier that Judy had been thinking about returning to work in October. Glen is still recovering at a care center in North County.

But Friday, Vicki told me that her mom was not doing too well. She needs our prayers right now.

And, to add insult to injury, none of the Wadleys’ medical care and rehabilitation comes cheaply. Glen can look forward to lots more rehabilitation, and Judy has a long road ahead of her as well. Their medical expenses are mounting, and it’s difficult to imagine how these obligations can be paid.

Glen and Judy have an account at U.S. Bank in Tillamook. If you would like to help them out, you can deposit a financial gift for them at the Tillamook branch, or at any other branch if you happen to be out of town. You should give the teller Judy Wadley’s name. If further identification is required, you should explain that they have a Bay City address.

Everybody in Bay City certainly knows Judy, our postmaster for many, many years. She was postmaster when Sharline and I first moved to town, and was the first person I met when I applied for a post office box. I have gone to U.S. Bank and deposited a donation to help them in their time of need, and I hope you do the same. If we pull together, we can do much to ease the tremendous financial burden Glen and Judy both face.

Vacancies in City Government

We still have one vacancy in the Planning Commission right now, and another is expected in the not-too-distant future. One of our members wishes to resign as soon as a replacement can be found. To apply to fill these vacancies, you need only fill out an application at the city office. Applicants may expect to be interviewed. We expect more land use issues to arise as the economy improves, and we’ll need a full Commission. Presently, we’re finishing up on making text amendments to the Developent Ordinance.

Bears

Tom Imhoff told me a while back that he had spotted recent bear sign near Jacoby Creek. From the size of the critter’s scat and paw prints, Tom thought it was a large adult. He said he believed the bear was concentrating on skunk cabbage and huckleberries. The blackberries are now at their height, and they attract bears as well. So, be on the lookout if you venture out into the wild. At this time of year, the bears will be trying to gain the weight they’ll need to see them through the winter.

City News

The Planning Commission met last Wednesday to hear some issues and receive a report from Public Works Superintendent David Pace.

Becky Smith, who owns a historic house on the bay shore, was in the audience to hear  a discussion of changes to the FEMA flood insurance rates imposed by the Congress in 2012. Basically, rate increases for properties located on the beach or where they can be impacted by severe weather and flood events have been described as “astronomical.”

To “ease” the burden, the rates will reach their full amount over a five-year period, increasing by one-fifth of the extra premium cost each year.

This is little comfort for the people affected by this action. Becky and Diane Zink, who co-owns the property, wrote a detailed letter when the changes were first announced, addressed to the president, their elected representatives in the congress and the state legislature, as well as a host of other interested parties. Becky said she had received responses from many addressees already.

Becky explained that her house is about 12 feet above mean high water, and that her yurt also conforms to flood standards in effect at the time it was installed. She also explained that her foundation is properly vented so that high water can pass under the house.

The National Flood Insurance Program carries with it a number of other issues that will affect cities containing floodplains, like Bay City. City Planner Sabrina Pearson advised that Bay City’s Flood Damage Regulations, Ordinance 467, will require some changes to become compliant with the new rules. Likewise, the City will have to establish or redefine its flood hazard overlay zones.

New velocity flood zone maps are being prepared, but will not be released until they’ve been fully vetted, so, until then, the City won’t know all the areas affected. These maps are based on the LIDAR mapping done several years ago.

FEMA representatives recently met with the Board of County Commissioners and other stakeholders about implementation of the revised rules.

David Pace provided a report on shoreline stabilization. Some shoreline has riprap for stabilization, and some does not. Planning Chair Terry Griffin has noted on several occasions that the bay shoreline is changing. He noted that the sea level in rising, and that parts of Kilchis Point and Goose Point are eroding.

Erosion has also been noted on the bay shoreline near the town houses at the foot of Tillamook Avenue.

David said that placing more riprap along the bay sore is not permitted. The reason is that if you riprap some, you must riprap all, otherwise non-riprapped areas will erode.

The question had arisen at a previous Planning Commission meeting, what could be done to prevent bay shoreline erosion from affecting the sewage treatment ponds? Should the pond walls fail, the flow of sewage outflow and sludge would cause an ecological disaster.

David reported that the Department of State Lands, which has jurisdiction, would allow a trench to be dug and filled with riprap at least 50 feet inland from the shoreline and any wetland lying between the treatment ponds and the shoreline.

This, he said, would require removal of 2,000 yards of material and placement of 1,500 yards of riprap rock. That would require approximately 300 loads of material. Because of the increased truck travel through the area, David reported that he is negotiating with Tillamook PUD about acquiring the site of the old substation on McCoy Street to provide a private access to the Public Works Department.

Homeowners along the shoreline, Dave added, would be able to do the same as the City, but would have to do the work at their own expense after obtaining a permit. Then, David said, if the shoreline eroded to the trenched riprap, the riprap could be maintained at that point.

Firefighter Annual Picnic

The annual firefighter picnic was well attended and enjoyed by all who came. According to Fire Chief Darrell Griffith, they fed 150 people.

In addition to the great dogs and burgers cooked to perfection by Bay City’s firefighters, there were many tempting dishes brought by the community. Sharline and I joined John and Dorothy Gettman for an excellent lunch, topped off with some ice cream.

Our neighbors, the Olivers, joined us, and later, I had a nice visit with our former fire chief, Don Reynolds. He said he is in the process of residing his house. This is a good time to get it done, because the rains are not far off.

There were a few additional features as well. Liane Welch and Larry Goss signed up additional Block Captains for Map Your Neighborhood, a part of our emergency preparedness effort. These are volunteer jobs that involve looking after one’s neighbors during an emergency.

The Fire Department was taking sign-ups for installation of new smoke alarms, a program under the aegis of the State Fire Marshal. The new alarms have long-lasting batteries, 10 years, I’m told, and the best thing about them is that they’re free. The alarms will be installed during the month of September, by appointment. I believe there are still sign-up sheets at City Hall if you missed the picnic and would like to sign up. You never can tell when one of these devices just might save your life.

Emergency Preparedness

The next Emergency Preparedness meeting will be September 11, 5:30 p.m., at the fire station. I don’t know what’s on the agenda, but I’ll let you know as soon as I find out. I suspect that it will be a rundown on the signups for Block Captains.

Burning Restrictions

Total outdoor restrictions went into effect August 1.

However, effective last Wednesday, barrel burning opened up. Sufficient rain had fallen to ease the fire danger here on the Oregon Coast. But, always check the sign on the front wall of the fire station for the current burning status. With the weather drying out again, the ban on all outdoor burning could be reimposed.

Small fires are permitted in outdoor barbecue pits and fireplaces, provided they are monitored and completely extinguished after use.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

 

 

Dinner at Downie’s Café

Sadly, Downie’s is no longer serving dinners. Sharline and I had some wonderful dinners there, and are sorry that the dinners have been discontinued. While having lunch there last Friday, Karen Malcom explained to me that there was not enough traffic to justify continuing serving dinners. And, she noted, the kitchen is really not ideally suited for preparing dinner meals. And, since Downie’s has no liquor license, they couldn’t serve wine, as many diners would like.

But it was good while it lasted.

ArtSpace

ArtSpace has been renamed Museum of People’s Art.

They continue to serve smoothies and other goodies, according to the signs on one of the front windows. I’ve been meaning to get down there after a long hiatus to check it out, but there always seems to be a hotter brush fire that needs to be addressed.

Also, note the new name neatly lettered on the front window.

Bay City Arts Center

So far, there is no word on the Artist of the Month for September. I saw Dia Norris the other day, and she told me that the Jews Harp Festival was canceled abruptly, and this has thrown other planning into a quandary. I’ll miss the festival this year. It was always a fun time for Bay City.

Breanna Moran continues her series on Intermediate Adult Painting. These sessions take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday evenings. Cost of four sessions is $65 for the public and $55 for BCAC members. Or, you can drop in for $18, or $15 if you are a BCAC member. You must bring your own materials. Check the BCAC Facebook page for the complete schedule.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, Sep. 15. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

Open Studio: BCAC is open for artistic exploration Wednesday evenings from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your own materials and make some art!

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. All levels are welcome.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend, but donations are welcome to help cover the cost of utilities.

The Board of Directors meets the first Monday of each month. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you want to get on the agenda, contact Dia Norris at gnorris@oregoncoast.com.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

The Arts Center has run into difficulties with its Web site. But you can still access the Arts Center’s Facebook page. The Arts Center is continuing to work on its Web site, but if you have questions, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Newport Visual Arts Center

From Pattern to Painting: The Art of the Marbled Surface

One-of-a-kind paintings on hand-marbled surfaces by Jean Blatner, Susan Cowan, Sandy Dutko, Airi Foote, Carol Sands and Liz Walker are on display in the Runyan Gallery at the Newport Visual Arts Center from through September 29, 2013. The exhibit is free and open to the public. A reception will be held September 6, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Liz Walker will give an artist’s talk at 5:30 p.m. in the Runyan Gallery. Refreshments will be served. The exhibit is sponsored by the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts (OCCA),

These Portland area artists, who first learned to marble from fellow artist and instructor Susan Cowan, have been experimenting with paints and paper for more than five years, creating their own modern version of an artistic practice called ebru marbling that dates back to the Ottoman Empire.

Paper marbling is a method of aqueous surface design which can produce patterns similar to smooth marble or other stone. The patterns are the result of color floated on a viscous solution known as “size,” and combined with a stylus or rake before being carefully transferred to an absorbent surface such as paper or canvas. Part of its appeal is that each print is a unique monotype. Not content to marble solely on paper and canvas surfaces, these painters have also marbled baskets, wooden boxes, dried gourds and other objects, some of which are included in this exhibit.

Liz Walker will teach a water media workshop, “From Marbled Paper to Finished Painting,” on Saturday, September 7, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Walker will teach students how to glaze and layer over pre-marbled papers. Marbled papers will be provided.

The Runyan Gallery is on the first floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

River Mantra

Tillamook County artist Christine Harrison will exhibit “River Mantra,” pastel drawings, and acrylic and oil paintings in the Coastal Oregon Visual Artists’ Showcase on the second floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center through October 26. There will be an opening reception for Christine Friday, September 6, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Christine is a painter and sculptor. Her most recent sculpture project, three large cement cows, was a joint venture with Heidi Clemens and the 2010 Ford Family Foundation Tillamook Leadership Candidates. The cows are prominently displayed at three locations in Tillamook County.

Christine has a Masters in Fine Arts earned at the College of Fine Arts in Oakland, California. She has created an intergenerational art program for underserved populations of senior citizens and inner city public school children. Her work is imbued with a power of nature theme. Her works have been shown in one-person exhibits in many locations in the Unites States.

She will be the featured speaker at the September Exhibition Coffee for Docents and Volunteers, and anyone interested in volunteering at the Visual Arts Center at 11 a.m. October 10 in Room 302, Visual Arts Center.

The Visual Arts Showcase, an outreach program featuring mid-career visual artists, is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.

Bearing Witness

Amber Sprague shows her work, “Bearing Witness,” in the Upstairs Gallery of the Visual Arts Center from Sept. 6 through Sept. 28. The Oregon Coast Council for the Arts will host an opening reception for her Sept. 6 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Amber holds a Masters in Teaching from Lewis and Clark College with an endorsement in art education. She will be teaching art the Newport Intermediate School and Isaac Newton Magnet School this year.

Amber’s personal artwork aims to raise the level of awareness of global social issues, particularly the education of all girls and universal access to clean water. Though not able to eradicate widespread poverty with a single solution, she said, she can bear witness to the real stories and hope found in the midst of those seemingly unsolvable problems. She strives to build an earthy, raw tactile experience that places the viewer in the life of the subject.

She will donate 30 percent of any sales of her work during the exhibit to Bridging the Gap, a non-profit organization working to raise awareness and funds to dig clean water wells in developing countries.

The Upstairs Gallery is located on the third floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center.

Oregon Council for the Arts is a nonprofit arts organization and the regional arts council for Curry, Coos, Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsop Counties, and the coastal towns of Douglas and Lane Counties. OCCA brings high quality arts experiences to the Coast. The Coastal Oregon Visual Artists Showcase features mid-career artists within the arts council.

The Newport Visual Arts Center is located at 777 NW Beach Drive on the beach in the historic Nye Beach area of Newport. For further information about the Newport Visual Arts Center and the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, go to the Links page and click on the link for the Center, or call OCCA VAC Director Sally Houck at (541) 265-6569.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad

The Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad continues to offer new opportunities to enjoy our beautiful part of the Northwest.

The OCSR recently leased much of the Port of Tillamook Bay trackage which remains intact, and the railroad has been working diligently ensure the safety of the roadbed and clear it of the vegetation that has encroached since the storms of 2007.

On October 5, OCSR plans an all-day excursion from Garibaldi to Batterson and back. The trip will take seven and one-half hours and include stops at Rockaway Beach and Wheeler. The trip to Batterson will take you along the Nehalem River in early fall, when fall colors should be at their height. There will be at least three photo run-bys.

The train will be pulled by the McCloud River #25, a Prairie type, wheel arrangement 2-6-2, a historic steam locomotive that was used in the trestle scene of the movie, “Stand by Me.” The consist will include two coaches, one open car and a baggage car.

Reservations will be required, and the cost of the excursion will be $98 per person. There are only 120 seats available, so reservations should be made sooner rather than later. For further information, please call (503) 292-5055.

Bits and Pieces

Sharline is doing much better since receiving her pacemaker. And, it seems to be doing its job, according to a test done at her cardiologist’s office a week ago.

I called my kid brother yesterday to wish him a happy birthday. We talked for about 30 minutes. Talking for him is difficult because he had a left-brain stroke several months back. But he’s doing great in that regard. And, I learned that he has been using a pacemaker for about 15 years. You can tell I don’t get to see much of my family because they’re all on the east coast.

Mama deer and her twins are doing very well in my yard. They seem to thrive on my dandelions, which gives me a great excuse not to mow. I wouldn’t want to rob these lovely little critters of their munchies.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be September 19 at 6 p.m.

 

 

August 16, 2013

BAY CITY, August 16, 2013 --- Here it is, warts and all. Lots to write about this week.

The Wadley Family

Judy Wadley has been recovering at home, but must go to the Valley for a course of therapy. Vicki Mintz, her daughter, advised that Judy is thinking about returning to work in October. Glen is recovering at a care center in North County. Both are making progress.

None of the medical care and rehabilitation comes cheaply. Glen can look forward to lots more rehabilitation, and Judy has a long road ahead of her as well. Their medical expenses are mounting, and it is difficult to imagine how these obligations can be paid.

Glen and Judy have an account at U.S. Bank in Tillamook. If you would like to help them out, you can deposit a financial gift for them at the Tillamook branch, or at any other branch if you happen to be out of town. You should give the teller Judy Wadley’s name. If further identification is required, you should explain that they have a Bay City address.

Everybody in Bay City certainly knows Judy, our postmaster for many, many years. She was postmaster when Sharline and I first moved to town, and was the first person I met when I applied for a post office box. I have gone to U.S. Bank and deposited a donation to help them in their time of need, and I hope you do the same. If we pull together, we can do much to ease the tremendous financial burden Glen and Judy both face.

Vacancies in City Government

We still have one vacancy in the Planning Commission right now, and another is expected in the not-too-distant future. To apply to fill those vacancies, you need only fill out an application at the city office. Applicants may expect to be interviewed. Unlike our federal government, our planning commissioners really do work!

Bears

Thar’s b’ars about. Tom Imhoff told me a week ago that he had spotted recent bear sign near Jacoby Creek. From the size of the critter’s scat and paw prints, Tom thinks it is a large adult. He said he believes the bear was concentrating on skunk cabbage and huckleberries. The blackberries are coming on hot and heavy, and they attract bears as well. So, be on the lookout if you venture out into the wild. At this time of year, the bears will be trying to put on weight to see them through the winter.

City Council News

The City Council met Tuesday, August 13. As its first item of business, City Attorney Lois Albright swore in newly appointed City Council member Levi Cherry. Levi will serve out the remainder of Becky Smith’s term.

Under Visitors’ Presentations, Chuck Bartholet announced that the Tillamook Bay Boating Club had disbanded. There was some money remaining in the treasury, Chuck said, and the members voted to contribute the residue to four worthy organizations. He presented a check for $485.65 to the mayor, to be delivered to the Bay City Beautification Committee.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith announced that work on the new sidewalk outside the fire station had been completed. He said the total cost was $2,436. A significant portion of the work was contributed by volunteers.

The Council continued discussion of salaries and step increases for exempt employees, and the discussion gravitated to their job descriptions. But, because all City employee job descriptions are contained in a single ordinance, the Council agreed that all job descriptions should be reviewed as well. Mayor Shaena Peterson noted that there is no point in looking at just one position description.

The Council took notice of the research Public Works Superintendent David Pace had performed in relation to public works superintendent salaries in comparably sized communities throughout the state, and recommended that more clerical support be provided by one of the office employees.

The Council authorized payment of bills in the amount of $44,594.11. Councilor John Gettman observed that it is difficult for the review committee to determine the purpose of purchases made with a City credit card, and discussion was held on various alternatives for accounting for credit card purchases.

 The Council discussed the City’s need for a third well to satisfy an increasing population and a growing demand for water. The State Water Board had not responded to the City’s request for a third well, as well as requests to correct certain irregularities in the initial grant of water rights. David Pace noted in his written report to the Council that two pumps are needed for early morning hours, but that a single pump is sufficient to serve the demand for the remainder of the day. But, he cautioned, “We would not be able to keep up with the demand if one well (pump) develops a problem and can’t be run.”

In his report to the Council, David also commented on complaints of chlorine smell and white residue in the water. He explained that he had to switch from liquid caustic soda to powder soda ash for corrosion control. He added that soda ash was the proper chemical additive to compensate for the water’s low alkalinity.

Dave added in his report, that liquid sodium hypochlorite is injected into the water as a disinfectant. He said he would research other alternatives to deal with problems of smell. Some water customers had reported detecting a chlorine smell, but others have said they have not smelt chlorine in their water.

The Council took up Dave’s request to purchase an excavator for the City. The Council referred the matter to the Public Works Committee with instructions to invite a local contractor to attend. In discussion Council members expressed their concerns over who would operate the machine, and how would it be maintained and repaired.

Bob Miles commented from the audience, that the operator and backup should be highly skilled, and “able to frost a cake with it.”

David’s report also noted that the new Warren Street waterline is installed and working, and that the contractor is starting to pull up the old pipe.

The Council took up the matter of the Transient Room Tax. The Council set a public hearing and first reading of an ordinance governing the tax for the September 10 meeting. That would allow a second vote in October if the vote on the first reading is not unanimous. The City needs to adopt its ordinance before the November election in order to keep its share of the revenues.

David Pace reported that APEX Drilling had completed drilling the pilot hole for the Alderbrook undercrossing. The driller veered from the planned route of the undercrossing at the south end of the bridge. He stated that Tillamook County saw no problem at this time, but would require as-built plans for its records.

The Council responded to a request from John and Sharon Ostrander to adjust their water bill. Their pump had broken while they were out of town. Their water bill reflected a usage of 205,300 gallons, for a charge of $535.26. The Council agreed to charge the Ostranders their normal monthly usage fee of $36.25, plus a fee to turn the water back on.

The Council adopted Resolution 13-15, seeking a Small Cities Allotment Grant of $50,000 to repair Bewley Street, which had recently been transferred to the City by Tillamook County.

The Council approved an agreement allowing the Tillamook YMCA to use the Watt Family Park sports field for soccer and flag football games from September 11 to November 1.

The Council reappointed Terry Griffin to the Planning Commission for a four-year term, and reappointed Chris Gant to the Commission, to serve until a replacement can be found.

Firefighter Annual Picnic

The Bay City Volunteer Firefighter’s Association will host their annual BBQ-Potluck at the fire station Saturday, August 24, starting at 11 a.m. The firefighters will supply the burgers, dogs and what goes with them. So, bring your appetites and a side dish to share with your friends, and join the firefighters for their annual barbecue. It’s a great time to meet your neighbors and make new friends.

There will be a table, for those of you who are interested, to sign up for the Map Your Neighborhood program. This is a vital program that will help neighbors prepare to survive emergencies. While there is lots of talk about the massive earthquake and tsunami lurking in Bay City’s future, preparation for those events will assure our ability to survive the lesser emergencies we face every winter. And, guess what. You will get to know your neighbors a lot better.

There will also be equipment on display, lists of items for each of us to include in our “go packs,” and a raffle. I hear that a NOAA Weather Radio will be one of the items raffled off.

The Fire Department is looking for additional members. If you’d like to become a part of this great organization, just come down some Monday evening and fill out an application.

Our firefighters do a lot for this town, and I speak from experience. I always make a modest donation to support the department, and ask that you do the same. They use the donations to help support their training needs and make other purchases. The Association is working on getting 501c3 status, and it expects to have that in place by the year’s end.

Emergency Preparedness

The Emergency Preparedness Committee met Wednesday, August 9, at the fire station.

Gordon McCraw, our Emergency Management Director, announced that an improved Nixle Notification System is now available. You can pick the method of notification and select the types of emergencies you wish to be notified about. For example, a commercial fisherman would certainly want to be advised of adverse sea conditions, but the landlubber would not.

You can register by going to www.nixle.com.

Darrell Griffith, our Fire Chief, also discussed provisions for survival, advising that, “you can survive three minutes without air, three days without water, and three weeks without food.”

He advised that it is better for neighborhood groups to procure and store food supplies, rather than having the City do it. The reason, he said, is that the City, a government entity, would have to observe pull dates and rotate the stock. Privately owned food stocks are not subject to that requirement. Canned goods will be perfectly edible long after the manufacturer’s “pull date.”

Most significantly, Darrell displayed and discussed a water filter, which would provide perfectly safe dinking water without resorting to chemicals. It uses an ultra fine filter to filter out microbes and other contaminants. The filter costs about $60, but has been available for as little as $45. There will be information on this and other survival items at the Firefighter Picnic August 24.

Smoke Alarms

The State Fire Marshal Smoke Alarm Program is coming to Bay City. The Fire Marshal would like to see smoke alarms in all residences. These smoke alarms would be provided at no cost to the residents. Look for signup sheets to receive the smoke alarms at several places around town. I believe there will be signup sheets at the Firefighter Picnic.

 

Burning Restrictions

Just a reminder. All outdoor burning ceased effective August 1. No outdoor burning will be permitted until the State Fire Marshal declares it safe. Small fires are permitted in outdoor barbecue pits and fire places, provided they are monitored and completely extinguished after use.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

Dinner at Downie’s Café

Downie’s Café is open for dinner Thursday through Sunday. Dinner hours are from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sharline and I haven’t been able to have dinner there during the summer because of her fall June 4. But when you treat yourself to a dinner there, be sure to top it off with a piece of their delicious pie. You just can’t beat it.

ArtSpace

It’s been a while since I’ve talked about ArtSpace. I’ve noticed an “Open” sign outside the building for the last week or two. I’m told that ArtSpace is selling smoothies, fresh squeezed juices, and, I believe, coffee. I haven’t been down there to try it, because my summer has been consumed by doctor visits.

Also, note the new name neatly lettered on the front window.

Bay City Arts Center

Artists of the Month for August are Victoria and Anthony Stoppiello. They will be showing a collection of their watercolors entitled “Near and Far … In Some Cases, Far Out.” Their work will be exhibited August 9 through August 28.

Anthony, an architect, took up watercolor painting as a release from the precision of the pencil drawings required of people in his profession. Victoria took up watercolor painting in 1989, and both have studied with local artists in Tillamook County.

United Paws Adoptathon will take place August 17, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Arts Center. The event is open to the public. Come give a poor little kitty a good home!

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, Aug. 18. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

On August 21, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., The Arts Center will host Beach Art Camp 2 for children ages 6 to 12 years. Cost is $30, and scholarships are available. Lunch will be included. BCAC encourages pre-registration.

PUD Car Wash Fundraiser will be held Saturday, August 24, from 8 a.m. to noon.  BCAC could use your help. Bring the family. Rumor has it that there will be donuts. Contact BCAC to sign up. And, when you’re done getting your car washed, stop by the fire station for the Firefighters’ Picnic.

Open Studio: BCAC is open for artistic exploration Wednesday evenings from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your own materials and make some art!

Yoga classes are held every Monday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The cost is $5 per 75-minute session. If you are interested in yoga or have any questions, please call or e-mail BCAC. All levels are welcome.

Nancy Slavin’s Toddler Art sessions are held every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. This is a parent and child experience, and the program provides families a great time for sharing with other parents and children. There is no charge to attend, but donations are welcome to help cover the cost of utilities.

The Board of Directors meets the first Monday of each month. Everyone is welcome to attend. If you want to get on the agenda, contact Dia Norris at gnorris@oregoncoast.com.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

The Arts Center has run into difficulties with its Web site. But you can still access the Arts Center’s Facebook page. The Arts Center is continuing to work on its Web site, but if you have questions, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Newport Visual Arts Center

From Pattern to Painting: The Art of the Marbled Surface

One-of-a-kind paintings on hand-marbled surfaces by Jean Blatner, Susan Cowan, Sandy Dutko, Airi Foote, Carol Sands and Liz Walker are on display in the Runyan Gallery at the Newport Visual Arts Center from August 2 through September 30, 2013. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

These Portland area artists, who first learned to marble from fellow artist and instructor Susan Cowan, have been experimenting with paints and paper for more than five years, creating their own modern version of an artistic practice called ebru marbling that dates back to the Ottoman Empire.

Paper marbling is a method of aqueous surface design which can produce patterns similar to smooth marble or other stone. The patterns are the result of color floated on a viscous solution known as “size,” and combined with a stylus or rake before being carefully transferred to an absorbent surface such as paper or canvas. Part of its appeal is that each print is a unique monotype. Not content to marble solely on paper and canvas surfaces, these painters have also marbled baskets, wooden boxes, dried gourds and other objects, some of which are included in this exhibit.

Sponsored by the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts (OCCA), the exhibit will have a second opening on September 6, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Liz Walker will teach a water media workshop, “From Marbled Paper to Finished Painting,” on Saturday, September 7, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Walker will teach students how to glaze and layer over pre-marbled papers. Marbled papers will be provided.

The Runyan Gallery is on the first floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center.

Oregon Council for the Arts is a nonprofit arts organization and the regional arts council for Curry, Coos, Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsop Counties, and the coastal towns of Douglas and Lane Counties. OCCA brings high quality arts experiences to the Coast. The Coastal Oregon Visual Artists Showcase features mid-career artists within the arts council.

The Newport Visual Arts Center is located at 777 NW Beach Drive on the beach in the historic Nye Beach area of Newport. For further information about the Newport Visual Arts Center and the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, go to the Links page and click on the link for the Center, or call OCCA VAC Director Sally Houck at (541) 265-6569.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad

The Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad continues to offer new opportunities to enjoy our beautiful part of the Northwest.

The OCSR recently leased much of the Port of Tillamook Bay trackage which remains intact, and the railroad has been working diligently ensure the safety of the roadbed and clear it of the vegetation that has encroached since the storms of 2007.

On October 5, OCSR plans an all-day excursion from Garibaldi to Batterson and back. The trip will take seven and one-half hours and include stops at Rockaway Beach and Wheeler. The trip to Batterson will take you along the Nehalem River in early fall, when fall colors should be at their height. There will be at least three photo run-bys.

The train will be pulled by the McCloud River #25, a Prairie type, wheel arrangement 2-6-2, a historic steam locomotive that was used in the trestle scene of the movie, “Stand by Me.” The consist will include two coaches, one open car and a baggage car.

Reservations will be required, and the cost of the excursion will be $98 per person. There are only 120 seats available, so reservations should be made sooner rather than later. For further information, please call (503) 292-5055.

Bits and Pieces

I’m happy to report that Sharline is feeling lots better, and that the pacemaker appears to be doing its job. When you’re 82, you don’t heal up as quickly as you did at 22.

Several days ago, she quit using the arm splint during the day, although she still wears it when she goes to sleep.

But she continues to have difficulty getting in and out of our Ford Ranger. But, we manage.

Finally, today, Sharline and I saw our deer. The mamma was munching blackberries while watching her twins prancing about the yard. They certainly have grown since I first saw them.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be September 19 at 6 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 
     

 

 

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