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Over The Back Fence 2014

December 29, 2014

BAY CITY, December 29, 2014 -- it’s been a rough winter and a rough year. I certainly hope 2015 is better. When going through my files at year’s end, I was truly astounded at how few issues of the Grapevine I’ve published this year. I suppose all those extra doctor visits for Sharlne and me might have something to do with it. Let’s hope I can do a better job of it in 2015.

City Council
The City Council’s monthly meeting on December 9 resumed the public hearing to consider draft Ordinance 661, which would make certain revisions in the City’s public contracting policies. Primarily, the ordinance was drafted because of a change in the state law, which raises the amount of a public contract that can be awarded without formal bidding to $10,000 from $5,000.

The public hearing had been continued from the October and November meetings, when two veterans, one a Council member, voiced their strong objections to the City’s adopting a policy of not giving preference to minorities, women and veterans in awarding contracts under $50,000.

City Attorney Lois Albright explained that the preference policy was not nearly as simple to administer as the language in the Oregon Revised Statutes and the Oregon Administrative Rules might seem to suggest. Most contracts, she explained, are awarded to business organizations, not individuals. If the business happens to employ women or disabled veterans, does this make it eligible to receive preferential treatment? What criteria are used to determine whether a claimed disability is corroborated by supporting evidence?

Outgoing councilor Robert Pollock, a veteran of the Vietnam War, agreed with the attorney’s recommendation. The ordinance was adopted as revised by Lois following the November meeting.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith reported that 2014 has been the busiest year on record for emergency calls and training hours. He also reported that the fire hall now has a man door installed in the engine bays.

Jackson Morris, who recently purchased a home in Bay City, noted that he had donated some items for the basketball court, but that they had not been installed yet. He said he’d be willing to donate half the cost of installing them if the City would match.

Pat Vining, chair of the Parks Committee, reported that there were some inconsistencies involving the grant for engineering studies needed for this phase of development of Watt Family Park. He reported that Steve Donovan of HSN Engineering would revise his cost estimates for supervision to bring the costs within the amount allowed by the grant. Steve said he’d donate any services costing beyond what the grant allowed.

Councilor Robert Pollock questioned some of the items billed by the City Planner, recommending that payment for those items be withheld pending further review and justification.

Discussion was held regarding the duties of the planner and of other City contractors generally, and the need for agreement as to what was expected from them. It was noted that two contracts had expired, and that both contractors were continuing on a month-by-month basis.

Staff was directed to prepare a Request for Proposals for both expired contracts.

Further discussion of the contracts to provide water to the Juno and Latimer water associations was deferred to the January meeting. No representative of the Juno association was present at the meeting, and the Latimer association had notified the Council that the proposed agreement was “so broad in scope” that they would have to call a meeting to consider the matter.

Attorney Albright stated that the present contract to provide water to Juno and Latimer will expire January 31, 2015.

The Council again discussed properties without proper water and sewer connections. It was noted that a neighbor had been providing water and electricity to a problem residence on 18th street, which has not had a water or electric utility connection for several years. it was reported that the electricity was being supplied by an extension cord which crossed the street. Water was being brought to the home in buckets.

Attorney Albright noted that the property providing the water and electricity may be guilty of a violation.

The 18th Street property has again become a repository for junk and debris, and the Council again declared it a nuisance and directed that the nuisance be abated by January 11, 2015.

The Council set an executive session to discussion acquisition of the former P.U.D. transformer site for the January 13, 2015, meeting.

Ed Eaton had complained to the City that his street address was out of sequence. Attorney Albright recommended that the City write Eaton a letter explaining that he cannot be guaranteed emergency services if his house number is out of sequence.

The Council scheduled its Goal Setting Meeting for 5:30 p.m. January 20 at City Hall. The public is invited to attend.

The Council confirmed its support for the Salmonberry Concept Plan, which will provide a transportation corridor via the old Salmonberry rail line, which will benefit communities along the old rail line from Banks to the Oregon Coast.

The Council also directed sending a letter of support of Tillamook County Health Department Family Health Center’s application for federal grant funding assistance to provide primary health care services as a Federally Qualified Health Center.

Mayor Shaena Peterson announced a new listing service, Oregon Coast, for activities and places to stay along the Oregon Coast.

Bay City Boosters
The Bay City Boosters held their annual Christmas potluck Friday, December 19. For those wishing to participate, there was a Chinese gift exchange.

This was the last meeting for Linda Vining as Boosters president. The Boosters will next meet Friday, January 30, at noon. Dallas Pfeifer is the incoming Boosters president.

Vacancies in City Government
The Planning Commission still has one vacancy to fill.

To apply, simply fill out an application at the City office. To be eligible, you must live within the City of Bay City, or within the Urban Growth Boundary outside the City.

Outdoor Burning
As of October 2, open burning is allowed, thanks the start of the fall rains.

2015 burn permits are now available, at no charge, at the City office.

Reservations for the DAV Van
County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

 

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service
County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office
Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity
VFW Post 2848 held its annual Christmas Dinner December 18, its regular meeting night. The dinner, originally scheduled for December 11, had to be postponed because of inclement weather.

The next meeting of the post will be January 15, 2015.

Worn Flags
I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace
Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Bay City Arts Center
On December 31, come to the Arts Center to celebrate the New York New Year’s Eve Membership Party. BCAC members or prospective members may come and celebrate the New Year on East Coast time. Then you can celebrate it again on our own time.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, January 17. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

BCAC is getting its Toddler Art program back up and running. Contact Leeauna at the BCAC office, (503) 377-9620, for more details.

Musicians also wanted! BCAC wishes to start a community symphony orchestra, and is seeking interested and experienced musicians to learn and perform intermediate level music. If you are interested, contact the BCAC office.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Bits and Pieces
It’s been a rough year for both of us. As I said last month, our doctor visits have increased virtually exponentially. Both of us are now 83 and not loving it. As G.B. Shaw once said, it’s a damned shame that youth is wasted on the young.

I would add that aging is definitely not for the faint of heart.

And when you’re running back and forth to this doctor or that, it’s difficult to schedule your other activities. I guess the part I hate the worst is driving over that mountain frequently to see doctors in the Valley or Portland. That goes double for driving over that mountain during the winter.

But there is one consolation. Our deer have reappeared, following an absence of several weeks. I guess they make the rounds, never staying in one place for too long.

Sharline and I bid a very fond farewell to our former neighbor, Bobbi Berg. We noticed that Bobbi had been picking up her beautiful potted plants around her back door, and the place is now pretty barren.

I suppose the sudden disappearance of the For Sale signs should have given us a clue. We’ve seen some activity around the place, but the cars are all strange.

The other day, as we were returning from yet another doctor visit, we encountered Bobbi in the parking lot of the Bay City post office. She has finally sold her property to a retired Navy guy and his wife. We chatted for a while, and made plans to get into Tillamook for a visit after the holidays.

And I’ve just got to meet my new neighbor. We ancient mariners must stick together. I’m told he is a charter fisherman.

And before I forget it, let me wish all of you a happy and prosperous New Year. May it be much, much better than the one just ending!

 

 

November 24, 2014

BAY CITY, November 24, 2014 --- I’m late again, but at least I’m getting out two issues of the Back Fence this month. October was a completely lost cause. Let’s hope we can get things back on track after all this holiday madness is over.

City Council
The City Council’s regular monthly meeting on November 12 resumed the public hearing to consider draft Ordinance 661, which would make certain revisions in the City’s public contracting policies. Primarily, the ordinance was drafted because of a change in the state law, which raises the amount of a public contract that can be awarded without first obtaining competitive quotes or going out to bid, to $10,000 from $5,000.

The public hearing had been continued from the October meeting, when two veterans, one a Council member, voiced their strong objections to the City’s adopting a policy of not giving preference to minorities, women and veterans in awarding contracts under $50,000.

City Attorney Lois Albright explained that the preference policy was not as simple to administer as it might appear on the surface. Most contracts, she explained, are awarded to business organizations. If the business employs women or disabled veterans, does that make it eligible to receive preferential treatment? What criteria are used to determine whether a claimed disability is corroborated by supporting evidence?

Lois also pointed out that a decision to grant preference could open the City to a potential lawsuit. When a Council member commented that the lawyer could certainly make things complicated, she responded that, “That’s what lawyers do --- they find all the potential problems.”

The Council continued deliberation on the matter to its next regular meeting.

Most of the meeting was devoted to discussing and refining the contracts for the Latimer and Juno water associations. With several matters remaining to be resolved, Lois recommended that the Council take no action on the proposed contracts until each water association could present them to their governing boards. The matter was continued to the December meeting.

The Council resumed discussion of properties without proper water and sewer connections. Councilor John Gettman suggested contracting with the Sheriff’s Office to do the City’s code enforcement. The Council felt, generally, that would cause a budgetary problem. City Recorder Linda Downey said most people facing foreclosure still owe the City money when they leave the property, noting that the City needs to lien the property.

The Council voiced their approval of a letter Attorney Albright sent to Robert White at Tillamook P.U.D. regarding its decommissioned P.U.D. substation property. The consensus of the Council is obtain the property to provide Public Works a direct access to the shop and treatment plant, and to serve as an alternate access route for emergency equipment.

The Council took no action on a resident’s verbal request to adjust the City’s street numbering policy.

Attorney Albright discussed the City’s Community Action Loan program, noting that some changes might be needed to assure that the City has a valid security interest in real properties involved.

Bay City Boosters
The Bay City Boosters met at noon Friday, November 21. The meeting was held one week early in view of the Thanksgiving holiday.

Many members brought canned goods for the Food Bank, and gifts for the Bay City United Methodist Church’s Christmas Shoppe. The Christmas Shoppe enables people of limited means to purchase Christmas gifts for their children at nominal cost.

The Boosters heard a presentation by a representative of the Helping Hand program, which addresses the problem of homelessness. They are attempting to raise $50,000 by next spring. The Boosters contributed $100 to the program.

Jim Allenbrand, VFW Post 2848 commander. Reported on the Veterans Day program held at the High School Nov. 11. There have been many comments on the great program this year, many people noting that it was the “best program ever.”

The Boosters will hold their Christmas party at noon Friday, December 19. For those wishing to participate, there will be a Chinese gift exchange.

Vacancies in City Government
The Planning Commission still has one vacancy to fill.

To apply, simply fill out an application at the City office. To be eligible, you must live within the City of Bay City, or within the Urban Growth Boundary outside the City.

Outdoor Burning
As of October 2, open burning is allowed, thanks the start of the fall rains.

2014 burning permits are required for outdoor burning. 2015 permits are not yet available.

The Fire Department recommends that you look carefully at your property, especially the property around your houses, and clear away any easily-burning fuel you find. If we have a wildfire here in Bay City, an event that is highly possible, there are many properties where dry brush or grass is dangerously close to dwellings.

And, while you’re at it, check your smoke alarms. (All I have to do to test mine is to toast a couple of slices of bread. That thing makes enough racket to wake the dead.) It is customary to do that when you set your clocks back for Standard Time.

Reservations for the DAV Van
County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service
County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office
Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

 

VFW Activity
Bay City VFW Post 2848 hosted its annual Veterans Day celebration at the Don Whitney Auditorium this year. The show could not be held at the Air Museum as it had in years past, because of the movement of the Erickson airplanes to the new location in Madras.

Burt Darnielle brought his Traveling Military Museum, which he displayed in the main hallway by the auditorium. He considered the location and lighting to be superb.

This year’s program honored Women in Uniform. The two keynote speakers were Bernice Stephenson, a WWII Army Air Corps veteran, and Jaynie Cole, who received a Purple Heart in Iraq. Each speaker received a bouquet of flowers, and every lady veteran in the audience received a rose. That includes Bay City Mayor Shaena Peterson.

The Buffalo Kitty band put on a great performance during the show, as well as an encore following the end of the program.

The High School provided outstanding support, and the Post thanks Rachelle Metcalfe and Croix Carlson-Swanson , especially, for their work arranging the staging and operating the sound system for the program.

A bus brought 21 women veterans from Astoria for the event. The Post also thanks the Tillamook Transportation Department for its help in bringing veterans to the program free of charge. They reported that Dial-a-Ride brought 42 veterans to the Veterans Day program, and 26 others rode the buses free of charge. They also transported tables from the Fairgrounds and back. The Tables were used to display the Traveling Military Museum.

There were many comments following the show that it was the “best ever.”

The Post thanks all who worked to make the program a success, and the businesses which donated money to help defray the cost of presenting the program.

Worn Flags
I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace
Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Fresh has discontinued its Wednesday evening dinners for the summer, but look for them to resume in the fall.

The Christmas Shoppe
The congregation of the Bay City United Methodist Church announced recently that it is preparing for its eighteenth annual Christmas Shoppe. The Shoppe will be held December 5 this year. This is an opportunity for our local community to share the gift of caring with families in Tillamook County who are suffering financially.

Last year the community’s donations helped 75 families. Since the inception of the Christmas Shoppe, the church has served more than 500 families. Communities can help with this effort by donating new gift items for all family age groups. No prices are marked on the gift items. Through local schools and social service organizations, families are invited to come to the Shoppe to shop for Christmas gifts. Shoppers may select the gifts they need and pay what they are able --- if anything.

Anyone interested in donating gift items may bring them to the City Hall in Bay City starting Wednesday, December 3, from noon to 4 p.m., and Thursday, December 4 from 8 a.m. to noon.

If anyone needs to make other delivery arrangements, please contact Roberta Bettis at (503) 812-3213. Financial donations may be made to the Bay City United Methodist Church (note on your check that the donation is for the Christmas Shoppe). Checks should be mailed to the church at Bay City UMC, P.O. Box 3135, Bay City, OR 97107.

Volunteers who wish to help with the Shoppe should contact Roberta Bettis at the number above, or at the church at (503) 377-2679.

Bay City Arts Center
Elissha and Mark Sievers are the November artists of the month. Their presentation features a variety of 3-D items and designs, with a “Day of the Dead” celebration theme.

On Dec. 6, the Tillamook Farmers’ Market will host the first annual Winter Market at BCAC. The event will be held from noon to 6 p.m. and will include food, shopping, a raffle and more. Admission to the event is free. Proceeds will help support the Tillamook Farmers’ Market. BCAC is looking for more vendors. Table space for vendors is $20 per table. Contact Lauren Sorg if you are interested. My source does not list a correct Web address, so you will have to obtain that from the Arts Center, (503) 377-9620.

On December 7, BCAC hosts its annual dinner and silent auction. Mark your calendar for an evening of family fun. Proceeds from the event will go to support the arts throughout Tillamook County.  Stay tuned for more info.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, December 21. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

On December 31, come to the Arts Center to celebrate the New York New Year’s Eve Membership Party. BCAC members or prospective members may come and celebrate the New Year on East Coast time. Then you can celebrate it again on our own time.

As your are aware, the Pillars Party was canceled. But BCAC still needs to repair its pillars, and is conducting a Pennies for Pillars campaign. You can donate on line. Sadly, I don’t have the space in my Back Fence to print out the entire Web address for the Pillars project, so I would suggest you contact the Arts Center for instructions for making on-line contributions.

BCAC is getting its Toddler Art program back up and running. Contact Leeauna at the BCAC office, (503) 377-9620, for more details.

Musicians also wanted! BCAC wishes to start a community symphony orchestra, and is seeking interested and experienced musicians to learn and perform intermediate level music. If you are interested, contact the BCAC office.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Bits and Pieces
November, like October, has been difficult for both of us. I note with no small amount of sadness that our doctor visits seem to be increasing exponentially.

And now we have to look forward to the so-called holidays. We both find them more stressful with each passing year. So, Bah Humbug!

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. But December will be an exception.

On December 11, starting at 6 p.m. the Post and Auxiliary will hold their annual Christmas Party at the Ad Montgomery Community Hall. For those who wish to participate, there will be a Chinese gift exchange. These are always lots of fun.

The next regular meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be Thursday, January 15, 6 p.m., at the Ad Montgomery Community Hall.

 

November 4, 2014

BAY CITY, November 4, 2014 --- it’s been a while. I had intended to publish a Grapevine before now, but, as they say, the road to hell is paved with good intentions. October was not a good month for me, and the Grapevine just wasn’t a hot enough brush fire to compete with all the other things going on.

Post Office
Steve is settling in very nicely, and now the last step in getting the post office up and running is completed. We can now deposit mail inside the post office, but you still have to use the outside mailbox after 10 a.m. Saturdays.

City Council
This was an interesting month for our City Council. In addition to its regular monthly meeting Oct. 14, the Council held a special meeting just two weeks later, on Oct. 28.

Probably the most significant item to report is that the Council adopted Ordinance 662, which levies a tax of 10 percent on recreational marijuana sold within the City of Bay City. The ordinance permits the merchant or entity selling the marijuana to retain five percent of the tax collected to cover expenses of keeping the necessary records.

The ordinance contains an emergency clause, making it effective upon passage.

The Planning Commission has been tasked to recommend zoning restrictions to determine where recreational marijuana may be sold within the City.

City Attorney Lois Albright, who had been in the Midwest for the passing of her mother, told the Council about her visit to Colorado, where voters passed a measure to allow sales of recreational marijuana.

She asked for directions to the marijuana dispensary, and was directed to the Medical Plaza. The first place she entered was a dispensary for medical marijuana. Inquiring as to the location of the recreational marijuana dispensary, she was directed next door.

Upon entering, she was asked for her ID and then directed to a seat to wait her turn. She was provided with a “menu” of the day’s offerings, including specials for the day. The list was lengthy and contained some very interesting names.

She said that the Bud Tender came out and took several customers to the back room. She waited about 20 minutes before her turn came. Inside, she took some pictures of the operation, being careful not to show any people.

There were display cases for the standard kinds of bud, as well as cases displaying the edible products.

Mayor Shaena Peterson noted that the Planning Commission should be looking at proposed zoning restrictions and forwarding recommendations to the Council. A major requirement would be the availability of lots of parking.

Councilor Kathy Baker reported on the League of Oregon Cities workshop she attended in Beaverton. They presented maps with circles showing where dispensaries could be located, and named the types of businesses which could not be located near marijuana dispensaries.

The Council, at its regular meeting of October 14, considered proposed Ordinance 661, which would define City policy on letting public contracts.

The primary effect of the proposed ordinance would be the lifting of the limit which would allow the City to let contracts without bidding to $10,000 from the present $5,000.

The proposed ordinance would require that the City incorporate new rules for Certification of Independent Contractor status into personal service contracts as they come up for renewal.

Perhaps the most controversial proposal would affect disabled veterans seeking to bid on contracts with the City.

Attorney Albright pointed out in her cover letter that, “state law allows, but does not require, the City to give preference to minorities, women and disabled veterans in contracts under $50,000.” The draft ordinance would not give preference to anyone in these groups because, Albright said in her cover letter, “… we would need to adopt a bunch of regulations to confirm their status and give them preference. I think it really opens the City up to liability if in the event you don’t choose to issue a contract to one of the people in these categories.”

Counselor John Gettman, a veteran, sent the attorney information regarding Oregon’s rules requiring veterans’ preference.

John Sollman, also a veteran, voiced his objection to denying disabled veterans preference in contracting with the City.

The Council set the matter over to the November meeting, which will take place November 12, the day following Veterans Day.

Cary Clifton rose to urge the City to adopt a tax on recreational marijuana. Shaena advised that the City would consider the ordinance at a special meeting on October 28.

In other business, the Council agreed to call on the Tillamook County Health Department to determine whether the house on 18th Street is unsanitary because it has not had water or other utilities for several years.

Steve Donovan advised the Council that the upper Kilchis and Alderbrook crossings of the Kilchis River had been completed. As-built drawings have been prepared and final contract payments have been approved.

Shaena reported that Bob White of P.U.D. advised her that he would be prepared to “go to bat” for the City with Tillamook P.U.D. regarding purchasing or acquiring an easement through the former transformer site to provide staff better access to Public Works facilities.

City Recorder Linda Downey advised that she had spoken with City Engineer regarding an environmental site assessment of the P.U.D. property, and with Michael DiBlasi of the Department of State Lands regarding the stream crossing to access Public Works property. DiBlasi advised that permits would cost between $300 and $700, and the application and review process would take approximately 120 days.

The City granted its assent to issuance of a new liquor license to the Center Market, based on change of ownership. Councilor Gettman cast the sole “no” vote.

Dangerous behavior and threats against City employees were discussed. Fire Chief Darrell Griffith suggested drafting an employee policy regarding their actions and recourse when faced with threats or other dangerous behavior.

Darrell also said he should not be the chair of the Emergency Preparedness Committee, but should serve as a member of the Committee. Shaena asked Councilor Killion to bring her recommendations to the next meeting.

Steve Donovan requested that HSN Engineering be involved in planning for Watt Park.

The October 14 meeting adjourned in a record one hour and four minutes. Someone commented that it was probably because the lawyer wasn’t present.

Bay City Boosters
The Bay City Boosters met at noon Friday, October 31. Linda Vining was ill, and the meeting was chaired by a “committee.”

There were no minutes available, so the members told the “committee” their recollections of business transacted at the September meeting.

It was agreed that the November meeting be held November 21, owing to the Thanksgiving holiday the following Thursday. It was also agreed that members bring their standard fare for the potluck, rather than holiday foods. It doesn’t pay to get sick of turkey and stuffing before the big day.

The members also unanimously elected Dallas Pfeiffer president. His term starts in January.

Vacancies in City Government
The Planning Commission still has one vacancy to fill.

To apply, simply fill out an application at the City office. To be eligible, you must live within the City of Bay City, or within the Urban Growth Boundary outside the City.

 

Outdoor Burning
As of October 2, open burning is allowed, thanks the start of the fall rains.

2014 burning permits are required for outdoor burning. 2015 permits are not yet available.

The Fire Department recommends that you look carefully at your property, especially the property around your houses, and clear away any easily-burning fuel you find. If we have a wildfire here in Bay City, an event that is highly possible, there are many properties where dry brush or grass is dangerously close to dwellings.

And, while you’re at it, check your smoke alarms. (All I have to do to test mine is to toast a couple of slices of bread. That thing makes enough racket to wake the dead.) It is customary to do that when you set your clocks back for Standard Time.

Reservations for the DAV Van
County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service
County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office
Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity
Our plans for our Veterans Day celebration are kicking into high gear. Our planning committee conducted a site visit at the high school recently, and we have confirmed that Burt Darnielle will be there with his Traveling Military Museum. The High School Auditorium is a beautiful place, with truly excellent acoustics.

As a service to our local veterans, the Tillamook Transportation Department will allow veterans to ride free of charge within Tillamook on Veterans Day. They will also provide free Dial-a-Ride transportation for veterans in the greater Tillamook area who wish to attend the Veterans Day ceremony at the High School.

We will, of course, miss holding our event at the Air Museum, which is now located in Madras. The members of our post have been wondering about the possibility of keeping a museum at the Blimp Hangar, but making it more of a military museum, with all sorts of military equipment on display. Wouldn’t that be a great thing for Tillamook!

Worn Flags
I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace
Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Fresh has discontinued its Wednesday evening dinners for the summer, but look for them to resume in the fall.

Bay City Arts Center
Elissha and Mark Sievers are the November artists of the month. Their presentation features a variety of 3-D items and designs, with a “Day of the Dead” celebration theme.

BCAC also celebrated Marie Antoinette’s birthday November 1 with the music of Fred Bassett & Sonya Kazen, Jane Dunkin and Joe Wrabek and the Ocean Bottom Country Blues. Marie celebrates her 259th birthday this year. Anyone for cake?

On November 22 BCAC will host a “Dinner Around the World,” an evening with local and exchange students visiting from around the world. The event will feature foods and presentations by the students. Dinner starts at 5:30 p.m., with presentations starting at 6:30 p.m. Admission for adults is $15, $10 for youth.

On December 7, BCAC hosts its annual dinner and silent auction. Mark your calendar for an evening of family fun. Stay tuned for more info.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, November 16. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

As your are aware, the Pillars Party was canceled. But BCAC still needs to repair its pillars, and is conducting a Pennies for Pillars campaign. You can donate on line. Sadly, I don’t have the space in my Back Fence to print out the entire Web address for the Pillars project, so I would suggest you contact the Arts Center for instructions for making on-line contributions.

BCAC is seeking another Toddler Art teacher. If you are interested, contact Leeauna at the BCAC office, (503) 377-9620.

Musicians also wanted! BCAC wishes to start a community symphony orchestra, and is seeking interested and experienced musicians to learn and perform intermediate level music. If you are interested, contact the BCAC office.

On December 6, the Tillamook Farmers Market will host a Winter Market at the Bay City Arts Center. The event takes place from noon to 6 p.m. at the Arts Center. Enjoy shopping for a variety of arts and crafts, plus some produce as well. Pizza, beer and wine will be available, as well as non-alcoholic beverages. And, there will be a raffle.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Bits and Pieces
October has been another very rough month --- for both of us.

I have taken a couple more spills, but none as dramatic and bloody as my September tumble.

Both Sharline and I have been experiencing a number of medical problems, which require visits to doctors. It seems that doctor visits increase exponentially as one gets older. That will, at least, explain my failure to publish a new Grapevine in October. It’s just been one thing after another.

My daughters have been urging me to use a cane when I go out, but I feel like a wimp doing that. But, I suppose I should yield to reason and start using the silly thing. My balance function sucks!

At least the deer still like our yard. We have seen as many as six or seven of them here in the mornings.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be Thursday, November 20, 6 p.m., at the Ad Montgomery Community Hall. And don’t forget to attend our gala Vets Day celebration at the Don Whitney Auditorium at Tillamook High School. Doors open at 10 a.m., and the show starts at 11.

 

September 26, 2014

BAY CITY, September 26, 2014 --- Looks like summer has ended, and fall is here. It’s amazing that the first full day of fall should feature a sudden shift to fall rains. I’m certainly glad for the rain, however, because it will help control the wildfires.

Post Office

Happy days are here again! The Bay City Post Office is open for business, same hours as before. Judy died about Sept. 3, 2013; the window has been closed slightly more than a year.

Our new contract postmaster is Steve Reeves, a Vietnam veteran, I believe. Let’s welcome him and make him feel at home.

Seeing that post office window open once more is a most welcome sight.

Welcome aboard, Steve!

City Council

The City Council held its regular meeting Tuesday, Sept. 9.

The issue of residences without City services continues challenge the Council. The City, several months ago, had written to the Board of County Commissioners asking for some help enforcing its requirement that occupied residences be connected to sewer and water.

The County presented the City with a draft response, to be discussed during the next meeting of the Board of County Commissioners. In the draft letter, the BOC proposed to inform the City that County ordinances “do not apply within the confines of an incorporated city unless the city consents to such jurisdiction.”

The draft letter went on to say that the “County Health Officer might assist the City to form a determination on whether the structure ‘is in a filthy or unsanitary condition especially liable to cause the spread of contagious or infectious disease.’ ”

The draft response added that if such a determination was reached, “the council could proceed under your ordinance to conduct a hearing on the issue.”

The Council engaged in an extended discussion of the proposed revised contracts for the Juno and Latimer water association. The proposed new contracts will limit the City’s responsibilities to reading meters bi-monthly and billing; receiving, depositing and accounting for association funds; maintenance and replacement of water meters and lids; testing of meters; and shutting off lines or valves in the event of a needed waterline repair or break. The associations would assume greater responsibility for maintenance and repair of their respective systems.

The Council agreed to certain amendments regarding surcharges to correct previous accounting errors. The contracts for Latimer and Juno water associations should be ready for adoption at the October meeting.

A question was raised regarding use of the street maintenance fee to maintain gravel streets. Mayor Shaena Peterson advised that the street maintenance funds could be used only for paved streets. This issue has been a bone of contention since the street fee resolution was adopted, because those living on gravel streets often claim that they are paying for services for which they receive no benefit.

Bob Miles advised the Council that the surfaced streets are in “great shape,” and that funds will build up as more paved streets are improved.

The Council adopted a motion offered by Kari Fleisher, that the Streets Committee convene and prepare recommendations for use of the Street Maintenance Fee for gravel roads.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith, responding to an earlier request of the mayor, stated that he would be unable to conduct a drill in October, owing to the need to design a drill for City office and staff.

The matter of obtaining an access easement over P.U.D. property, namely the former location of a transformer station, remains unresolved. The easement would give Public Works employees access to the shop and treatment plant without adding to the traffic through the Goose Point area. The easement would also provide an emergency access and egress point for Goose Point.

Councilor Robert Pollock urged that the Council pursue the matter. Mayor Peterson asked staff to research the matter to see what it would take to have an additional crossing over the railroad tracks. It was also pointed out during the discussion that there may be contamination of the soil from the old transformers.

The Council again took up the matter of encroachment into public rights-of-way. Robin Weber asked whether the Council would discuss Joanne Schaeffer, expressing his frustration with the matter. Weber and Wendy Schink have been maintaining the portion of the 8th Street right-of-way which abuts their property, including construction of a raised garden bed and planting of some shrubs.

Mayor Peterson said the City would address such matters on a case-by-case basis, adding that the 8th Street complaint is primarily a neighbor v. neighbor matter. Virginia Bartholet stated that the place is beautiful, and “better than blackberries.” Bob Miles said he had walked through the area, and asked where it was that he was not supposed to go.

Fire Chief Griffith discussed a memorandum he had sent to the Council, asking for clarification of his status within the City. Previous fire chiefs, he said, had been volunteers who received a modest stipend. He noted that the City has regarded him as a part-time City employee. The dilemma, Darrell said, is knowing when is he acting as an employee and when he is working as a volunteer. He pointed to several instances in the procurement of the new fire truck where he performed functions normally performed by the City office staff.

Mayor Peterson thanked Darrell for his memorandum, and said she planned to hold a goal-setting sesion in January when these kinds of issues would be addressed.

Mayor Peterson announced a planning session sponsored by Adventist Health, to update its strategic health plan for Tillamook County. The session will be held at Friends Camp from 6 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. October 16, 2014. A dinner will be served.

Bay City Boosters

The Bay City Boosters began their new season at noon Friday, Sept. 26. The Boosters voted to contribute $100 to the Bay City Arts Center to help with the repair of their failing pillars, and to donate another $100 to VFW Post 2848 to help defray the added expense of doing this year’s Veterans Day program at the High School auditorium.

Most of the meeting was devoted to the Pearl Festival held during the Labor Day weekend. Much went well, it was agreed, but there were a few items that could be improved.

The parade assembled at 9 a.m. for an event that began at 11 a.m.

The vendors’ booths for the City Hall area were a “disaster,” and some of the vendors ended up setting up at the Arts Center. It was suggested that, next year, the booths be set up in the tennis court, to be near the music. The area is sheltered from the wind, unlike other outdoor locations around town.

One member suggested an event based on a historical motif, since Bay City had a very colorful past.

Vacancies in City Government

The Planning Commission has gained a member and lost a member. Morgan Christenson joined us in July. She filled a vacancy created by the resignation of Chris Gant. So, the net result is one vacancy remaining to be filled.

To apply, simply fill out an application at the City office. To be eligible, you must live within the City of Bay City, or within the Urban Growth Boundary outside the City.

Outdoor Burning

As of September 24, barrel burning is allowed. There is no open burning yet, but it is sure to come in the next few weeks, thanks the start of the fall rains.

The Fire Department recommends that you look carefully at your property, especially the property around your houses, and clear away any easily-burning fuel you find. If we have a wildfire here in Bay City, an event that is highly possible, there are many properties where dry brush or grass is dangerously close to dwellings.

And, while you’re at it, check your smoke alarms. (All I have to do to test mine is to toast a couple of slices of bread. That thing makes enough racket to wake the dead.)

You can still have small camp cooking fires in properly designed fireplaces or fire pits if you are camping, but be sure to check the regulations at your campground.

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity

Our plans for our Veterans Day celebration are kicking into high gear. Our planning committee conducted a site visit at the high school recently, and we have confirmed that Burt Darnielle will be there with his Traveling Military Museum. The High School Auditorium is a beautiful place, with truly excellent acoustics.

We will, of course, miss holding our event at the Air Museum, which is now located in Madras. The members of our post have been wondering about the possibility of keeping a museum at the Blimp Hangar, but making it more of a military museum, with all sorts of military equipment on display. Wouldn’t that be a great thing for Tillamook!

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

 

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace

Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Fresh has discontinued its Wednesday evening dinners for the summer, but look for them to resume in the fall.

Bay City Arts Center

The September Artist of the Month was the Trask River High School. The Arts Center is featuring a collaboration of their art throughout the month. The art work will be available for purchase.

September 27 will feature a tribute to Hank Williams performed by local musicians. The event begins at 7 p.m., and follows a Jambalaya Dinner at 6 p.m. Cost is $10 per person.

October Artist of the Month will be Eric Sappington. His reception will be held October 3, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Eric’s presentation is called “Wooden Raindrops,” featuring a variety of three-dimensional paintings, with an outdoors and weather theme. The event is free, and light refreshments will be served.

On October 4, BCAC welcomes “Primal Males,” an eclectic chamber jazz duo for a live performance. A donation dinner will be held at 5:30 p.m., and the show, costing $5, begins at 6 p.m.

On October 4 and 5, BCAC will host Discovery in Stone, an open house workshop. Course hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days, and participation is by donation. Participants should bring a sack lunch.

On October 18, BCAC is sponsoring its “Pillar Party.” The pillars on the east side of the building are in need of repairs. As a fundraiser, BCAC will host a Bollywood theme party with creative food and decorations. BCAC encourages all to dress in their East Indian attire. The evening starts at 5 p.m., and the cost is $25 for adults and $10 for youngsters, if paid in advance. If paid at the door, cost will be $30 for adults and $15 for children. Tickets may be obtained through Indiogo Pennies for Pillars, Tillamook County Pioneer Museum, Wild Flower Thrift Store, and the BCAC office.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, October 19. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

The Arts Center is conducting weekly drop-in yoga classes on Monday and Thursday evenings at 6 p.m. Cost is $5 per class.

On December 6, the Tillamook Farmers Market will host a Winter Market at the Bay City Arts Center. The event takes place from noon to 6 p.m. at the Arts Center. Enjoy shopping for a variety of arts and crafts, plus some produce as well. Pizza, beer and wine will be available, as well as non-alcoholic beverages. And, there will be a raffle.

Starving artists may obtain cheap paint at CARTM in Manzanita, Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore in Bay City, and Tillamook County Public Works in Tillamook. This is recycled latex paint available in nine colors. Cost is $24 for a 3.5 gallon bucket. The paint is a mix of indoor/outdoor, and is suitable for both. If you’re thinking of a mural, this is enough to cover a 700 to a possible 1,000 square foot area.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

BCAC is seeking another Toddler Art teacher. If you are interested, contact Leeauna at the BCAC office, (503) 377-9620.

Musicians also wanted! BCAC wishes to start a community symphony orchestra, and is seeking interested and experienced musicians to learn and perform intermediate level music. If you are interested, contact the BCAC office.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad

The Oregon Coast Crawler returns to the rails in 2014. RailsNW and the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad will take you on a memorable 10-hour journey through beautiful Oregon scenery on tracks that have not seen service since the great storm of 2007.

In fact, these tracks have not seen steam service for many more years. The train will be pulled by the McCloud River Railroad #25, an Alco 2-6-2 steam locomotive which was featured in the movie, “Stand by Me.”

The consist will include an open car for unparalleled views of the beautiful autumn color. All passengers will also have seating in an enclosed coach. The Crawler will make the round trip from Garibaldi to Salmonberry. The crew has spent many hours repairing storm damage to the tracks beyond Wheeler, so you will be able to enjoy scenery which, up to now, has been available only to bikers and hikers.

The Crawler will depart Garibaldi at 9 a.m., October 4, and arrives at Salmonberry at 1:15 p.m. The train returns to Garibaldi at 7 p.m. There will be at least three photo runbys, and more will be added as time permits. A box lunch will be served.

There is a limit of 120 passengers, so it is recommended that reservations be made as soon as possible. Cost of the excursion is $120 per person. No children under age 5 will be permitted. Advance purchase of tickets will be required. There will be no walkups.

For those who would like a shorter excursion, special arrangements can be made.

You may book by phone by calling RailsNW at (503) 292-5055 or by visiting the Web site at www.railsnw.com.

Newport Visual Arts Center

The Runyan Gallery will feature the works of Ashland artist Ryan Burns from October 3 through November 30. Gallery hours are from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday.

Burns’ exhibit, titled “Tree Studies,” includes large-scale tree rubbings on collage. A gallery reception will be held October 3, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Visual Arts Center, 777 NW Beach Drive.

Burns is represented by the Augen Gallery in Portland, Oregon, and has received numerous arts awards and residencies. He received his art education at the Herron School of Art in Indianapolis, Indiana. He has exhibited his work in solo and group shows nationwide.

The Oregon Coast Visual Arts Showcase will feature new works by Astoria artist Kathleen Paino through November 1. Her exhibit is titled, “The Journey is the Reward.” Gallery reception is scheduled for October 3, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The artist will discuss her work at 5:15 p.m.

Her exhibit includes collage, mixed media and painting. She grew up on the Oregon Coast and now lives in Astoria. She holds an undergraduate degree in art education and graduate degrees in curriculum and instruction/community education. She studied at Portland State University, Oregon State University and the University of Oregon. She retired as Dean of Continuing Education from Clatsop Community College in Astoria in 2005.

The Coastal Oregon Visual Arts Showcase is open noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

The Oregon Coast Council for the Arts is pleased to present new works by Portland artist Amy Ruppel in the Upstairs Gallery October 3 through November 29, at the Newport Visual Arts Center.

Ruppel’s exhibit, “Seaworthy,” includes paintings, illustrations and prints. There will be a reception for her October 3, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Ruppel describes herself as “an observer who reinterprets what I see through painting.” She was born and raised in Wisconsin. Colors and shapes derived by nature have always intrigued her. This show, she explains, is a throwback to classical painting in the drybrush technique, using acrylic paint and many layers of underpainting.

Her clients have included the Seattle Children’s Hospital, Blik!, Clif Bar, Aladdin, Ace Hotel-Portland, Nike, Converse, Burton Snowboards, Gnu Snowboards, Target, Kid Robot, Logitech, Whole Foods, Vermont Cheese Council, The Mercy Corps, Friends of Trees and Travel Portland.

The Upstairs Gallery is open noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday trough Saturday.

For more information on any of the exhibits, please call (541) 265-6569.

Bits and Pieces

September has been a very rough month --- for both of us.

On September 10, I caught my foot on something and went down like a pole-axed steer. On my way to the floor, I managed to hit my head on the corner of a table. Happily, the edges were beveled and rounded. Even so, I managed to lacerate my scalp, and there was blood all over the place.

My neighbor drove me to the Urgent Care clinic and they cleaned me up and sent me to the hospital for a CT scan of my head. Luckily, it showed no fractures or brain bleeds. I’ve always been known as a hard-headed SOB.

Exactly one week later, Sharline was bending over to give our dog a treat, and the dog moved. She leaned farther forward, only to realize she had passed her tipping point. Down she went. Our fire department was right up, followed by an ambulance. When the first attempt was made to get Sharline up, she complained of pain in the right hip, so it was in to the emergency room by ambulance. X-rays of the hip showed no sign of fracture, so Sharline was allowed to walk around to be doubly sure she was OK.

Three hours after arriving at the ER, we were headed home.

I guess we both lucked out this time, but I suppose we’d both better be a little more careful, and use a cane or walker, as appropriate. I hate getting old!

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be Thursday, October 16, 6 p.m., at the Ad Montgomery Community Hall.

 

September 5, 2014

BAY CITY, September 5, 2014 --- Summer is over and school is in session, so be watchful for young children waiting curbside for the school bus. The first several weeks are especially critical, because there will be lots of little kids going to school for the first time, and you never know when one will dart out into traffic. Slow down, give them a wide berth, and be careful. We have lots of kids, but none to spare!

City Council
The City Council held a special meeting Monday, Aug. 25, to take care of some urgent business and tend to a few housekeeping items.

The Council adopted Ordinance 659, which extends the City’s moratorium on siting medical marijuana facilities until May 1, 2015. The City was facing a deadline to extend the previously-adopted six-month moratorium.

As a housekeeping measure, the Council adopted Ordinance 660, which repeals Ordinances 599 and 606. These were ordinances granting Charter franchises in prior years, which were not repealed upon granting of replacement franchises. The City grants franchises allowing electric, telephone and cable utilities to use public rights-of-way for their wires and associated equipment.

The Council also adopted two resolutions supporting acquisitions of equipment by the Fire Department. Resolution 14-08 exempts purchase of a thermal camera from competitive bidding requirements. The camera, to be mounted on the new fire truck, will cost less than $5,000.

Resolution 14-09 authorizes financing of the new fire truck, to be delivered in October, for $218,070 at two percent interest, payments to be $24,257 annually. The loan will be obtained through TLC Federal Credit Union. This option, Fire Chief Darrell Griffith reported, is less costly than lease-purchase options. To qualify, the City must open a share account with TLC.

The Council then held an informal discussion of the Town Hall Workshop scheduled for September 3.

Right-of-Way Workshop
Approximately 80 people signed in for the City’s workshop on public rights-of-way held September 3.

Mayor Shaena Peterson opened the workshop by sharing a letter from City Attorney Lois Albright to the Headlight-Herald, responding to letters to the editor from Robin Weber and Wendy Schink about the City’s policy and intentions regarding use of undeveloped rights-of-way.

Albright noted in her letter, that “Schink and Weber have extended their lawn into the public right-of-way with landscaping essentially closing this portion of the public right-of-way to the citizens of Bay City.” Albright also noted that the “issue has taken hours of City Council and Planning Commission time over the past several years.”

Shaena pointed out other instances of unauthorized uses of public rights-of-way. A Slip ‘n Slide ended in a small pond on a public right-of-way, Pacific Avenue.

The City’s insurance carrier warned the City that the City would be liable should someone get hurt. The property owners were required to remove the Slip ‘n Slide.

Shaena also said that the lawn and raised bed on the undeveloped 8th Street right-of-way was essentially a neighbor-on-neighbor dispute. At the June meeting of the City Council, the Council voted to have Attorney Albright draft an ordinance governing use of public rights-of-way.

The draft ordinance was presented to the August meeting of the City Council. Further Council discussion ended with an apparent consensus that the draft ordinance would be pursued no further, but Shaena said she would proceed with the September 3 workshop to hear what the people had to say.

From many comments at the workshop, it appeared that it was not clear that the City intended to pursue the draft ordinance no further. There were several questions about “closing” undeveloped public rights-of-way.

Shaena explained that when a public right-of-way appeared to be someone’s yard, the public would hesitate to walk through it. This had been commented upon by Attorney Albright on several occasions.

Robin Weber expressed his frustration, that Shaena had once suggested that people try to make the right-of-way look nice, while the attorney says it’s not allowed. Weber commented on the cost to the City of dealing with the matter for several years, and stated that the City’s intention to drop the draft ordinance was unclear. He said he was under the impression that the City had delayed action on the draft ordinance in order to hear from the public at the September 3 workshop.

Shaena again assured that the draft ordinance would not be considered further.

Public notification of the workshop became another topic of discussion. Many said they had heard of the workshop informally, and that posting a notice at the post office was of no avail because the post office was no longer open and few people go there.

Some in the audience suggested that the notifications sent out on the blank side of the water bill should be printed in red, or in a larger font, so that they would have a better chance of being read.

Shaena advised the audience that the City has an email notification called “Your Town.” She urged that residents ask to be included on the mailing list, and provide their email addresses to the City office.

Wendy Schink questioned Attorney Albright’s comment that the right-of-way should be available for people to walk on, and affirmed that she recalled no language from the August meeting suggesting that the draft ordinance would not be considered any further.

A woman complained about speeding on McCoy Street. McCoy Street was extended through to Bewley Street with the development of the Spruce Rose project, and said she had been promised that there would be speed bumps to slow down the traffic.

One gentleman commented that he recently came from Idaho, and that he enjoys Bay City’s informality and hopes that won’t change.

Vacancies in City Government
The Planning Commission has gained a member and lost a member. Morgan Christenson joined us in July. She filled a vacancy created by the resignation of Chris Gant. So, the net result is one vacancy remaining to be filled.

To apply, simply fill out an application at the City office. To be eligible, you must live within the City of Bay City, or within the Urban Growth Boundary outside the City.

A Day at the Pearl
On Saturday, August 30, Bay City celebrated its first city-wide celebration since the centennial, which took place in 2010.

I was asked to be the Grand Marshal for the parade --- why, I’ll never know --- and got to ride in a Mustang convertible furnished by Tillamook Ford. Sadly, it was drizzling that morning, and we had to ride with the top up.

Sharline was supposed to ride in the convertible with me, but she was feeling poorly and I chose to leave her home. Good thing, though. With the convertible top up, there would have been no way she could have sat in the back seat. But, the parade committee gave her a beautiful bouquet of yellow lilies, for which she thanks the committee.

First prize for parade entries went to the VFW’s “combat” vehicle, an ammo trailer pulled by a military-looking SUV.

In the afternoon I went back downtown to check the goings on. I missed the library event, which ended at 3 p.m., but I found Sara Charlton, Tillamook County librarian, listening to music in the tennis court. She said 80 people went through the library exhibit.

The Arts Center had several children, wearing safety glasses, of course, learning how to chisel stone, under the watchful eye of Charlie Wooldridge. Parked outside was a trailer with two large canvases, where children could express themselves artistically. Inside, there were vendors offering a rather eclectic range of craft items for sale.

Darrell Griffith told me that the parade had at least one reluctant “entrant.” It seems that a driver entering Bay City got routed into the parade directly in front of the fire engine, and ended up driving the entire parade route. I certainly hope that guy didn’t have an out-of-state license plate.

Outdoor Burning
As of August 1, outside burning is strictly prohibited. We are in our annual dry season, and that will continue until the fall rains begin. That burning ban includes burning in burn barrels! We are experiencing an especially serious fire situation throughout the state.

The Fire Department recommends that you look carefully at your property, especially the property around your houses, and clear away any easily-burning fuel you find. If we have a wildfire here in Bay City, an event that is highly possible, there are many properties where dry brush or grass is dangerously close to dwellings.

And, while you’re at it, check your smoke alarms. (All I have to do to test mine is to toast a couple of slices of bread. That thing makes enough racket to wake the dead.)

You can still have small camp cooking fires in properly designed fireplaces or fire pits if you are camping, but be sure to check the regulations at your campground.

Reservations for the DAV Van
County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day. When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service
County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

 

Veterans’ Service Office
Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity
Our VFW post will take on a slightly higher profile this summer. We rode in the Dairy Parade, in the Rockaway Beach 4th of July parade and in the Garibaldi Days parade.

We shared a booth with Soil and Water at the County Fair, thanks to the good offices of our mutual member, Rudy Fenk. We entered Jim Henry’s “combat” vehicle in the Pearl Festival parade, and won first prize.

And, now, our plans for our Veterans Day celebration are kicking into high gear. My good friend, Carol McAndrew, informed me that the school district has approved our application to hold the 18th annual Veterans Day celebration in the Don Whitney Auditorium in the High School.

The Tillamook Air Museum hosted our Veterans Day event for the last time last November. The Museum is in the process of moving to Madras. The VFW post is grateful to the Tillamook Air Museum for hosting our previous 17 Veterans Day celebrations.

The members of our post have been wondering about the possibility of keeping a museum at the Blimp Hangar, but making it more of a military museum, with all sorts of military equipment on display. Wouldn’t that be a great thing for Tillamook!

Worn Flags
I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace
Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Fresh has discontinued its Wednesday evening dinners for the summer, but look for them to resume in the fall.

Bay City Arts Center
No word yet on the September Artist of the Month.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, September 21. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

The Arts Center is conducting weekly drop-in yoga classes on Monday and Thursday evenings at 6 p.m. Cost is $5 per class.

Mark your calendars for a major event in October. On October 18, BCAC is hosting a “Pillar Party.” The pillars on the east side of the building are in need of repair, and repairs don’t come cheap. So what better way to raise money for the repairs than to throw a party. BCAC will host a Bollywood-themed party with creative East Indian food and decorations, and everyone is encouraged to dress the part. Wear your favorite sari.

If you would like to contribute to the Pennies for Pillars campaign, contact Leeauna or Helen, at (503) 377-9620. Check the BCAC Facebook page for the latest details.

Starving artists may obtain cheap paint at CARTM in Manzanita, Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore in Bay City, and Tillamook County Public Works in Tillamook. This is recycled latex paint available in nine colors. Cost is $24 for a 3.5 gallon bucket. The paint is a mix of indoor/outdoor, and is suitable for both. If you’re thinking of a mural, this is enough to cover a 700 to a possible 1,000 square foot area.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line. Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad The Oregon Coast Crawler returns to the rails in 2014. RailsNW and the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad will take you on a memorable 10-hour journey through beautiful Oregon scenery on tracks that have not seen service since the great storm of 2007.

In fact, these tracks have not seen steam service for many more years. The train will be pulled by the McCloud River Railroad #25, an Alco 2-6-2 steam locomotive which was featured in the movie, “Stand by Me.”

The consist will include an open car for unparalleled views of the beautiful autumn color. All passengers will also have seating in an enclosed coach. The Crawler will make the round trip from Garibaldi to Salmonberry. The crew has spent many hours repairing storm damage to the tracks beyond Wheeler, so you will be able to enjoy scenery which, up to now, has been available only to bikers and hikers.

The Crawler will depart Garibaldi at 9 a.m., October 4, and arrives at Salmonberry at 1:15 p.m. The train returns to Garibaldi at 7 p.m. There will be at least three photo runbys, and more will be added as time permits. A box lunch will be served.

There is a limit of 120 passengers, so it is recommended that reservations be made as soon as possible. Cost of the excursion is $120 per person. No children under age 5 will be permitted. Advance purchase of tickets will be required. There will be no walkups.

For those who would like a shorter excursion, special arrangements can be made.

You may book by phone by calling RailsNW at (503) 292-5055 or by visiting the Web site at www.railsnw.com.

The Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad is also running daily round trips from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach. I you haven’t ridden behind a steam locomotive, here’s your chance. There is no experience like it.

Bits and Pieces
Sharline continues to recover from her appendectomy. She still tires easily, but she’s making progress. Sadly, when you’re in your ‘80s, you don’t bounce back as quickly as you would in your ‘20s.

I came home a few days ago and saw mama and her two spotted fawns watching me as I drove slowly up the hill. When I neared the top, the two fawns split, but mama still stood there, watching me. Finally, she followed her little ones up the hill, seeking the cover of some evergreens. As I was unloading my pickup, I heard a galloping sound. The two little ones were busy playing tag, paying me no further heed. I sure hope they don’t chase each other out onto Portland Avenue.

It’s been a rather busy time for me. It seems like there is some meeting to attend almost every day. I wonder how I ever found time to go to work before I reired.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be Thursday, September 18, 6 p.m., at the Ad Montgomery Community Hall.

 

August 17, 2014

BAY CITY, August 17, 2014 --- Here it is, mid-August already. The sun is setting earlier every night. Summer never seems to last long enough. We’ll have to get Gordon to do something about that.

City Council

There was practically a full house for the August 12 City Council meeting. Mayor Shaena Peterson moved several items to the top of the agenda to accommodate the people who had come to discuss them.

Sara Charlton spoke on the Pearl Festival, which will be held August 30. She passed out copies of a poster she had made for the festival. She thanked the sponsors of the event, which include KTIL Radio, Tillamook Country Smoker, Bay City Arts Center, Tillamook County Pioneer Museum, Tillamook County Library, Bay City Jewel, Sunset Pearl Vacation Rental, Tillamook Bay City RV Park, Yurt on the Bay and Averill Trucking.

She also expressed her appreciation for use of the Transient Room Tax revenues to support the Festival. 70 percent of revenues from the TRT must be used to promote tourism.

Pat Vining, chair of the Parks Committee, addressed the City Council about the grant for the initial phase of the upgrade to Watt Family Park. The City has been awarded a grant of $75 K dollars, which must be used by a given date. Pat expressed his concern over the sudden illness of the city engineer and other factors which have interfered with development of the park.

City Recorder Linda Downey reported that she had talked with the people at Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, and said that they would work with the City on that issue. The City has received many grants from OPRD, and has had an excellent relationship with that agency. The Skate Park and the Gazebo are examples of past performance on OPRD grants.

Written proposals will be submitted to the Council at its next regular meeting, setting out a course of action.

In response to a question from the audience, it was reported that the camp host had left and would not be coming back. Linda said she had had contact with some people in Tillamook who have names of available camp hosts.

Robin Weber and Wendy Schink were present for the discussion of undeveloped rights-of-way. City Attorney had drafted a proposed ordinance on use of rights-of-way, but stated that such an ordinance was unnecessary.

Basically, if one wishes to use an undeveloped right-of-way, the intended user must first obtain a license from the City with the agreement that any licensed improvements are temporary, and that they must be removed when directed by the City. Lois also pointed out that any such license is a recorded document.

There is basic disagreement about the status of the rights-of-way. The City does not own them, but has jurisdiction over them for transportation and utilities. There is also disagreement over “entitlement” to use an undeveloped right-of-way, i.e., whether one is “entitled” to use the entire width, or whether the person’s “entitlement” is confined to the one-half adjoining the person’s property. The way Bay City was platted, nobody owns the rights-of-way, and no taxes are paid on them.

Concilor Robert Pollock commented that he regards the matter as a dispute between two neighbors, and commented further that the improvements made by Schink and Weber beautify the right-of-way.

Bob Miles asked whether a resident could remove blackberries from an undeveloped right-of-way, and Wendy Schink commented that the City is not liable for anything the City has not built.

It appeared that the consensus of the Council was to consider the draft ordinance no further when Miles asked, “Rough draft is tabled, yes?” There will, however, be a town hall workshop September 3, 6 p.m., in the Ad Montgomery Community Hall, when the public can weigh in on the matter.

For two years the City has been trying to bring the tennis courts up to standard. Several underground springs were taken care of, and the courts were paved in 2013. Remaining to be done is the final coating on the courts, which, according to Brian Bettis, would cost about $6,500 for the materials.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith reminded the City that he needed to acquire a new infrared camera in time to have it installed in the new fire truck. He discussed several other items, including the need to go out for bids and the insurance binder for the new truck.

The camera, he said, would cost about $5,100.

City Attorney Lois Albright explained that in order to exempt an item from public bidding, it is necessary to explain why three bids cannot be obtained.

Brian Bettis, still acting as Public Works Superintendent, asked about getting the necessary signatures for his water reports until he completes his certification requirements. The Council agreed to continue the existing contract with the Tillamook Water Department.

The issue of properties lacking water and other utilities was discussed. A request to Tillamook County regarding the property on 18th Street had produced no response. The Council agreed to ask the County once again for some help in the matter.

Brian reported that all the river crossings were complete, and that some payments continue to be withheld until the contractor provides proof that subcontractors have been paid, and provides as-built locations of the new waterlines.

Brian also invited the Council’s attention to the fact there is no meter to measure flow of water between Tillamook and Bay City.

Ron Stillmaker, sitting in for Steve Donovan who is ill, reported that engineering is complete on the project to move the electrical controls from the pump house to a separate building. The project will be conducted in two phases: Construction of a new building to house the electric panels, and installation of the electrical controls themselves. Documents must now be prepared to go to bid. The Council authorized Brian to proceed.

The contracts between the City and the Juno and Latimer water systems will be referred to the Public Works Committee for review. Initially, the City had contracted with Juno and Latimer to perform maintenance. The version under consideration would require Juno and Latimer to contract for their own maintenance, leaving the City to furnish the water, read the meters and send out the bills.

The Council agreed to seek an easement over the former Tillamook PUD substation to provide access to Public Works. The easement would be a cheaper alternative to purchasing the property outright.

The Council adopted Resolution 14-07, authorizing the hiring of a new Public Works Superintendent from within.

The Council read Ordinance 659, which would extend the City’s moratorium on siting medical marijuana facilities to May 1, 2015. The Council set a special meeting for August 25 to adopt the ordinance.

The Council also read Ordinance 660, repealing ordinances 599 and 606, the previous ordinances governing the Charter franchise. Final adoption will take place at the special meeting of August 25.

Following an executive session, the Council appointed Brian Bettis as Public Works Superintendent, retroactive to August 1. Since Brian is now an “at will” employee, the Council agreed to reimburse him for 35 hours of comp time he had accrued, since “at will” employees are not entitled to comp time.

Vacancies in City Government

The Planning Commission has gained a member and lost a member. Morgan Christenson joined us in July. She filled a vacancy created by the resignation of Chris Gant. So, the net result is one vacancy remaining to be filled.

To apply, simply fill out an application at the City office. To be eligible, you must live within the City of Bay City, or within the Urban Growth Boundary outside the City.

Bay City Fire Department

The Bay City Volunteer Firefighters’ Association held its annual picnic in the engine bay of the fire hall Saturday, August 16.

The event was well attended, according to Fire Chief Darrell Griffith, though an exact head count was not immediately available.

This year, one of the hot dogs offered was a really HOT dog, made with jalapenos. I passed that one by, but the lady sitting across from Sharline and me had one. From her reaction, I judged that a little bit of jalapeno goes a long, long way.

Wendy Schink and Robin Weber manned a table to give out information on Map Your Neighborhood, a project they have been working on for about a year. They are signing up neighborhood captains and training them to meet with their neighbors and pass out information on surviving a major quake and tsunami.

I had to take Sharline home early because she had undergone abdominal surgery only a week ago. At 83 years of age, one doesn’t snap back as fast as when one was young.

Outdoor Burning

As of August 1, outside burning is strictly prohibited. We are in our annual dry season, and that will continue until the fall rains begin. That burning ban includes burning in burn barrels! We are experiencing an especially serious fire situation throughout the state.

The Fire Department recommends that you look carefully at your property, especially the property around your houses, and clear away any easily-burning fuel you find. If we have a wildfire here in Bay City, an event that is highly possible, there are many properties where dry brush or grass is dangerously close to dwellings.

And, while you’re at it, check your smoke alarms. (All I have to do to test mine is to toast a couple of slices of bread. That thing makes enough racket to wake the dead.)

You can still have small camp cooking fires in properly designed fireplaces or fire pits if you are camping, but be sure to check the regulations at your campground.

 

Bay City Pearl Festival

The Bay City Pearl Festival, set for August 30, will offer something for everyone. Following is a list of the activities for that day:

The parade will start at 11 a.m.

Tours of Kilchis Point Reserve will take place at 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. The Kilchis Point Reserve is an ongoing project of the Tillamook County Pioneer Museum to preserve native flora, and eventually have exhibits of Native American life before the pioneers, and of pioneer projects in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Bay City Arts Center will conduct art demonstrations from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

OMSI will present a program, “Everyday Encounters with Science,” 2 p.m. at the Bay City Library and Bookmobile.

Starting August 13 and ending August 27, there will be a Coloring Contest. There will be three levels: Ages 2 to 5; 5 to 8; and 9 to 12.

Pearls in a Jar: Guess how many. The jar will be at the Bay City Library. Cost will be 25 cents per guess, or five guesses for a dollar. Prizes will be awarded for the three closest guesses. Winners will be announced August 30.

And, there will be vendors across from City Hall from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and music in the tennis courts from noon to 6 p.m.

See you all there. Everyone have a great time!

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity

Our VFW post will take on a slightly higher profile this summer. We rode in the Dairy Parade, in the Rockaway Beach 4th of July parade and in the Garibaldi Days parade.

We are sharing a booth with Soil and Water, thanks to the good offices of our mutual member, Rudy Fenk. At the end of August, we hope to have a role in the Bay City Pearl Festival as well. The Post had been talking about a flag raising ceremony to open the festival.

And, maybe Jim Henry will enter his “combat” vehicle in the parade.

And, now, our plans for our Veterans Day celebration are kicking into high gear. My good friend, Carol McAndrew, informed me today that the school district has approved our application to hold the 18th annual Veterans Day celebration in the Don Whitney Auditorium in the High School.

The Tillamook Air Museum hosted our Veterans Day event for the last time last November. The Museum is in the process of moving to Madras. The VFW is grateful to the Tillamook Air Museum for hosting our previous 17 Veterans Day celebrations.

The members of our post have been wondering about the possibility of keeping a museum at the Blimp Hangar, but making it more of a military museum, with all sorts of military equipment on display. Wouldn’t that be a great thing for Tillamook!

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace

Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Fresh has discontinued its Wednesday evening dinners for the summer, but look for them to resume in the fall.

Bay City Arts Center

August “Artist of the Month” features a collaboration of art from its Art to Market Program participants. Artwork will be available for purchase for the entire month of August. Stop in and view the art any Tuesday through Thursday.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, August 17. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

BCAC will co-host an art booth with Latimer Quilt and Textile Center at the Farmers’ Market August 23. For more information, contact the BCAC office.

The Arts Center, in conjunction with the Pearl Festival Committee, is looking for vendors for the festival on August 30. Booth space is available for $10, plus $5 for an electric connection. Extended setup time will be available. Those interested should call the BCAC office (503) 377-9620 to reserve a space.

The Arts Center will conduct art demonstrations August 30, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Starving artists may obtain cheap paint at CARTM in Manzanita, Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore in Bay City, and Tillamook County Public Works in Tillamook. This is recycled latex paint available in nine colors. Cost is $24 for a 3.5 gallon bucket. The paint is a mix of indoor/outdoor, and is suitable for both. If you’re thinking of a mural, this is enough to cover a 700 to a possible 1,000 square foot area.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad

The Oregon Coast Crawler returns to the rails in 2014. RailsNW and the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad will take you on a memorable 10-hour journey through beautiful Oregon scenery on tracks that have not seen service since the great storm of 2007.

In fact, these tracks have not seen steam service for many more years. The train will be pulled by the McCloud River Railroad #25, an Alco 2-6-2 steam locomotive which was featured in the move, “Stand by Me.”

The consist will include an open car for unparalleled views of the beautiful autumn color. All passengers will also have seating in an enclosed coach. The Crawler will make the round trip from Garibaldi to Salmonberry. The crew has spent many hours repairing storm damage to the tracks beyond Wheeler, so you will be able to enjoy scenery which, up to now, has been available only to bikers and hikers.

The Crawler will depart Garibaldi at 9 a.m., October 4, and arrives at Salmonberry at 1:15 p.m. The train returns at Garibaldi at 7 p.m. There will be at least three photo runbys, and more will be added as time permits. A box lunch will be served.

There is a limit of 120 passengers, so it is recommended that reservations be made as soon as possible. Cost of the excursion is $120 per person. No children under age 5 will be permitted. Advance purchase of tickets will be required. There will be no walkups.

For those who would like a shorter excursion, special arrangements can be made.

You may book by phone by calling RailsNW at (503) 292-5055 or by visiting the Web site at www.railsnw.com.

The Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad is also running two daily round trips from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach. I you haven’t ridden behind a steam locomotive, here’s your chance. There is no experience like it.

Bits and Pieces

Sharline continues to recover from her appendectomy. She was able to attend the annual Firefighters’ picnic, but she still tires easily and we went home early.

Mama deer and the two babies continue to visit our yard, as does the other doe. They are certainly enjoying my blackberries, as evidenced by the fact that there are no more blackberries within easy reach.

My neighbor shared some blackberry cobbler with us the other day. It was sure good, but the downside was that a couple of seeds lodged under my dentures. Ouch!

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be Thursday, August 21, 6 p.m., at the Ad Montgomery Community Hall.

 

 

August 8, 2014

BAY CITY, August 8, 2014 --- it’s August already. Each year, the summer seems to go by ever faster.

To Have and Have Not
Our newly-hired Public Works Superintendent, Alan Tuckey, resigned abruptly effective July 24. This was quite a shock for everybody.

The City Council, at a special meeting, appointed Brian Bettis to the position. Brian still has several certifications to obtain, but he has been working diligently to earn them.

I wish Brian well in his new position. He has a tough job, so let’s give him all the support we can.

Vacancies in City Government
The Planning Commission has gained a member and lost a member. Morgan Christenson joined us in July. She filled a vacancy created by the resignation of Chris Gant. So, the net result is one vacancy remaining to be filled.

To apply, simply fill out an application at the City office. To be eligible, you must live within the City of Bay City, or within the Urban Growth Boundary outside the City.

Bay City Fire Department
The Bay City Firefighters’ Association recently published its 2014 newsletter announcing that the City’s Public Protection Classification had changed from level 5 to level 3. Residents should advise their insurance companies of the change, which is effective August 1, according to Fire Chief Darrell Griffith, to determine whether the new classification would lower their insurance rates.

The newsletter also thanks all who have donated to the Firefighters’ Association fund to help support the department’s community service projects. This year the Association installed 107 new smoke detectors free of charge. And the newsletter asks all residents to check smoke and carbon monoxide detectors monthly.

The annual Fire Department picnic will be held August 16, starting at 11 a.m. The firefighters will provide the hamburgers, hot dogs and ice cream. Bring a side dish to share with your friends.

Finally, the Fire Department asks your help. Sometimes the firefighters have trouble responding to calls because they can’t locate the address. The Department recommends that residents assure that their house or mailbox numbers are visible, day or night. Everyone should look at their address numbers to be sure they are easily visible, especially at night, and that they are not concealed by shrubs or trees. Retroflective numbers, that is, dark numbers on a reflective surface, enhance visibility at night.

Outdoor Burning
As of August 1, outside burning is strictly prohibited. We are in our annual dry season, and that will continue until the fall rains begin. That burning ban includes burning in burn barrels! We are experiencing an especially serious fire situation throughout the state.

The Fire Department recommends that you look carefully at your property, especially the property around your houses, and clear away any easily-burning fuel you find. If we have a wildfire here in Bay City, an event that is highly possible, there are many properties where dry brush or grass is dangerously close to dwellings.

And, while you’re at it, check your smoke alarms. (All I have to do to test mine is to toast a couple of slices of bread. That thing makes enough racket to wake the dead.)

You can still have small camp cooking fires in properly designed fireplaces or fire pits if you are camping, but be sure to check the regulations at your campground.

Bay City Boosters
The Boosters Club is playing an active role planning the Day in the Pearl Festival, set for Saturday, August 30. Specifically, the Boosters are responsible for organizing the parade. I’ve been asked to be the grand marshal for this year’s parade. I’m told Sharline and I will get to ride in a red convertible.

There will be a variety of other activities for young and old. And, there will be craft vendors in the street outside City Hall, and in the Arts Center.

Assisting in preparations for the event are the Arts Center, the United Methodist Church, and the Pioneer Museum. I’m sure that list will grow.

I’ll have more information on the Pearl Festival in the next Back Fence.

The Boosters will resume their monthly meetings Friday, September 26, at 11:30 a.m.

To Spray or Not to Spray
Sharline and I were dismayed recently to find that all the blackberries, and whatever else was growing along Portland Avenue, had been sprayed. I am not a guy who gets his jollies by spraying vegetation on my property.

It turns out that the “culprit” was Tillamook P.U.D. I had previously granted them permission to come onto my property to cut trees that were growing up into the power lines, but not to spray.

The P.U.D. representative with whom I spoke said they routinely sprayed the blackberries yearly to make it easier for their people to service the lines. I noted that I preferred not to use sprays, for fear of harming wildlife or even people. (They used a lot of herbicide in Vietnam, and many veterans are now dealing with the long-term effects of the agents used.)

But, the representative told me, if we prefer not to have sprays used on or near our property, we need only post a No Spray sign and they will respect it. I expect that Rosenberg’s will soon experience a run on No Spray signs.

Also, my neighbor met with a P.U.D. representative, who stated that the crew got a bit carried away, according to my neighbor. He noted that there would have been no need to spray the berries along Portland Avenue because there is no way the blackberries could grow up into the power lines.

But, the berry canes are dead, and soon the roots will rot in the ground. The embankments along Portland Avenue are very steep, and the roots were instrumental in preventing debris slides. Depending on the herbicide used, the berries could possibly come back. If they don’t we’ll have some increased slide potential this winter.

Reservations for the DAV Van
County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service
County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office
Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity
Our VFW post will take on a slightly higher profile this summer. We rode in the Dairy Parade, in the Rockaway Beach 4th of July parade and in the Garibaldi Days parade.

We are sharing a booth with Soil and Water, thanks to the good offices of our mutual member, Rudy Fenk. At the end of August, we hope to have a role in the Bay City Pearl Festival as well. The Post had been talking about a flag raising ceremony to open the festival.

And, maybe Jim Henry will enter his “combat” vehicle in the parade.

And, now, our plans for our Veterans Day celebration are kicking into high gear. My good friend, Carol McAndrew, informed me today that the school district has approved our application to hold the 18th annual Veterans Day celebration in the Don Whitney Auditorium in the High School.

The Tillamook Air Museum hosted our Veterans Day event for the last time last November. The Museum is in the process of moving to Madras. The VFW is grateful to the Tillamook Air Museum for hosting our previous 17 Veterans Day celebrations.

The members of our post have been wondering about the possibility of keeping a museum at the Blimp Hangar, but making it more of a military museum, with all sorts of military equipment on display. Wouldn’t that be a great thing for Tillamook!

 

Worn Flags
I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace
Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Fresh has discontinued its Wednesday evening dinners for the summer, but look for them to resume in the fall.

Bay City Arts Center
August “Artist of the Month” features a collaboration of art from its Art to Market Program participants. Artwork will be available for purchase for the entire month of August. Stop in and view the art any Tuesday through Thursday.

On August 8 through 10, BCAC will host a three-day stone carving workshop from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Contact the BCAC office to register.

On August 9, Jesse Olsen-Bay, a San Francisco composer, will present an art song cycle based on the unpublished writings of his grandmother, legendary author and activist, Tillie Olsen. Jesse, an award-winning composer, accompanies himself on guitar, piano, percussion, toy instruments and found objects.

On August 11, join the Arts Center for Beach Art from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lunch will be provided. If you missed the long-term camp in June, join BCAC for one extra day of fun for ages six to 12 years. Participants will create a variety of projects with beach themes, using materials collected from our local beaches. Cost will be $20 per student, and scholarships are available. Call Leeauna at (503) 842-2701 for more information.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, August 17. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

BCAC will co-host an art booth with Latimer Quilt and Textile Center at the Farmers’ Market August 23. For more information, contact the BCAC office.

The Arts Center, in conjunction with the Pearl Festival Committee, is looking for vendors for the festival on August 30. Booth space is available for $10, plus $5 for an electric connection. Extended setup time will be available. Those interested should call the BCAC office (503) 377-9620 to reserve a space.

Starving artists may obtain cheap paint at CARTM in Manzanita, Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore in Bay City, and Tillamook County Public Works in Tillamook. This is recycled latex paint available in nine colors. Cost is $24 for a 3.5 gallon bucket. The paint is a mix of indoor/outdoor, and is suitable for both. If you’re thinking of a mural, this is enough to cover a 700 to a possible 1,000 square foot area.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad
The Oregon Coast Crawler returns to the rails in 2014. RailsNW and the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad will take you on a memorable 10-hour journey through beautiful Oregon scenery on tracks that have not seen service since the great storm of 2007.

In fact, these tracks have not seen steam service for many more years. The train will be pulled by the McCloud River Railroad #25, an Alco 2-6-2 steam locomotive which was featured in the move, “Stand by Me.”

The consist will include an open car for unparalleled views of the beautiful autumn color. All passengers will also have seating in an enclosed coach. The Crawler will make the round trip from Garibaldi to Salmonberry. The crew has spent many hours repairing storm damage to the tracks beyond Wheeler, so you will be able to enjoy scenery which, up to now, has been available only to bikers and hikers.

The Crawler will depart Garibaldi at 9 a.m., October 4, and arrives at Salmonberry at 1:15 p.m. The train returns at Garibaldi at 7 p.m. There will be at least three photo runbys, and more will be added as time permits. A box lunch will be served.

There is a limit of 120 passengers, so it is recommended that reservations be made as soon as possible. Cost of the excursion is $120 per person. No children under age 5 will be permitted. Advance purchase of tickets will be required. There will be no walkups.

For those who would like a shorter excursion, special arrangements can be made.

You may book by phone by calling RailsNW at (503) 292-5055 or by visiting the Web site at www.railsnw.com.

The Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad is also running two daily round trips from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach. I you haven’t ridden behind a steam locomotive, here’s your chance. There is no experience like it.

Bits and Pieces
Our solitary doe continues to visit, but now she has company. Another mama with a pair of young, spotted twins is now making the rounds. They like my yard because there’s lots of cover for them.

Sharline and I had quite an experience this week. I came home from a meeting Thursday about noon, and Sharline told me that she wasn’t feeling especially well, and that she was having a bout of vertigo.

I took her to Urgent Care at the Adventist Clinic, where our doctor, Shirley Arneson, did a pretty thorough examination. She sent Sharline for a CAT scan at the hospital, which confirmed her opinion that Sharline had a hot appendix. She summoned Dr. Pitts, who had looked at the scan results. He admitted her directly to the hospital.

By evening, Sharline was lacking her appendix. Dr. Pitts had intended to remove the appendix laparoscopically, but discovered that such would not be technically feasible. So, the appendix came out the old-fashioned way, through a slit in the belly. (McBurney’s Point revisited.)

In spite of her having been sliced open, Sharline, on her first day post op, was doing very well. Two of our daughter came by today and visited for several hours. Sharline enjoyed it, and it’s always great when the family can get together.

Dr. Pitts expects Sharline to remain in the hospital through the weekend.

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be Thursday, August 21, 6 p.m., at the Ad Montgomery Community Hall.

 

July 14, 2014

BAY CITY, July 14, 2014 --- The Independence Day holiday is now history, and it’s time to get back to work.

To Wash or Not to Wash

That sounds almost Shakespearian, doesn’t it? But it was the question on the morning of July 5. When I stopped by the post office early that morning, I ran across a friend who had been looking for the Fire Department car wash, and I told him where it was: in the parking lot at the Smoker.

I stopped by the city-wide rummage sale in the parking lot for The Landing to see how things were going, and then headed for the Smoker to get my own wheels their annual scrubbing. But, alas, when I arrived, I found an infinite deal of nothing taking place. I checked out all the parking areas, and still nothing. No car wash.

Later in the day, I contacted our fire chief, Darrell Griffith, who explained the situation. It’s summer, he said, and some of the firefighters are out of town on vacation. Several others were ill, and only eight were available to do the car wash.

The eight guys available to wash cars, Darrel explained, would be the same eight guys who would answer a fire call. If a call came in, he said, having to secure the car wash operation and get his people to the fire hall would cost some time, and that would slow the department’s response to a call.

Darrell added that the car wash would be rescheduled later in the summer when more members are available.

City Council

The City Council held its regular monthly meeting July 8.

Jack Naval who owns property on Hare Street in the Goose Point area, addressed the Council, asking that the Council consider allowing him to donate property for a public right-of-way in exchange for a platted street containing several large trees which the neighbors don’t want to see cut down. Presently, Mr. Naval can’t develop or sell his property without developing the street in question.

Mr. Naval added that some of his land would be given to the Kilchis Reserve for a handicapped parking area.

The Council took no action, other than to advise Mr. Naval that he would have to present a plan to the City before such a land swap could be considered. He was also advised that any such plan would have to be surveyed and engineered before City staff could consider it.

Under Visitors’ Propositions, the Council authorized Mayor Shaena Peterson to sign a proposed follow-up letter to the Tillamook Postmaster asking for a progress report on reopening the Bay City Post Office.

Public Works Superintendent Alan Tuckey reported that the new lines under the Kilchis River were cut into the system July 2, a little later than initially planned. The job took from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., during which time, the Kilchis Regional Water System was receiving its water from Tillamook.

Alan also reported that the contractor working on the Latimer Road resurfacing project was doing about 1,000 feet per day, and that Public Works was watching the progress carefully because of the waterlines located along the road. One ruptured water line had to be repaired. These water lines were installed many years ago, and the exact locations of some of the lines is uncertain.

Starting the following day, Alan added, the contractor would be using about 30K gallons per day to mix the concrete being used for the resurfacing.

Alan also reported that ODOT planned to resurface much of the U.S. 101 corridor during the summer of 2015, and will do some resurfacing work on Hayes Oyster Drive this year.

It is of interest to note, that on July 8 the Tillamook Headlight-Herald published an article describing a waterline break on Brickyard Road, for which the City of Tillamook opened its intertie with the Kilchis Regional Water System to supply Tillamook with water while the waterline break was repaired. The intertie was made possible by FEMA funding to improve the area’s overall disaster preparedness, the article said. The intertie was completed in 2012.

Alan also reported that there were some electrical problems at the RV campsites in the lower park, which need to be addressed. He added that two sewer lines were not operable in the lower park.

Alan also reported that he had filed complaints with Tillamook County about the residence on 18th Street, and said he would ask the County Health Department for a status report.

The Council reappointed John Sollman to a four-year term on the Planning Commission, to expire June 30, 2018; and appointed Morgan Christenson to fill out the vacancy created by the resignation of Chris Gant, term to expire June 30, 2017.

The Council set a public workshop to discuss a proposed draft ordinance regulating use of undeveloped rights-of-way, to take place Wednesday, Sept. 3. Mayor Peterson wants to receive public input on the matter before bringing it back before the Council.

Darrell Griffith presented his recommendations for dealing with fire complaints and a proposed Citizen Comment Form to record complaints. Darrell noted that the Fire Department is there to handle fire emergencies, but should not be involved in handling fire complaints. He said that fully 80 percent of all fire complaints are nuisance complaints, e.g., smoldering excessively smoky fire, or whether someone has a burn permit.

Tom Imhoff said he would prefer not to see the Fire Department handling purely nuisance complaints.

The Council approved use of the Citizen Comment Form.

Vacancies in City Government

The Planning Commission has gained a member and lost a member. Morgan Christenson will join us in July. She fills a vacancy created by the resignation of Chris Gant. So, the net result is one vacancy remaining to be filled.

To apply, simply fill out an application at the City office. To be eligible, you must live within the City of Bay City, or within the Urban Growth Boundary outside the City.

Bay City Fire Department

The Bay City Firefighters’ Association recently published its 2014 newsletter announcing that the City’s Public Protection Classification had changed from level 5 to level 3. Residents should advise their insurance companies of the change, which is effective August 1, according to Fire Chief Darrell Griffith, to determine whether the new classification would lower their insurance rates.

The newsletter also thanks all who have donated to the Firefighters’ Association fund to help support the department’s community service projects. This year the Association installed 107 new smoke detectors free of charge. And the newsletter asks all residents to check smoke and carbon monoxide detectors monthly.

The annual Fire Department picnic will be held August 16, starting at 11 a.m. The firefighters will provide the hamburgers, hot dogs and ice cream. Bring a side dish to share with your friends.

Finally, the Fire Department asks your help. Sometimes the firefighters have trouble responding to calls because they can’t locate the address. The Department recommends that residents assure that their house or mailbox numbers are visible, day or night. Everyone should look at their address numbers to be sure they are easily visible, especially at night, and that they are not concealed by shrubs or trees. Retroflective numbers, that is, dark numbers on a reflective surface, enhance visibility at night.

Burning Suggestions

Burn permits for 2014 are available at the City office at no charge.

And remember, please, that when you burn, you want a hot, clean fire. Please consider your neighbors when you burn. You don’t want to generate a lot of smelly smoke, which can be very annoying to everyone.

The most recent word is that all open burning will cease July 15, and all burning on August 1. That means, get your barrel burning done before August 1, because after that there will be no outdoor burning until the rains return.

But be aware that this year’s dry weather may very well result in an earlier termination of outside burning, so be sure to check the sign at the fire station for current burning restrictions.

You can still have small camp cooking fires in properly designed fireplaces or fire pits if you are camping, but be sure to check the regulations at your campground.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters Club is playing an active role planning the Day in the Pearl Festival, set for Saturday, August 30. Specifically, the Boosters are responsible for organizing the parade.

There will be a variety of other activities for young and old. The Fire Department has been asked to prepare burgers and hot dogs, and there will be a beer garden, probably behind The Landing.

There will also be a skateboard competition, an oyster stew contest, and craft vendors. Assisting in preparations for the event are the Arts Center, the United Methodist Church, and the Pioneer Museum. I’m sure that list will grow.

There will also be craft vendors, but location of craft booths or tables has not yet been decided.

The Boosters will resume their monthly meetings Friday, September 26, at 11:30 a.m.

To Spray or Not to Spray

Sharline and I were dismayed recently to find that all the blackberries, and whatever else was growing along Portland Avenue, had been sprayed. I am not a guy who gets his jollies by spraying vegetation on my property.

It turns out that the “culprit” was Tillamook P.U.D. I had previously granted them permission to come onto my property to cut trees that were growing up into the power lines, but not to spray.

The P.U.D. representative with whom I spoke said they routinely sprayed the blackberries yearly to make it easier for their people to service the lines. I noted that I preferred not to use sprays, for fear of harming wildlife or even people. (They used a lot of herbicide in Vietnam, and many veterans are now dealing with the long-term effects of the agents used.)

But, the representative told me, if we prefer not to have sprays used on or near our property, we need only post a No Spray sign and they will respect it. I expect that Rosenberg’s will soon experience a run on No Spray signs.

Also, my neighbor met with a P.U.D. representative, who stated that the crew got a bit carried away, according to my neighbor. He noted that there would have been no need to spray the berries along Portland Avenue because there is no way the blackberries could grow up into the power lines.

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

 

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity

Our VFW post will take on a slightly higher profile this summer. We rode in the Dairy Parade last Saturday, in the Rockaway Beach 4th of July parade.

In August we will be sharing a booth with Soil and Water, thanks to the good offices of our mutual member, Rudy Fenk. At the end of August, we hope to have a role in the Bay City Pearl Festival as well. The Post had been talking about a flag raising ceremony to open the festival.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace

Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Fresh has discontinued its Wednesday evening dinners for the summer, but look for them to resume in the fall.

Bay City Arts Center

The reception for the July Artist of the Month took place July 11. BCAC is featuring a collaboration of art from its Art to Market Program participants. Artwork will be available for purchase for the entire month of July.

From July 15 through August 1, Helen Hill will lead a Plant Medicine class at the BCAC. This is a three-week introductory course, which includes six classes held on Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuition for all six classes is $50, or $45 for BCAC members. Contact the BCAC office for details and to register.

On July 19, BCAC will host a film festival featuring local and regional film makers with a variety of movie topics. There will be a dinner by donation at 6 p.m., with movie showings from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Admission to view the films is $5. Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

Also on July 19, local artist and art teacher, Breanna Moran, will lead a watercolor workshop from noon to 3 p.m. at BCAC. The class is open to anyone interested in learning watercolor techniques. Tuition for the workshop is $15 per person.

The next monthly Pancake Breakfast will be held Sunday, July 20. That’s a real deal at only $5 for all you can eat.

The Arts Center will host its first High School Beach Art Camp July 28 through August 1, from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. daily. Tuition for the camp is $60, which will include a home-made lunch. The camp will be taught by art teacher Breana Moran of Tillamook High School; Steve Albechtson of Neah-Kah-Nie High School; and Mark Cavatorta of Nestucca High School. As a bonus, the students will be the August Artists of the Month, and their creations will be displayed through the month of August.

BCAC will co-host an art booth with Latimer Quilt and Textile Center at the Farmers’ Market June 28, July 12 and 26, and August 23. For more information, contact the BCAC office.

On August 2, Helen Hill will hold a one-day workshop in the Art of Theater Arts. It will be a hands-on workshop for anyone interested in exploring original playwriting, improv and theater arts as a teaching tool, community builder, or as a personal passion. The workshop will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and lunch will be potluck. Fee for the course is $20. Call Helen at (503) 801-4143 to reserve a spot.

On August 8 through 10, BCAC will host a three-day stone carving workshop from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Contact the BCAC office to register.

The Arts Center, in conjunction with the Pearl Festival Committee, is looking for vendors for the festival on August 30. Booth space is available for $10, plus $5 for an electric connection. Extended setup time will be available. Those interested should call the BCAC office (503) 377-9620 to reserve a space.

Starving artists may obtain cheap paint at CARTM in Manzanita, Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore in Bay City, and Tillamook County Public Works in Tillamook. This is recycled latex paint available in nine colors. Cost is $24 for a 3.5 gallon bucket. The paint is a mix of indoor/outdoor, and is suitable for both. If you’re thinking of a mural, this is enough to cover a 700 to a possible 1,000 square foot area.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The e-mail address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad

The Oregon Coast Crawler returns to the rails in 2014. RailsNW and the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad will take you on a memorable 10-hour journey through beautiful Oregon scenery on tracks that have not seen service since the great storm of 2007.

In fact, these tracks have not seen steam service for many more years. The train will be pulled by the McCloud River Railroad #25, an Alco 2-6-2 steam locomotive which was featured in the move, “Stand by Me.”

The consist will include an open car for unparalleled views of the beautiful autumn color. All passengers will also have seating in an enclosed coach. The Crawler will make the round trip from Garibaldi to Salmonberry. The crew has spent many hours repairing storm damage to the tracks beyond Wheeler, so you will be able to enjoy scenery which, up to now, has been available only to bikers and hikers.

The Crawler will depart Garibaldi at 9 a.m., October 4, and arrives at Salmonberry at 1:15 p.m. The train returns at Garibaldi at 7 p.m. There will be at least three photo runbys, and more will be added as time permits. A box lunch will be served.

There is a limit of 120 passengers, so it is recommended that reservations be made as soon as possible. Cost of the excursion is $120 per person. No children under age 5 will be permitted. Advance purchase of tickets will be required. There will be no walkups.

For those who would like a shorter excursion, special arrangements can be made.

You may book by phone by calling RailsNW at (503) 292-5055 or by visiting the Web site at www.railsnw.com.

The Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad is also running two daily round trips from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach. I you haven’t ridden behind a steam locomotive, here’s your chance. There is no experience like it.

Bits and Pieces

Our solitary doe continues to come around. When I got home a couple of days ago, there she was, munching the grass around my rhododendron. She wasn’t bothered a bit when I got out of my car and went up the steps onto my deck and into my house.

Last week I shared some memories of my landing at Inchon. Come September, it will be 64 years since that memorable day.

Late in the afternoon on the day of the landing, we were taken across the causeway leading from Wolmi-do to Inchon proper, and bivouacked on the second floor of a building in the downtown area. From a balcony we could see the street below, now seemingly flooded with Marines plus lots of news people with cameras.

As a dumb 19-year-old kid, I really didn’t know all the “dos” and “don’ts” of military life. I made the mistake of laying out my sleeping bag near the door. About 10 p.m., along came a warrant officer who rousted out the closest dozen guys to the door, and informed us that we were “volunteers.” He took us out to the site of the proposed division hospital, a schoolyard and building, actually, and told us we were to hold the area until the rest of the two hospital companies arrived the following day.

Our instructions, as we were assigned positions along the perimeter, were to “shoot to kill,” should we see anything moving in the field beyond. But, with the star shells going off over the field and slowly settling to the ground, everything, every shadow, looked like it was moving. (I wonder whatever happened to the Geneva Conventions, which said that medical personnel are not supposed to engage in active combat.)

Happily, all of us were blissfully unaware of the tactical situation around us. All we had to do was lie on that damp ground and watch those damned star shells settling slowly earthward. It was there that I realized that I couldn’t have aimed my carbine if I had to, because I couldn’t see the front sight! How, pray tell, do we actually win wars?

VFW Post 2848 meets the third Thursday of the month. The next meeting of the Post and Auxiliary will be Thursday, July 17, 6 p.m., at the Ad Montgomery Community Hall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
     

 

 

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