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Over The Back Fence 2015

December 4, 2015

BAY CITY, December 4, 2015 --- This is about the latest I’ve ever been for the Back Fence. As you are aware, I lost a dear friend in November. I’m still trying to help his widow through all the complexities that follow loss of a spouse in this day and age. I’ll have to make a New Year’s Resolution to do better in 2016.

T.J. Robinette

T.J. Robinette’s need continues, and will for some time.

T.J. had corrective surgery earlier in November, and I am told by Trina, at Cutting Loose, that he did pretty well. She told me that he is due for another checkup in the next few days.

An account, the Robinette Family Fund, is still accepting donations at Umpqua Bank.

Burning Season

Burning season continues in full force. The green sign has graced the front of the Fire Station since a day or so after I published my last Back Fence. Now, that’s ancient history.

But, remember, this is December, and a new year is about to start. You’ll need to renew your burn permit before then. Burn permits can be obtained at the City Office, and there is no charge. Please note that the City Office remains open half days until the new office employee is hired.

City Council

The City Council has held two meetings since I last published the Back Fence. I will try to summarize them because so much time has passed, and old men tend to forget things if they wait too long to write about them.

At the October 13 meeting, County Tourism Director Nan Devlin gave the Council a progress report on the Transient Lodging Tax recently passed by the voters. She cautioned the Council on the criteria to determine whether a proposed use of the tax proceeds actually addresses the goal of boosting tourism.

John O’Leary, Garibaldi City Manager, stated he was forming a steering committee to review firefighting needs and challenges of the Garibaldi Fire District. Mayor Shaena Peterson appointed David Olson to the steering committee. David is an employee of the Port of Garibaldi.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith cautioned homeowners to reduce the amount of fuel (dry brush, etc.) near homes and businesses. The Department recently had to extinguish a brush fire in the Forest Park area at the end of the fire season. Had this blaze occurred earlier in the fire season, as many as six homes could have been lost.

The Council adopted Resolution 15-15, setting rates and other conditions for rental of the Ad Montgomery Community Hall. City residents may rent the hall for $100 for a day, plus a $150 cleaning deposit. Daily hall rental fee for non-residents of the City will be $150. Those renting the hall must provide proof of liability insurance for at least $1,000,000.

The City continues to work on a revised Personnel Ordinance. Major issues are the duties of the Fire Chief for which he receives a stipend, and the duties of the recently authorized Code Enforcement Officer.

The Council noted the need to revise the Transient Room Tax Ordinance to rename it a Transient Lodging Tax. The change is necessary to agree with the wording of the County ordinance.

The major issue at this meeting was a complaint by Joanne Schaeffer that her neighbor, Lena Erickson, had placed material within the public right-of-way. Attorney John Putman made a brief presentation on Schaeffer’s behalf. City Recorder Linda Downey stated in her memo dated October 9, that Ms. Erickson had been contacted, and that she agreed to remove the material found to be in the public right-of-way.

Councilor Kari Fleisher noted that there are structures in the right-of-way for both parties. Mayor Shaena Peterson asked that the matter be reviewed by City staff.

Mayor Peterson, in her presentation, announced the availability of grants from the proceeds of the transient lodging tax to fund projects to promote tourism. Grant applications must be submitted prior to January 15, 2015.

The mayor also urged that the City subscribe to the HEAL (Healthy Eating and Living) program. the program is a joint project of the Public Health Institute and the League of Oregon Cities. The program offers technical assistance to improve the health and fitness of residents through such things as walking trails and programs to encourage healthy eating and living.

Mayor Peterson also discussed improvement of the City’s Web site, and suggested looking into services offered by Aha, Inc., a Web site design company located in Lake Oswego.

Councilor Kathy Baker asked whether anything could be done about the growing pile of smelly oyster shells at Pacific Seafood. Counselor David Olson said he would speak with the management, since the oysters are on Port property.

The November 10 meeting dealt with some additional issues.

As its first order of business, the Council accepted the resignation of David Pace. His reason for resigning, as stated in his letter, is that he “can not serve on a City Council that picks and chooses what ordinances or policies to follow or enforce instead of treating every citizen equally and fairly.” As an example, he referred to, “… the incident with Shaena and Dave Birch and Carol Maxheimer and the complaints filed against some current city councilors that are being ignored by the council, city hall and the Mayor.”

A property owner in Bay City inquired why he had to go through the process of obtaining a conditional use in order to do a property line adjustment. The City had, indeed, adopted text amendments to the Development Ordinance, which identified property line adjustment as a conditional use.

I must accept responsibility for this faux pas. A property line adjustment is not a land use, but rather a process. This, and several other processes, should be removed from the Allowable Use Matrix found in Section 1.3, and listed solely in the Application Matrix found in Section 4.105 of the Development Ordinance. I would guess that, after more than four years of intense work on the text amendments, I wasn’t functioning on all cylinders when I overlooked that line in the Section 1.3 matrix.

Sabrina Pearson, the City’s planning consultant, is preparing material to rectify this mistake. Sadly, correction will likely require another public hearing.

The Council adopted Ordinance 667, establishing a transient lodging tax, and repealing Ordinance 657. The only change of substance was changing the name of tax from Transient Room Tax to Transient Lodging Tax.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith reported that the Fire Department is stepping into an education and training mode for the winter, and that they are looking for several more members to round out an academy class. There are three new applicants for the class, but the target for the class is between five and seven. The Fire Department is always looking for new members. Presently the Department has 19 members.

He also reported that he had attended the Nov. 3 meeting of the Garibaldi Fire District Steering Committee. The Garibaldi Fire Chief is retiring and there are no prospects for internal replacement. Possible considerations coming out of the meeting were to create a fire district with a tax base for the current geographic area; or to create a fire district with a tax base to include other fire areas, which could include Bay City.

Meetings of the Steering Committee are set for the first Tuesday of every month, and the Committee was challenged to provide an update in 120 days.

Public Works Superintendent Brian Bettis reported that the City had been awarded a Special Cities Allotment Grant of $50,000. The money will be used to repair Bewley Street from Tillamook Avenue to Williams Street.

Brian also reported that the telemetry is being worked on, and that a rebuilt motor was installed to replace the pump motor for well number one. During late November and December, Public Works will perform leak detection in the sewer lines from 5th and B Streets, and along the highway to the treatment plant.

He also reported that Pacific Oyster is “somehow discharging sand and crushed up oyster shells in the collection system … .” He added that a TV inspection of the lines is set for November.

Joanne Schaeffer asked the City for permission to replace her cedar post retaining wall with a retaining wall constructed of concrete blocks for durability. The retaining wall extends 13 feet into the Seattle Avenue public right-of-way, and was built many years ago when the house was constructed.

Brian noted that drainage on Seattle Avenue is poor. It was argued that keeping the retaining wall at its present length would divert runoff water from the downhill neighbor’s property.

Attorney Lois Albright said that encroachments into the public right-of-way must be licensed by the City, and must be removed when directed by the City. Mayor Shaena Peterson stated that the City is not yet ready to move on this issue.

There has been no movement on the Weber sewer connection, and Attorney Albright was directed to write a letter to Mr. Weber.

The Council set a workshop on the Personnel Ordinance, and set a public hearing for the December meeting.

The Council authorized the City to proceed with a proposed Web site design contract with Aha Consulting, Inc., of Lake Oswego. Cost of the design will be $3,000, plus 1,200 per year, payable in advance. Brian Gilday had made a presentation to the Council at a recent workshop.

The Council voted to participate in the Tillamook County Year of Wellness, or the HEAL program discussed in October.

And, as a final, pre-holiday gesture, the Council agreed to purchase the ham for a joint Council-Fire Department Christmas Dinner, to be held Dec. 19 at 6:30 p.m.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters Club is proud to announce that there will be Christmas lights in Bay City this year. Through a grant from Tillamook P.U.D., the Boosters installed the electrical connections to light the Bay City sign in the red rock area, and to install Christmas lights. For years, Bay City has been completely dark over the holidays, in contrast to virtually every other U.S. 101 community along the Coast.

The Boosters will hold their Christmas Party on Friday, December 18, at noon. Bring a gift for the gift exchange, and some food for the Food Bank.

 

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity

VFW Post 2848 celebrated Veterans Day with a gala ceremony at the Tillamook Air Station Museum.

Post Commander Jim Allenbrand, on behalf of the entire post, thanks Phyllis Rice and the Museum staff for their hard work to make the celebration possible. The S.O.S Breakfast took in enough money to make a nice Christmas gift for the state’s two veterans’ homes. The post also thanks the Port of Tillamook Bay for its support of the Veterans Day celebration.

Theme for this year’s celebration was Medical Personnel in the Military. Keynote speaker John Sollman told of some of his misadventures with the Marine Corps in Korea and Vietnam, and of his various assignments stateside and overseas as a Hospital Corpsman and later as a Medical Service Corps officer.

But the real message was the improvements that have occurred over the years. Now, Navy Hospital Corpsmen may become Physicians’ Assistants with Warrant Officer rank. Both men and women can now be commissioned in the Nurse Corps of all armed services, thanks to a young Navy Corpsman from Montana, who persuaded the Air Force to give him a Nurse Corps commission.

In other matters, the post is working with Nathan Rogers of Westcare, who is striving to improve veterans’ access to health out here on the Oregon Coast. The post is also developing a Vets’ Night Out program, through which parents can drop off their kids for several hours in order to enjoy a night out together. More on this later, as the post works out the kinks.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace

Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Bay City Arts Center

December Artist of the Month will be Karen Gale, whose oil paintings will be on display the entire month. There will be a reception Dec. 4, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

On Saturday, Dec. 5, the Arts Center will host a traditional Irish Christmas Dinner and silent auction.  The dinner will feature shepherd’s pie, both with meat and vegetarian, Irish stew, soda bread, salad and dessert. Cost of the dinner is just $20 per person. There will also be live music for your enjoyment. The silent auction will include tickets to the Oregon Symphony, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, and lots more.

It is advised to call in advance for reservations, because seating will be limited.

On December 20, the third Sunday, BCAC will hold its all you can eat Pancake Breakfast.

BCAC is getting its Toddler Art program back up and running. Contact Leeauna at the BCAC office, (503) 377-9620, for more details.

The Yoga program is currently suspended. Watch for further announcements.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

And, for all you artists out there, BCAC is looking for people who would like to participate in the Artist of the Month program. If you’re interested, please call Leeauna Perry at the BCAC office. Selected artists will be featured for a month during the calendar year. This is a great way to get your work featured and generate some art sales.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The email address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad

Summer is over, and the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad has been operating weekends so long as the weather cooperates. Trips are from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach. There may be some special holiday trips posted on the OCSR Web site.

Costs of these round trips to Rockaway Beach are: Adults --- $18; Seniors, 62+ --- $17; Children, 3--10, $10; and locomotive cab rides go for $50.

For information about special holiday trips, you may also call (503) 292-5055.

Bits and Pieces

As I said, it’s been a rough fall.

Sharline had some problems with her Pacemaker, and ended up at St. Vincent’s for six days in late October. While she was there, they discovered a blood clot in her lower left leg, and she was placed on anticoagulation therapy.

That requires trips to the laboratory to have blood samples taken to determine the current clotting factor.

Then, I was involved in preparing for this year’s Veterans Day program out at the Air Station, plus giving the keynote speech. I’m happy to report that the program went off very well, and the Air Museum staff worked hard to make the program a success. They even got an electric heater to try to make the auditorium more comfortable. Having the event under the tent helped to retain the heat, and that really helped a lot. I add my own thanks to Phyllis Rice and the Air Museum staff for their hard work to make the event a success. And my thanks go also to the Port of Tillamook Bay, which now operates the Air Museum.

If all this wasn’t enough, I lost one of my dearest friends in November, and I’ve been called upon to help his widow cope with all the things that confront a bereaved widow following loss of her man. John and Dorothy Gettman had celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary on October 3.

With all those things going on, who has time to write a Back Fence?

But, on the positive side, we are pleased to report that the deer have reappeared. We spotted them the other day as we were heading to Downie’s for one of their wonderful breakfasts.

 

 

September 30, 2015

BAY CITY, September 30, 2015 --- I’m late. I know it. Just too much going on for my superannuated bones. Sorry about that.

Bay City Pearl Festival

The Pearl Festival is now history. In fact, it came pretty close to being blown away. None of us will ever forget waking up to howling winds and just enough rain to dampen things a bit.

Pearl Committee chair Sara Charlton had a busy time coming up with a workable Plan B. The Odd Fellows Lodge opened its doors to the Boosters Garage Sale, originally to be held in The Landing west parking lot. And the Boosters did very well in their new indoor venue, I am told.

Other vendors had been scheduled to set up on the newly finished tennis court, but they were moved inside the Arts Center. The music, which was supposed to be in the park, was moved to the Ad Montgomery Hall, behind City Hall.

Performing music, now under cover, were the following groups: Tico Marimba at 10 a.m.; Wil Duncan at 11:30 a.m.; Ocean Bottom Country Blues at 12:45 p.m.; Eric Sappington at 2 p.m.; Joe Wrabeck at 3:15 p.m.; The Gospel Trio at 4:30 p.m.; and Benny and the Bay City Rockers at 5:45 p.m.

Everything I’ve heard indicates that moving the music program under cover was appreciated by everyone.

A food vending truck wasn’t able to handle the winds, and didn’t show up.

Because of the storm, the Coast Guard Color Guard had to cancel. They called me the afternoon before, to advise that they had to be available for possible rescue duty at sea. When I heard that, I took down the canopy over my gazebo and put away all my deck furniture in anticipation of the high winds.

But Doug and Jeanette Steinbach came up with a substitute color guard on very short notice. Our color guards for the parade were Jeremy Belonte, 15; Michael Zaugg, 14; and Ethan West, 13. They are members of Boy Scout Troop 687, sponsored by the Latter Day Saints Church. They did a great job!

They used lighter-weight flags and parade poles because of the winds. They wouldn’t have been able to handle the VFW’s parade flags in that “gentle breeze.”

Units in the parade were: Mayor Shaena Peterson, Pearl Festival Committee members Sara Charlton and Jeanette Steinbach, Festival Honoree Phyllis Wustenberg, the Bay City United Methodist Church, Bob Collins and his antique car, The Landing, the Elks Drug Float, VFW Post 2848 with its “combat vehicle,” the Oregon Coast Dance Theater Dance Team, the Tillamook County Bookcart Drill Team, Senator Betsy Johnson, Commissioner Mark Labhart, Commissioner Tim Josi, and the Bay City Boosters. Doug Steinbach led the Pet Parade, but, sadly, I don’t have the names of the pet owners or their pets.

Jim Henry drove the “combat vehicle,” and I rode shotgun.

I would be remiss if I didn’t point out that we were not in this event alone. Many local businesses have helped by sponsoring events or simply by making contributions for general use.

The committee thanks the following sponsors for their generous contributions: Bay City Arts Center, Pacific Seafood, Bay City Boosters, Sheltered Nook on Tillamook Bay, Pioneer Museum, Tillamook-Bay City RV Park, Tillamook County Library, Tillamook Radio, and the Tillamook Country Smoker. And, again, things were moving so swiftly right up to the event, that others I’m unaware of may have added to the pot.

Judges for the event were Sharon Stafford, Angie Cherry and Chuck Everheart. The Mayor’s award went to Phyllis Wustenberg, the Festival Honoree; the Theme Award was given to The Landing; the Best Bystander award went to Kate Klobas/Sammie Schmader; Best Pet award went to Doug Steinbach’s boxers; the Community award was given to the Oregon Coast Dance Theater Dance Team; and the Best Entry award went to Bob Collins and his antique car.

Many thanks to Pearl Committee chair Sara Charlton and members Dia Norris, Gretchen Power, and Doug and Jeanette Steinbach. If I have missed a member, please forgive me.

Bay City spirit couldn’t be dampened by a little rain and wind, and we had a really great festival. See you all next year.

T.J. Robinette Fundraiser

T.J. Robinette’s need continues, and will for some time.

I am told that he will have reconstructive surgery in early November, and we should all pray for a good result.

An account, the Robinette Family Fund, is still accepting donations at Umpqua Bank.

Skidmarks on the Highway

Just an update on the Blue Ranger saga. I got the windshield replaced right away, and the rest of the work within two weeks of my accident, when my pickup skidded on road oil and I ended up in the ditch between U.S. 101 and the railroad.

Tillamook Ford completed the cosmetic repairs, plus a few adjustments to the steering mechanism and the headlights, in short order. My Ranger looks like a new car. The guys at the Ford Garage did an outstanding job.

Just be aware of the dangers of driving on a wet road after a prolonged dry spell. The road oil floats to the surface and the road turns into a skating rink. Likewise, standing water on a highway always presents the danger of hydroplaning. I’ve seen that more than once, but, happily, never experienced it myself. Slow down a bit when encountering standing water. This assures better contact between your tires and the actual road surface.

Burning Season

Not that I enjoy printing news of which everyone is already aware, but for the record I’ll report that the yellow sign is posted at the Fire Station. We can burn once again, but in burn barrels only. All burning must be completed before sundown, which is getting earlier every night.

Now that I can burn my paper, my garbage can is a lot lighter.

City Park Improvement Fund

When you visit the City Office, you’ll notice a contribution jar sitting on the main counter. That is for funds to help support the park.

Jackson Morris came up with the idea to solicit contributions to help with improvements to the Al Griffin Memorial Park. The tennis court has been finished and looks really great. There is grant money to pay for the work, but grant funds need to be matched.

So, next time you’re in the City Office, drop a buck or two into the jar. You’ll be glad you did.

City Council

The City Council met Wednesday, September 9, owing to the first Monday having been Labor Day.

Under Visitors’ Propositions, Phyllis Wustenberg, Pioneer Museum Board member, explained to the Council the effects of the new 50-year lease granted the Museum in connection with the Kilchis Point Reserve.

Approximately 14 acres of land in the Goose Point area were given by the County to the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde, which immediately gave the Pioneer Museum a 50-year lease on the land as part of the Kilchis Point Reserve.

The land is sacred to the tribes, which felt that the Pioneer Museum and the Kilchis Point Reserve would serve as excellent stewards of their land. According to Museum Director Gary Albright, the lease from the Tribe is far better than the previous lease with the County.

Phyllis’ explanation of the new leasing arrangement did much to allay fears that there might be another casino in the works.

Brian Bettis reported that he has tested the water and wastewater as required by the State. He also smoke-tested the wastewater collection system. The result, he noted, was that there are lots of leaks in the system.

He also reported that the electrical remodel for the pump house was complete, and that about 25 million gallons of water was pumped from the two wells during the month of August. He added that final inspection had not been done on the electrical remodel, and that he might have to call upon Steve Donavan to do it.

Brian also said he had gotten ODOT to do something about the standing water on the highway next to the sidewalk between 5th Street and Tillamook Ave.

Brian also reported patching some potholes and removing some tree branches from rights-of-way.

Also accomplished during August were striping of the tennis court and installing the nets. Brian also reported Watt park engineering was complete, and that a place for the bathroom has been cleared, and he hopes to have it completed by the end of September.

It was also reported that a practice burn on June 21 had resulted in damage to a neighboring structure and a boat. Mayor Shaena Peterson noted that this had not been formally reported to the City. Fire Chief Darrell Griffith was out of town and not available to comment.

Robert Pollock reported that the Transient Lodging Committee was designing a grant application form to use TLT revenues to support projects to promote local tourism. He also reported that the committee had printed 1,000 brochures, all of which have been distributed. A Web site, baycitytourism.com, is also in the design process.

The major issue of the evening was a revised hall rental policy.  The City’s insurer had recommended that hall rental should require proof of liability insurance of $1 million when no alcohol is served, and $2 million when alcohol will be consumed.

The VFW had produced proof of such insurance, but the major problem was the Bay City Boosters Club. A number of proposals had been made regarding the Boosters, but none of them would suffice.

It had been recommended that the Boosters be made a formal City committee, but that idea failed when it was noted that the City didn’t control the Boosters, so they could not be considered an official committee.

The matter was left open until the October 13 meeting.

The Harold Weber residence on Alderbrook Road remains without a sewer connection, required because his property is within the City limits. The City has not had an adequate response from him regarding the sewer connection, and Attorney Lois Albright that the City needs to give him a timeline to make the connection. Councilor David Pace suggested talking to Weber.

Pursuant to a request from Sharon Isbell, Secretary for the Astoria Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Council declared that the week of September 17 through 23 would, hereafter, be observed by the City as Constitution Week.

At the request of the Community Action Team, the Council authorized sending a letter in support of the Community Action Team’s request for a grant to support the Oregon Regional Housing Rehabilitation Program.

The Council also discussed changes needed to the Personnel Ordinance to add a Code Enforcement Officer and modify the Fire Chief’s position description to include only those duties for which he gets paid.

Shaena announced her intent to hold quarterly Goal Setting Workshops, starting in October. One of the matters to be taken up in the October workshop will be Brownfield testing of the PUD transformer site.

Attorney Albright expressed her concern that the Fire Department didn’t participate in the Pearl Festival this year. Lois also announced that she would attend the League of Oregon Cities to take part in discussion of legal issues facing Oregon cities. She hoped to return with more information about marijuana outlets.

It should be noted that Shaena distributed Chrome Book computers to each member of the Council, the Fire Chief, Public Works Superintendent and to John Sollman, asking that he demonstrate the computer to the Planning Commission.

The computers, costing $249 each, would replace the volumes of paper that are printed out and assembled for each Council meeting. This move should result in considerable savings in paper and staff time, and reduce wear and tear on the office printers.

 

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters held their first fall meeting Friday, Sept. 25.

John Sollman briefed the Boosters on City Council activity during the summer, and Robert Pollock discussed the City’s dilemma over requiring the Boosters to have insurance, at considerable cost to the Boosters’ limited resources.

Robert assured the Boosters that he was confident that the Boosters would not be required to purchase insurance. He said he felt, with the revenues from the Transient Lodging Tax, the City could afford to buy the insurance for the Boosters in recognition for all the volunteer work they have done for the City.

The Boosters elected Gretchen Power as its Chair for the coming activity year. Dallas Pfeiffer gladly relinquished his gavel.

The Boosters next meet Friday, October 30. Bring your Hallowe’en disguises.

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity

VFW Post 2848 met Thursday, September 17, at 6 p.m.  The Vets Day Planning Committee met at 10 a.m. that morning at the Tillamook Naval Air Station Museum. The theme for this year’s celebration will be Military Medical Personnel.

The Post has had a very busy summer, which it capped off with yet another wild ride in the “Combat Vehicle” in the Pearl Festival parade. And a wild ride it was, given the howling winds which greeted festival-goers that last Saturday in August. But, after careful deliberation, the parade took place as scheduled. That was a real winter storm, except that the winds were warmer.

The post agreed to replace the Elks Lodge as the sponsor of a Boy Scout troop. The Troop meets at the First Christian Church, but the post will try to incorporate the Scouts in some of its activities. To start, Commander Jim Allenbrand and I attended the Scouts’ Flag Retirement Ceremony at the Elks Campground south of Tillamook. We will ask them to help greet and seat our invited dignitaries at the Veterans Day celebration at the Air Museum.

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace

Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Bay City Arts Center

During September, BCAC will have on display historical pictures of Bay City. The Arts Center is open 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday.

October 3 and 4, BCAC will host a West African singing, drumming and dancing workshop, led by Gabrielle Eggstein and drummer Mamadou Lamine Thioub. Tuition for adults is $96, and for Students $64. This includes both days of the workshop. BCAC members will receive a $5 discount. Class both days will run from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., with a lunch break from noon to 1 p.m. Participants must supply their own lunch.

Also on October 3 and 4, BCAC will present the Fun Orchestra, a group of 34 talented Tillamook and Lincoln County musicians. There will be five soloists performing various works with the orchestra. The October 3 performance will be at 7 p.m. at the Tillamook United Methodist Church. Admission is by donation.

On Sunday, October 4, the performance will take place at the Lincoln City Cultural Arts Center at 6 p.m., and admission will be $10 for persons aged 16 and up.

On October 10 and 11, BCAC will host another Discovery in Stone, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. The workshop is by donation, and tools will be available for use and purchase at the Arts Center.

On October 18, the third Sunday, BCAC will hold its all you can eat Pancake Breakfast.

And a look to the future. On November 14 there will be another Monopoly Board game night. Stay tuned for details.

BCAC is compiling a list of music teachers who actively provide individual instrument and voice instruction throughout Tillamook County. Instructors will be screened and contact information will be collected and consolidated. The list will be provided to persons interested in furthering their music education. Teachers interested in participating as part of the Tillamook County Music Teachers Network should contact the BCAC office and ask for Leeaunna, (503) 377-9620.

BCAC is getting its Toddler Art program back up and running. Contact Leeauna at the BCAC office for more details.

The Yoga program is currently suspended. Watch for further announcements.

Musicians also wanted! BCAC wishes to start a community symphony orchestra, and is seeking interested and experienced musicians to learn and perform intermediate level music. If you are interested, contact the BCAC office.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The email address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad

Summer is over, and the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad is now operating weekends so long as the weather cooperates. Trips are from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach, plus some longer excursions such as the fall excursion to view the beautiful foliage.

Costs of these round trips to Rockaway Beach are: Adults --- $18; Seniors, 62+ --- $17; Children, 3--10, $10; and locomotive cab rides go for $50.

The Oregon Coast Crawler will make its fall foliage trip to Salmonberry, with its photo runbys, false starts, and all sorts of other fun things.

The fall foliage trip to Salmonberry will take place this year on October 3, and the cost of the trip will be $125 per person. But one word of caution. This trip may be a sell-out, and the smart money would suggest that you make your reservations earlier rather than later to avoid being disappointed. Only 120 passengers can be accommodated.

For information, call (503) 292-5055.

Bits and Pieces

Dan Utterson has left Bay City. I believe he has moved to the Gladstone area, near his roots. He will be missed. Dan had operated his second hand store out of the building across from the Center Market. He had a great selection of cast iron, and we have a couple of great cornbread pans we got there. Take care, Dan, and stay safe.

Our deer continue to cruise through our yard every couple of days or so. The usual visitors are mama and the twins. And every now and then, there will be strangers passing through to sample the abundant blackberries, no doubt.

Sunday last, we had a glorious total lunar eclipse and a so-called Super Moon, which occurs when the moon is at its closest approach to Earth during its full moon phase. Sadly, I could not see the eclipse because by the time the moon got high enough to clear the trees to my east, the eclipse had ended. So I watched it on my Kindle Fire.

 

August 25, 2015

BAY CITY, August 25, 2015 --- This is proving to be a really busy summer. Read below and see why.

Bay City Pearl Festival

The Pearl Festival committee had its last meeting Friday at the Blue Heron. The committee is now at the point where the event is going to happen regardless of what anyone does.

I would be remiss if I didn’t point out that we’re not in this alone. Many local businesses have helped by sponsoring events or simply by making contributions for general use.

The committee thanks the following sponsors for their generous contributions: Bay City Arts Center, Pacific Seafood, Bay City Boosters, Sheltered Nook on Tillamook Bay, Pioneer Museum, Tillamook-Bay City RV Park, Tillamook County Library, Tillamook Radio, and the Tillamook Country Smoker.

There will be vendors at the tennis courts from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Boosters Rummage Sale in the Landing Parking Lot from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; live music in the tennis court area from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; the parade starts at 11 a.m. by the fire station; there will be artists at the Arts Center from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., plus vendors inside and a display of Bay City historical pictures; library open house runs from noon to 3 p.m.; Curt the Juggler will perform at City Hall at 2 p.m.; and there will be a tour of the Pioneer Museum’s Kilchis Point Reserve at 10 a.m.

And, of course, we mustn’t forget to mention that the Coast Guard will provide the color guard to lead the Bay City Pearl Parade. I am told that there will be many more entries in this parade than last year’s. There will even be pets this year, and there will be trophies awarded for best or most nearly unique entries.

Performing music in the park will be: Tico Marimba at 10 a.m.; Wil Duncan at 11:30 a.m.; Ocean Bottom Country Blues at 12:45 p.m.; Eric Sappington at 2 p.m.; Joe Wrabeck at 3:15 p.m.; The Gospel Trio at 4:30 p.m.; and Benny and the Bay City Rockers at 5:45 p.m.

And a few other notes. Our Grand Marshal this year will be Phyllis Wustenberg. Our three County commissioners will march in the parade, as will our state senator Betsy Johnson and our state representative Deborah Boone. And, of course, we’ll see our mayor, Shaena Peterson.

In addition there will be a food truck and an ice cream cart to purchase whatever your heart desires. I understand that the food truck will be located across from the park, at 4th and A Street, where electricity is available.

I’ll be there, and I look forward to seeing all of you there as well.

The committee looks forward to an enjoyable festival for everyone.

T.J. Robinette Fundraiser

T.J. Robinette’s need continues, and will for some time. He will require much reconstructive surgery for his injuries, An account, the Robinette Family Fund, is still open for donations at Umpqua Bank. Maybe that would be a good place for that tax refund you were trying to figure out how to spend.

His mom, Heather, told Sharline and me that T.J. is at home now, and doing well for what he’s been through.

Welcome to Bay City

Congratulations and best wishes to Sierra Scholerman on the birth of her daughter, Willa, who checked in at exactly nine pounds and 22 inches. Welcome to Bay City, little Willa. I’m sure your mom will have you checked out on operation of the city office in no time at all. The little girl got off to a really good start. She came at exactly the date predicted by the obstetrician. Sierra brought the baby to the August 10 City Council workshop, and she’s a real cutie. Take good care of her, Sierra. She’s a prize.

Skidmarks on the Highway

I got a real shock Saturday, August 15. It was 5 p.m., and I had left for the Safeway pharmacy to pick up a prescription for Sharline. It had been raining lightly, and there was still moisture in the air as I was going down Portland Avenue.

It being a Saturday, traffic was pretty heavy. I waited quite a while for a window large enough for me to enter the highway safely, make my turn to the left and gain speed to stay safely ahead of the car two blocks behind.

Surprise, surprise! My rear wheels fishtailed out to the right, and I steered into the skid, only to find the rear wheels now skidding to the left. The film of water on that two-month accumulation of road oil had turned the highway into a skating rink.

At this point, I was headed straight across the highway and into the deep ditch and dense blackberry that separated the highway from the railroad tracks. Thank heaven for the blackberries, because they brought my Ford Ranger to a controlled stop without deploying the air bags. The car was pitched down at about a 45-degree angle, and exiting the vehicle was a challenge.

Happily, some concerned motorists had seen me spin out and stopped to see if they could be of assistance. One of them called 9-1-1 for me, and asked whether I had been injured. Aside from getting pricked by a few blackberry thorns, I was just fine. I had been belted in, for which I am very thankful. Had I not been wearing my seatbelt, I most certainly would have had some cracked ribs, and perhaps also a dented skull from impacting the windshield.

The right lower corner of my windshield was shattered, but the glass remained in place. My front bumper took quite a jolt, and there was some damage to the paint, plus a few dents, on the right side of my vehicle.

I thank Sheriff’s deputy Kelly Awe for his help controlling traffic and helping me to my feet after I fell while trying to examine the back of my truck. Scovel’s Towing showed up in a few minutes and pulled me out of the deep ditch. I think it must have been eight or 10 feet below the level of the highway. The tow truck took me over to the parking area by Fresh, formerly ArtSpace. When the vehicle was let back down to the ground, I gave it a cursory check and started the engine. It was completely drivable, and I took it back home.

After I was safely home, the Scovel driver came up the hill to my house and handed me my dented front license plate and a few other artifacts from my trip into the ditch. That was a really nice touch, and I am most grateful.

This was a very good object lesson about driving after a “first rain.” The accumulation of road oil on a highway over several months of dry weather will become very slick and dangerous when there is a film of water on it. So, we’re still in our dry spell, and we need to watch out for the next rain. It doesn’t take much water on that road oil to make it extremely dangerous.

I thank my lucky stars, and the Big Guy upstairs, for confining the damage to my vehicle only, and the blackberries.

Burning Season

You all know by now that the red sign adorns the front of the Fire Station, where it will remain for the remainder of the summer. It’s turning out to be a dry one --- a really dry one.

City Park Improvement Fund

When you visit the City Office, you’ll notice a contribution jar sitting on the main counter. That is for funds to help support the park.

Jackson Morris came up with the idea to solicit contributions to help with improvements to the Al Griffin Memorial Park. The tennis court has been finished and looks really great. There is grant money to pay for the work, but grant funds need to be matched.

So, next time you’re in the City Office, drop a buck or two into the jar. You’ll be glad you did.

City Council Special Workshop

Mayor Shaena Peterson held a special workshop August 3, to review some issues that have arisen regarding the Fire Department and its relationship with Public Works and city administration. The agenda consisted of four items: Overview of the Fire Department structure; Personnel Ordinance as it pertains to the Fire Department; firefighters’ pay scale defined; and fire hydrant update.

The meeting was well attended, and most of the Fire Department was present. Apparently, the issue of fire hydrants arose when Shaena asked the chief of a nearby fire district about looking at Bay City’s hydrants. The responsibility for flow testing and clearing access to hydrants, in most jurisdictions, falls to public works. This interaction led to concerns by Fire Chief Darrell Griffith that he had been bypassed on an issue vital to the welfare and safety of Bay City residents.

Darrell was also concerned about the structure of the Fire Department and the payment of the volunteer firefighters. The firefighters are reimbursed for their expenses incurred for fighting fires, and the Fire Chief receives a stipend, in the process of being raised to $1,200 from $1,000 per month. The problem, Darrell explained, is differentiating between work paid by the stipend and work performed as a volunteer. A recent audit of City accounts questioned the manner in which the volunteers were reimbursed for their expenses.

Darrell also requested that the Personnel Ordinance be modified on several points, to address the problem that the “on duty” time “never ends.” Shaena responded that, while definitive action could not be taken at a workshop, the City Council would address the matter, and the adjustment would be effective July 1.

City Attorney Lois Albright cautioned about having two apparent classifications for the Fire Chief, adding that the stipend is for “paperwork responsibilities.” She said the City needed to look at the organization of other volunteer fire departments.

Discussed also was the possibility of having other City staff help with the paperwork. Lois noted that Darrell prepares the budget for the Fire Department, to which Councilor Robert Pollock noted that budget preparation should be in the Personnel Ordinance.

A long-standing concern of Darrell’s is that complaints are referred to the Fire Department when they should have been referred to the city’s code enforcement officer. Such complaints generally involve illegal burning or excessive smoke generation. Darrell agreed that the new code enforcement officer, when on board, would be of help on this. He emphasized that he wanted nothing to do with nuisance complaints.

Becky Smith, who lives in the Goose Point area, noted that a large property near her house needed to be mowed, because of the inherent fire hazard in tall, dry grass. Shaena said that such things would be a prime concern for the code enforcement officer. Lois advised that a formal complaint be filed with the City.

It should be noted that the City’s code enforcement system is complaint-driven. There are no “code enforcement patrols” making the rounds looking for potential ordinance violations. It is up to the residents to initiate action by filing a formal complaint.

Lois suggested that the complaint form be modified to reflect its purpose as a request for action. Darrell stated that it’s presently a “comment form.”

Councilor Kathy Baker had some comments regarding complaints by phone after hours, which cannot be acted upon immediately. Several others commented on telephone complaints before discussion returned to the reimbursement of volunteer expenses.

Council member David Pace asked what kinds of administrative matters City staff could handle for the Fire Department.

Lois noted again that the City couldn’t give money directly to the Firefighters’ Association. Darrell responded that the City cuts a check to the Association, which he deposits and pays the firefighters their expense reimbursement. He added that the Association does other fundraising as well.

Lois explained further that the recent audit said the City cannot pay the Association directly, but that the City could contract with the Association and pay according to the contract.

Kathy Baker stated that the problems presented at the workshop could be resolved through mediation, and that the Council should not have to micromanage. Darrell noted that miscommunication between several parties gave rise to the current situation.

Several firefighters commented on the pay situation, and Shaena directed Attorney Albright to draft a resolution regarding firefighter benefits.

The firefighters had turned out en masse to support their Fire Chief and the Department, and asserted that something needed to be done to work things out. Several noted that Darrell was doing a great job, but was overburdened by the need to perform many mundane tasks.

Several firefighters and members of the audience commented on the need to clear the areas around the City’s fire hydrants.

Kathy Baker noted that there is apparently no master plan for Public Works, which would normally attend to fire hydrant accessibility and visibility. Several firefighters noted blockage of fire lanes by cars and RVs, especially at the ends of streets.

Kathy Baker got in the last word, asking Darrell what the Council could do to make the Fire Department more productive.

City Council

The City Council met August 11.

Under Visitors’ Propositions, Mary McArthur addressed the Council on loan funds to enhance economic development. McArthur is Executive Director of Columbia Pacific Economic Development team.

In addition to loan funds to help businesses grow, the organization also offers planning assistance, and acts as a conduit to work out regional solutions. Membership in the organization costs $250.

The second Tuesday in September follows the first Monday, which is Labor Day, Mayor Shaena Peterson changed the dates for the monthly workshop and meeting. The Council Workshop will be held Tuesday, September 8, and the City Council meeting will be held Wednesday, September 9.

Kari Fleisher reported on a special workshop to explore the feasibility of creating a city manager position. It would cost the City at least $100K to fund such a position, which would be too costly at this time.

Robert Pollock announced significant progress in structuring the administration of funds received through the Transient Room Tax. The committee is developing a brochure explaining uses to which the tax revenue can be put, as well as a Web site: www.baycitytourism.com. The next meeting is scheduled for September 2 when, Robert told me, the committee will finish an application form for Transient Room Tax revenues.

The money is to be used primarily for projects to promote tourism to the area. Gary Albright and the Pioneer Museum have been heavily involved in developing rules to guide uses of the tax revenues.

Public Works Superintendent Brian Bettis reported that the Streets Committee met for the first time in several years. He has submitted the grant application to pave Bewley Street. The committee selected three streets for paving during the current fiscal year: Main Street near its east end; 9th Street between Portland Ave. and Tillamook Ave.; and 6th Street between Portland and D Street.

Councilor David Pace pointed out that 6th Street presents special problems, because the location of the location of houses along the street, and the need to assure adequate drainage, limits the amount to which the street can be widened. City Engineer Steve Donovan added that the Tillamook Estuary Drainage Plan may affect what Bay City is doing.

Shaena said that the City needed to look at 7th Street as well. People along 7th Street have complained about the condition of the street. She suggested revising the ordinance governing the use of the $5 streets surcharge to allow things like ditching.

Steve reported on the mixing zone study, which will determine what the wastewater treatment plant can handle. He reported that average daily loading is well within the plant’s design capacity. He stated that we have a good plant, and the rest of the state may regard Bay City as a trend-setter.

But there are problems with the collection system. Too much rainwater gets into the system (inflow), and groundwater tends to leek into the system (infiltration.) The sewer pipes are old and cracked. He suggested that the City could buy more time by redoing the headworks now.

Brian advised that the system would be smoke tested starting August 24, and that the crew would be putting out door hanger notifications shortly.

The Council approved contracts for Sabrina Pearson as City Planning Consultant, and Tillamook Complete Janitorial.

The Council took up discussion of insurance for people or organizations renting the Ad Montgomery Community Hall. CIS, the city’s insurance carrier, recommends that those renting the hall show proof of $1 million coverage.

Several non-profit organizations use the hall regularly. The VFW has the required coverage, for which it pays $570 annually, and the United Methodist Church has insurance to cover their use of the hall. But the Bay City Boosters use the hall monthly but have never had insurance coverage. The Boosters operate on a very limited budget, but they do many things to benefit the City.

Costs provided by CIS range from $103 for an event with no performers and no alcohol, to $335 for an event with performers and alcohol.

The suggestion was made, to include the Boosters as a City committee, because of the many things they do to benefit the City. Designating them a committee would require that their meetings be publicized, and that they turn in their meeting minutes.

On the Weber sewer connection, Brian reported he had been unable to make contact, and recommended that they be sent a letter.

Shaena, in her mayor’s presentation, announced that she would be issuing Chrome Book tablets to the Council. Presently the preparation of Council packets uses up to several reams of paper, shortening the working lives of the printer and copier, and adding expense for the paper consumed. The Council packet will be uploaded to the councilor’s Chrome Books, which they will use during the meeting.

She added that I would be receiving a Chrome Book for a twofold purpose: 1) to provide my copy of the packet to help preparation of my Grapevine article; and 2) to introduce the tablet to the Planning Commission to see how it would work for them.

Each Chrome Book tablet will cost about $239. Tablets will also be provided to the Fire Chief and to Brian.

Shaena also spoke about confidentiality of persons submitting complaints to the City. Complaints are public records, but, according to the law, identity of the complainant may remain confidential. The exception to this is when a complaint ends up in court. Then, confidentiality of the complainant is trumped by the accused’s right to confront and cross examine the accuser. Shaena used as her guide the practices of the City of Salem.

The matter was set for further discussion and development.

Shaena commented on the need to make better use of the City’s three main committees.

Discussion was also held regarding Brian’s phone bill. He has no City phone. It was moved to help pay Brian’s phone bills at 75 minutes per month back to the time Brian was hired as Public Works Superintendent.

Brian announced that the tennis courts would be done before the Pearl Festival, and that the excavating had been done for the restroom in Watt Park, and that Terry Griffin was ready to start restroom construction. He added that Gary Oldencamp had been most gracious in his offer to allow use of his equipment.

Crystal Killion suggested using jail labor to help with the project.

 

Bay City Boosters

There will be no meetings during the summer. The Boosters will meet again at noon on Friday, Sept. 25.

Reservations for the DAV Van

County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office

Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity

VFW Post 2848 met Thursday, August 20, at 6 p.m.  The Vets Day Planning Committee met that morning at the Tillamook Naval Air Station Museum at 10 a.m. The theme for this year’s celebration will be Military Medical Personnel.

The Post has been having a very busy summer. We participated in the June Dairy Parade, followed in a few days by the Rockaway Beach Fourth of July parade. On July 25, the post had its “combat vehicle” in the Garibaldi Days parade.

The post shared space with Tillamook Soil and Water at the County Fair, as it did last year, thanks to Rudy Fenk. A year ago Rudy offered the Post a place in its display area, for which the post thanks Rudy and Tillamook Soil and Water most sincerely.

On August 29, the post and auxiliary will ride in the Bay City Pearl Festival parade, with the VFW riding is the “combat vehicle.”

Worn Flags

I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

A month ago, Jim Allenbrand, our VFW Post Commander, and I stopped by Five Rivers to pick up 20 worn flags. Later in the year, the post will assist the Boy Scouts in a respectful flag retirement ceremony. I’ll let you know how it goes.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace

Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Bay City Arts Center

August 1 and 2 featured another Discovery in Stone workshop. These workshops are open to all ages and all experience levels. The class is open house style instruction, with teachers and experienced stone carvers on hand to answer questions. Tools are available for use and purchase. The workshops are by donation.

August 14 to 16, BCAC hosted “Evening Gloves,” an original play by Helen Hill. The show featured local actors and actresses, and proceeds from the event went to support Helping Hands in their efforts to open a homeless shelter. On August 16, the play went on the road for a performance at North County Recreation District in Nehalem.

September 20 will feature BCAC’s monthly pancake breakfast, 8 a.m. to noon, all you can eat for $5.

August 24 to 28, BCAC is hosting a week-long Krafty Kidz art camp for ages 10 to 14. Camp runs M-F from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuition is $50 for the week, and includes lunch. Scholarships are available. Participants will create an array of art work. For more information or to register, call Leaunna in the BCAC office, (503) 377-9620.

BCAC, in partnership with Latimer Quilt and Textile Center, will host a Coop art booth at the Tillamook Farmers’ Market. If you would like to participate, please contact Leeauna Perry at (503) 377-9620. The cost is $15 per day, and the artists keep their sales proceeds. All items to be sold must be adjudicated in advance, according to market regulations. Remaining available dates during the summer are August 29 and September 19.

August 29, BCAC will host the Pearl Festival again this year from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Join us for a day of fun, music, art and more in downtown Bay City. For artists, BCAC has space for vendors inside the building. Cost for booth space is $10. Contact BCAC to reserve your space.

Also, BCAC will have a display of pictures of historic Bay City

BCAC is compiling a list of music teachers who actively provide individual instrument and voice instruction throughout Tillamook County. Instructors will be screened and contact information will be collected and consolidated. The list will be provided to persons interested in furthering their music education. Teachers interested in participating as part of the Tillamook County Music Teachers Network should contact the BCAC office and ask for Leeaunna, (503) 377-9620.

BCAC is getting its Toddler Art program back up and running. Contact Leeauna at the BCAC office for more details.

The Yoga program is currently suspended. Watch for further announcements.

Musicians also wanted! BCAC wishes to start a community symphony orchestra, and is seeking interested and experienced musicians to learn and perform intermediate level music. If you are interested, contact the BCAC office.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The email address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad

Summer is here, and the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad is in full swing, offering its daily round trips from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach, plus some longer excursions.

There will be three daily departures, from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach, through Labor Day. The train departs Garibaldi at 10 a.m., 12 noon and 2 p.m.

Costs of these round trips are: Adults --- $18; Seniors, 62+ --- $17; Children, 3--10, $10; and locomotive cab rides go for $50.

The Oregon Coast Crawler will make its fall foliage trip to Salmonberry, with its photo runbys, false starts, and all sorts of other fun things.

The fall foliage trip to Salmonberry will take place this year on October 3, and the cost of the trip will be $125 per person. I will publish more on the trip to Salmonberry in a later issue. But one word of caution. This trip may be a sell-out, and the smart money would suggest that you make your reservations earlier rather than later to avoid being disappointed. Only 120 passengers can be accommodated.

For information, call (503) 292-5055.

Bits and Pieces

I guess the biggest event of the month was my slide into the ditch and blackberries just south of the 5th Street entrance to Bay City.

Tillamook Ford is repairing my Ranger as I write these lines. I can’t thank them enough for their courtesy and for providing me with wheels for the week my truck is laid up.

The deer have been around, but infrequently. I have seen the little twins in my yard or my neighbor’s. They like chasing each other around the yard. I think mommy parks them here while she is off being a doe. It is about that season.

Dan Utterson is leaving Bay City. I believe he is moving to the Gladstone area, near his roots. He will be missed. Dan had operated his second hand store out of the building across from the Center Market. He had a great selection of cast iron, and we have a couple of great cornbread pans we got there. Take care, Dan, and stay safe.

And one more word on my spectacular swan dive into the blackberries, car and all. I was belted in, and it saved me some cracked ribs and a possible head injury. Use your seatbelts, even when driving short distances around town. You’ll be glad you did.

 

July 24, 2015

BAY CITY, July 24, 2015 --- Lots going on this month in Bay City and elsewhere. So much, in fact, that it’s hard to find the time to write about it. But I’ll certainly do my best to get it done.

T.J. Robinette Fundraiser
T.J. Robinette’s need continues, and will for some time. He will require much reconstructive surgery for his injuries, An account, the Robinette Family Fund, is still open for donations at Umpqua Bank. Maybe that would be a good place for that tax refund you were trying to figure out how to spend.

His mom Heather, told Sharline and me that T.J. is at home now, and doing well for what he’s been through.

Burning Season
You all know by now that the red sign adorns the front of the Fire Station, where it will remain for the remainder of the summer. It’s turning out to be a dry one --- a really dry one.

City Park Improvement Fund
When you visit the City Office, you’ll notice a contribution jar sitting on the main counter. That is for funds to help support the park.

Jackson Morris came up with the idea to solicit contributions to help with improvements to the Al Griffin Memorial Park. The park still needs to complete the tennis and basketball court and make other improvements. There is grant money to do some of this, but grant funds need to be matched.

So, next time you’re in the City Office, drop a buck or two into the jar. You’ll be glad you did.

City Council
The City Council met July 14 to address a number of pressing issues.

As its first item of business, the Council took up Ordinance 666, the revised Nuisance Ordinance, at a public hearing. Aside from some tweaking and refinement, the principal thrust of this amendment is to address so-called chronic nuisances, defined as, “Any condition(s) on any real property which has resulted in three violation letters issued by the City within any 12 month period.”

In addition to other abatement procedures, chronic nuisances may result in a fine of $250 for each day the chronic nuisance remains unabated, or the cost to the City to abate the nuisance, including attorney fees and staff time, whichever is greater.

Following the third reading by title only, the ordinance passed on a roll call vote, Counselor David Pace casting the sole No vote.

Owing to the absence of Sierra Scholerman during her maternity leave, the City Office will be open to the public half days as follows:

Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Tuesday and Thursday from noon to 5 p.m.

Special appointments may be scheduled during closed hours.

The Council then took up the seven-page complaint against Mayor Shaena Peterson, filed by David Burch and Carol Maxheimer. The complaint is supplemented by several photographs and numerous pages of Facebook posts.

Simply stated, our mayor stopped by their place at the corner of 5th Street and Hayes Oyster Drive, where a sale was in progress. Shaena advised David that he would have to move his merchandise out of the public right-of-way.

David was upset because the mayor interrupted a conversation with a customer to convey the message.

The building was erected long before anyone in Bay City was concerned about city streets and setbacks. Both the Burch/Maxheimer building and the Center Market building are located at the edge of the public right-of-way, and may even encroach slightly into the right-of-way.

David, who had displayed his merchandise on the gravel in front of his home and business, was told he would have to keep the display even with the two pillars supporting his second floor deck, as the pillars are at the very edge of the 5th Street right-of-way.

There was also an issue about parking, in that David had allegedly asked people to park their vehicles elsewhere, as they were blocking his business. The mayor had advised him that vehicles parked on the pavement fronting his home and business were legally parked.

Burch and Maxheimer also complained about the oyster shells stacked near the railroad tracks outside the Pacific Seafood oyster plant, noting that the odor on a warm day was most unpleasant.

Finally, the complaint to the City commented that the Center Market took deliveries that were stacked in several of the parking slots outside the store.

Discussion of the complaint might be described as contentious. David Burch challenged the mayor after an exchange of perspectives, saying, “Are you calling me a liar?”

Helen Wright said she had been looking at the place for 12 years, adding that “it’s an absolute disgrace to this City,” and vowing to continue until it is cleaned up.

Jackson Morris said that he doubted the place could pass fire inspection, describing it as an “embarrassment and a disgrace.”

City Attorney Lois Albright asked rhetorically how one resolved a squabble between two persons. Burch asserted that the mayor had stepped between him and his customer.

Albright also cited Bay City Ordinance 312, which provides in part, that “no merchandise shall be displayed or stored or sold on a sidewalk or street in the city of Bay City.”

Attorney Albright ended the discussion, noting that the City has the authority to deal with complaints, adding that the oyster shell complaint is one the City must deal with. She said the City had no direct jurisdiction, since the oysters are on Port of Garibaldi property. In other words, the City would have to register a complaint about the odor with the Port.

(Several days later, one person who had attended the meeting remarked that it seemed that the Council was “browbeating” David and Carol.)

Under visitors’ propositions, Sheriff Andy Long reported on his contacts with Chris Norris, a Bay City resident.

Apparently, there have been contentious relationships between Norris and some of his neighbors, which the Sheriff described. He urged any neighbor who felt threatened to call 9-1-1. If they felt they were being stalked, he urged them to get a stalking order from the County.

Attorney Albright advised the keeping of a written diary, which would be of great help if the matter ends up in court.

Mike Cohen made a brief presentation on behalf of the Economic Development Council, describing the services offered by the EDC, and that its offices were located at the Tillamook Bay Community College.

EDC, he said, is proactive in getting small loans out to businesses in the County.

Sara Charlton reported on the Pearl Festival. She reported that the festival is already twice the size of the one in 2014, and that the committee was receiving excellent cooperation and support from other businesses and organizations in and around Bay City. She said there would be a rummage sale by the Boosters, there would be activities at the Bay City Arts Center, music in the park sponsored by Pacific Seafood, and this year’s Grand Marshal is Phyllis Wustenberg.

Jackson Morris said he would like to see creation of a drug-free zone, but admitted creation of such a zone would require policing. He also suggested a liquor store as a means of bringing customers and outside money into Bay City. He said a liquor store would pay for a cop.

Darrell Griffith reported that the Fire Department, in June, completed 376 training and response hours, involving 24 calls. He noted that June was the busiest month in the Department’s history.

He reminded the City that as of July 1, all regulated burning was closed, but social fires (barbecues, etc.) were not covered by the closure. But, if the Oregon Department of Forestry implements Level 4 precautions, all social fires and campfires will be prohibited.

Darrell also expressed concern about the condition of fire hydrants at various locations throughout town, providing pictures for the Council to see how some hydrants are so overgrown with grass that locating them could be difficult. He also noted road conditions that would pose a hazard to personnel and equipment should they need to be traversed to reach a fire.

He also cited some intersections in town, where growth of grass and brush interfere with clear vision and pose a hazard to traffic. He also noted increasing activity in the right-of-way, with RVs, campers and boats parked for indefinite time frames. He also noted motor homes parked in the right-of-way, drawing power via extension cords.

He also noted inoperable vehicles, saying that these vehicles can block access to residences along the right-of-way. A set of pictures enclosed with his written report document the need for remedial action. He said that the Public Works Department had an important role in fire and safety protection.

Robert Pollock reported on the Transient Room Tax committee, and expressed his appreciation for the help Gary Albright provided the committee. He presented a sample list of terms and conditions for use of the TRT money, and a draft application for use of TRT funds. He said the committee is developing a pamphlet to guide applications for funding.

The Council asked Sheriff Long whether the radar speed reader board was available for the City to use.

Public Works Superintendent Brian Bettis reported that water testing had been completed, and that the motor control center for the well electrical building is being assembled. He also reported work on the mixing zone study, and repairs to the wastewater collection system. Also, he said, the Department has patched and repaired streets through the town, and that a new striping machine has been purchased and put to use.

The Council approved submission of a loan request from the DEQ revolving fund to perform the mixing zone study.

The Council approved staff recommendation that Tillamook Complete Janitorial be awarded the contract for cleaning services.

The Council approved the recommendation of a special committee that the planning contract be awarded to Sabrina Pearson.

The Council approved Resolution #15-14 exempting the Tennis Court Resurfacing Contract from competitive bidding, and awarded the contract to Pacific Ace, LLC. Work is to commence July 15, and be completed by August 15, 2015.

The Council renewed its contract with Lois Albright as City Attorney for the next three years. Lois noted in her cover letter that there is no fee increase currently, but that it could rise by $20.00 per hour sometime during the life of the contract.

The Council noted that Harold Weber had written a check to the City to pay for a sewer connection in 2011, but did not connect as required by the City. Brian Bettis was instructed to contact Mr. Weber about the connection, and advise him that he could be subjected to a fine of $500 per day that the property remains unconnected.

The property had been annexed by the City several years ago. A problem is that a sewer connection would have to cross a vacant property for which there is no easement.

The Council took up the issue of insurance for rental of the hall. CIS, the City’s insurer, recommends the renters obtain $2 m insurance to rent the hall, regardless of whether alcohol is served. Until now, the City has required a renter to obtain $500k insurance only if liquor is to be served. The Boosters and VFW both use the hall regularly, and neither serves liquor. The Council deferred action to the August meeting.

The Council passed a resolution to apply for a Special Cities Allotment Grant of $50k, to repair heavily-trafficked Bewley Street.

Attorney Albright apprised the Council that Tammy Pierson, one of the children of Betty and Myron Curtis, wished to donate their property adjacent to U.S. 101 to the City instead of granting an easement to allow the City to install a culvert to alleviate a drainage problem. Albright said the title was presently “a bit of a mess.” She advised the Council that “this is in the works,” but it will take several months.

Planning Commission
The Planning Commission, at its July 15 meeting, recommended denial of a request from Greg Hublou to rezone the North High Intensity Zone to South High Intensity, so he could install a highway-oriented business, a drive-in or drive-through restaurant in the former Lupe’s restaurant building.

Granting of the requested rezoning would open Bay City’s downtown area to potential siting of a marijuana dispensary.

Tom Imhoff offered comments in opposition to the request, noting that what was being requested would be considered “spot zoning.”

Patrick Wingard of DLCD offered commentary on the “Rails and Trails” program getting underway in Tillamook and Washington Counties. He advised that in the fall each city would be receiving a set of amendments for inclusion in the Comprehensive Plan and Development Ordinance. The program is supported by ODOT, which has retained Parametrics to do the design work.

 

The Picnic that Wasn’t
Like many of you, I was disappointed to learn late last week that the annual Firefighter Community Picnic had been canceled. I spoke with Darrell about the matter. The Firefighter Association has a temporary restaurant license, Darrell said, and many of the members have food handler permits.

The problem was advertising the event as a “Community Potluck.” Health regulations forbid such events, since they are events open to the public. The food served as potluck is generally prepared in an uninspected home kitchen. This is OK when the potluck is confined to members of an organization, but not when outsiders partake.

I missed the picnic this year, because it has always been the highlight of my summer. Next year, perhaps, people will be advised to bring their own side dishes.

The Pearl Festival
Plans for the Pearl Festival are proceeding at light speed, or nearly so. Sara Charlton, who chairs the committee preparing for the event, reported to the City Council that participation this year is twice what it was last year.

The Festival will be held August 29, the last Saturday in August. This is one week earlier than last year, because scheduling on the first day of the Labor Day weekend offered too many conflicts.

Activities will start at 10 a.m., with a tour of the Kilchis Reserve, music and vendors in the park and a Boosters Club rummage sale in The Landing parking lot.

Vendors will be located on the tennis courts, and the music will be located on a flatbed trailer west of the tennis court. Musical groups appearing this year include Tics Marimba Band, Two Crow, Ocean Bottom Country Blues Band, Eric Singleton, Joe Wrabek, the Gospel Trio, and the Bay City Rockers.

The parade starts at 11, and proceeds from the Fire Station to Main Street, east on Main Street to 5th, south on Fifth to B Street, and back to the Fire Station. There may be a change in the route to make for a slightly longer parade, but that is being negotiated.

Brand new this year is a Pet Parade, with a trophy to be presented, but the committee hasn’t agreed on a category yet.

The Bay City Arts Center will have a display of photos of old Bay City, most of which has burned to the ground.

Supporters this year include the Bay City Arts Center, the Pioneer Museum, the Tillamook County Library and Pacific Seafood.

If you are an artist or a vendor, or would like to be in the parade, please check Facebook: The Bay City Festival of Pearls, or email pearlfestival@earthlink.net.

Forms are also available at the Bay City Office and the Bay City Library.

While the Pearl Festival is receiving TRT money to help defray the expense of putting it on, the amount received is not enough. Many have contributed money for the event, and contributions are most welcome. If you would like to contribute, write a check to the Bay City Arts Center and mark it as a contribution to support the Pearl. You’ll be glad you did.

Stay tuned for more events, as plans continue to develop.

Bay City Boosters
The Boosters closed their season with a “picnic” May 29. The picnic, originally set for the park, was held at the Ad Montgomery Community Hall. It was a bit cool, and weather was a bit uncertain, so they erred on the safe side.

There will be no meetings during the summer. The Boosters will meet again at noon on Friday, Sept. 25.

Dog Licenses
Dog licenses are due for renewal, and may be obtained at the City Office. Cost will depend upon the sex or neutered status of the dog, and age of the owner. You must present proof of current rabies vaccination.

Reservations for the DAV Van
County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service

County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office
Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity
VFW Post 2848 met Thursday, July 18, at 6 p.m. The Vets Day Planning Committee met that morning at the Tillamook Naval Air Station Museum (new name) at 10 a.m.

The Post has been having a very busy summer. We participated in the June Dairy Parade, followed in a few days by the Rockaway Beach Fourth of July parade. On July 25, the post will have its “combat vehicle” in the Garibaldi Days parade.

The post will also share space with Tillamook Soil and Water at the County Fair, as it did last year, thanks to Rudy Fenk. A year ago Rudy offered the Post a place in its display area, for which the post thanks Rudy and Tillamook Soil and Water most sincerely.

On August 29, the post and auxiliary will ride in the Bay City Pearl Festival parade.

Worn Flags
I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

A week ago, Jim Allenbrand, our VFW Post Commander, and I stopped by Five Rivers to pick up 20 worn flags. Later in the year, the post will assist the Boy Scouts in a respectful flag retirement ceremony. I’ll let you know how it goes.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace
Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Bay City Arts Center
Artist of the Month for the Month of July is Carol Winters, who is displaying her beautifully detailed drawings. The public is welcome to view Carol’s art Tuesday through Thursday, between 9:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.

August 1 and 2 will feature another Discovery in Stone workshop from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days. It is open to all ages and all experience levels. The class is open house style instruction, with teachers and experienced stone carvers on hand to answer questions. Tools are available for use and purchase. The workshop is by donation, and feel free to bring food to share during the lunch hour.

On August 8 the BCAC will be washing cars at the Tillamook PUD as a fundraiser to support kids’ art programs. BCAC needs youth, ages 13 and older, to help wash the trucks from 8:30 a.m. to noon. If you are interested in participating, please contact the BCAC office at (503) 377-9620.

August 14 to 16, BCAC will host “Evening Gloves,” an original play by Helen Hill. The show will feature local actors and actresses, and proceeds from the event will support Helping Hands in their efforts to open a homeless shelter in Tillamook. August 14 and 15, there will be a soup and bread dinner at 6 p.m., followed by the play at 7 p.m. On August 16, there will be a matinee performance at NCRD at 3 p.m. All shows and dinners are at a suggested donation of $25.

August 16 will feature BCAC’s monthly pancake breakfast, 8 a.m. to noon, all you can eat for $5.

August 24 to 28, BCAC will host a week-long Krafty Kidz art camp for ages 10 to 14. Camp runs M-F from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuition is $50 for the week, and includes lunch. Scholarships are available. Participants will create an array of art work. For more information or to register, call Leaunna in the BCAC office, (503) 377-9620. Pre-registration is required for the camp.

BCAC, in partnership with Latimer Quilt and Textile Center, will host a Coop art booth at the Tillamook Farmers’ Market. If you would like to participate, please contact Leeauna Perry at (503) 377-9620. The cost is $15 per day, and the artists keep their sales proceeds. All items to be sold must be adjudicated in advance, according to market regulations. Remaining available dates during the summer are August 29 and September 19.

August 29, BCAC will host the Pearl Festival again this year from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Join us for a day of fun, music, art and more in downtown Bay City. For artists, BCAC has space for vendors inside the building. Cost for booth space is $10. Contact BCAC to reserve your space.

BCAC is compiling a list of music teachers who actively provide individual instrument and voice instruction throughout Tillamook County. Instructors will be screened and contact information will be collected and consolidated. The list will be provided to persons interested in furthering their music education. Teachers interested in participating as part of the Tillamook County Music Teachers Network should contact the BCAC office and ask for Leeaunna, (503) 377-9620.

BCAC is getting its Toddler Art program back up and running. Contact Leeauna at the BCAC office for more details.

Drop-in yoga classes are held Monday and Thursday afternoons at 4 p.m. Cost is $5 per class.

Musicians also wanted! BCAC wishes to start a community symphony orchestra, and is seeking interested and experienced musicians to learn and perform intermediate level music. If you are interested, contact the BCAC office.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The email address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad
Summer is here, and the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad is in full swing, offering its daily round trips from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach, plus some longer excursions.

There will be three daily departures, from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach, through Labor Day. The train departs Garibaldi at 10 a.m., 12 noon and 2 p.m.

Costs of these round trips are: Adults --- $18; Seniors, 62+ --- $17; Children, 3--10, $10; and locomotive cab rides go for $50.

The Oregon Coast Crawler will make its fall foliage trip to Salmonberry, with its photo runbys, false starts, and all sorts of other fun things.

The fall foliage trip to Salmonberry will take place this year on October 3, and the cost of the trip will be $125 per person. I will publish more on the trip to Salmonberry in a later issue. But one word of caution. This trip may be a sell-out, and the smart money would suggest that you make your reservations earlier rather than later to avoid being disappointed. Only 120 passengers can be accommodated.

For information, call (503) 292-5055.

Bits and Pieces
Not much to add to what has gone before.

My sister is safely back in Tennessee, and life has returned to normal.

Our deer, which had been hanging around through most of the visit, seem to have found other haunts. Occasionally, I’ve seen one lone doe lounging in a protected corner of my property. But I can see that they have been drinking my water, in a little container I set out for them.

They’re still around, just trying not to be seen.

 

June 16, 2015

BAY CITY, June 16, 2015 --- Lots of action at the City Council this issue. But the best part of the City Council meeting came from City Engineer Steve Donovan, who commented that Bay City, for a city its size, is very well managed. He suggested that the reason for our excellence of administration was likely because we didn’t have a city manager getting in to things.

T.J. Robinette Fundraiser
Young T.J.’s March 14 fundraiser went very well, and the people opened their pocketbooks for him big time.

But the need continues, and will for some time. He will require much reconstructive surgery for his injuries, An account, the Robinette Family Fund, is still open for donations at Umpqua Bank. Maybe that would be a good place for that tax refund you were trying to figure out how to spend.

His mom Heather, told Sharline and me that T.J. is at home now, and doing well for what he’s been through. He will require more reconstructive surgery, so the need continues.

Burning Season
This is a Heads Up to warn you that back yard burning may end very soon this year. Darrell Griffith, Bay City’s fire chief, announced at the June 9 meeting of the City Council that the season could end as soon as June 14. So, the smart money says that if you have some material that needs to be burned, do it sooner rather than later. Today’s forecast in The Oregonian shows no sign of moisture for the next week, and Sunday is forecast to be sunny and warm.

City Park Improvement Fund
When you visit the City Office, you’ll notice a contribution jar sitting on the main counter. That is for funds to help support the park.

Jackson Morris came up with the idea to solicit contributions to help with improvements to the Al Griffin Memorial Park. The park still needs to complete the tennis and basketball court and make other improvements. There is grant money to do some of this, but grant funds need to be matched.

Today I showed my visiting sister and brother-in-law our Griffin Memorial Park and they were absolutely amazed that a small city like ours should have such a beautiful park. And, that’s very true. We have a park of which we can be truly proud.

So, next time you’re in the City Office, drop a buck or two into the jar. You’ll be glad you did.

City Council
The City Council held its monthly meeting June 9, when it dealt with all the things that must be dealt with at the start of a new fiscal year.

First order of business, however, was the second reading and passage of the text amendments to the Development Ordinance and Comprehensive Plan. There was no further discussion or amendments, and the amendments were approved unanimously. There is an emergency clause, so the amendments take effect immediately.

The City had exercised its option to declare a moratorium on establishment of medical marijuana dispensaries until May 1. We are a bit overdue, but better late than never, they say.

The Council adopted Ordinance 664, which refines previous language governing noise, smoking, possession and use of alcohol in City parks. Smoking is prohibited at all times in the vicinity of children’s playgrounds.

The Council adopted Ordinance 665, which refines language defining the Fire Department and the Bay City Firefighters’ Association.

The Council also adopted the resolutions associated with the start of the new fiscal year on July 1. Resolution 15-02 approves the City’s participation in the State Revenue Sharing Program.

The most important of the resolutions is Resolution 15-03, which adopts the budget and levies taxes for the new fiscal year. Total budget for the 2015-2016 fiscal year is $4,373,522. Taxes will be $1.5375 per $1,000 of assessed value for operations; $.46 per $1,000 of assessed value for Public Safety Protection Local Option Tax, and the amount of $47,316 for bonds. A copy of the budget is available for review at the City Office.

Several years ago, the City adopted a resolution to adjust water and sewer rates according to the Portland Cost of Living Index for the second half of its fiscal year. Previously, the City had been adjusting water and sewer rates infrequently, with resulting overly large increases at each adjustment. Consumer Price Index for the Portland area during the second half of 2014 was 2.03 percent.

This year, there is one additional consideration. The City is required to perform a wastewater mixing zone study, and develop a 20-year wastewater facilities plan. The mixing zone study will cost the City $190 thousand dollars, which the City plans to borrow from the DEQ revolving loan fund, to be repaid over a period of five years at an interest rate of .88 percent. In practical terms, this would add $4.50 per month to a residential water/sewer bill.

Resolution 15-04 adjusts sewer rates, connection charges, system development charges and sewer surcharges effective July 1, 2015. Resolution 15-05 does the same for water bills. The water bill contains an additional charge of $5 to pay for street maintenance and repair. The total bill for sewer, water and street maintenance effective July 1 would be $71.98 for a single residence on a ¾ inch connection, as compared with $65.88 for the fiscal year just ending.

Back to the mixing zone study. DEQ Resolution 15-09 authorizes the mayor to contract with the Department of Environmental Quality to borrow $190 thousand to perform the mixing zone study; and Resolution 15-08 establishes a Debit Service Fund to collect money to repay the loan. That works out to $4.50 per Equivalent Dwelling Unit, or EDU, or, in plain language, Household.

Therefore, the total monthly bill for sewer and water will be $76.28 for a household, effective July 1. All resolutions are available at the City Office for review, and possibly on line as well. Cost for water use in excess of 6,000 gallons remains at $2.50 per 1,000 gallons or fraction thereof.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith reported 214 training and response hours for May. The Department responded to 11 calls, which included one automobile accident and five medical calls. Darrell, himself, put in an additional 95 hours attending meetings and performing other administrative tasks.

He also reported that recruiting of new members continues, and that the new engine has been placed in service. He also expressed concern over properties in which property owners have allowed large quantities of grass and brush to accumulate near houses. He also noted accumulation of vehicles, RVs and miscellaneous debris in the vicinity of houses, commenting that many of the vehicles carry a significant fuel load.

Brush, he added, is now tending to obscure fire hydrants and encroach onto roads.

The annual Fire Department Picnic is set for July 18, he concluded.

Public Works Superintendent Brian Bettis reported repair of three water leaks, two in the Latimer/Juno area, and one at Sixth and B Street..

He also reported that he is working on a Small Cities Allotment Grant to help repair Bay City Streets, and that ODOT is fixing ADA ramps in the sidewalk along U.S. 101.

He also reported that the Al Griffin Memorial Park campground is open, and that the fencing has been done at the Watt Family Park.

Under Unfinished Business, the Council discussed the draft Nuisance Ordinance, and set it for public hearing at the July 14 Council meeting. The draft contains a new provision to deal with “Chronic Nuisances,” which have plagued the City for many months.

The Council adopted Resolution 15-12, which will allow staff to allow credit for water consumed by unintentional water leaks.

The Council also adopted resolutions extending Workers’ Compensation coverage to volunteers; setting charges for search and reproduction of records requested by outside parties; and a resolution adopting various street and engineering standards on which the City had long relied but had never adopted as official City documents.

The Council also adopted Resolution 15-11, which exempts the City from obtaining competitive bidding and awards a contract for mowing of the City parks to North Coast Lawn.

The Council also awarded a contract to SHN Consulting Engineers and Geologists to provide engineering services on an as-needed basis, contract to expire June 30, 2017.

The Council also renewed the contract with Coastwide Readymix for removal of gravel from Dill Bar.

Mayor Peterson announced that the City had received three proposals each for Planning Consultant and Cleaning Services. Shaena named an ad hoc committee of three to review the Planning Consultant application and provide recommendations to the July Council meeting. The committee will include Council member Kari Fleisher, Planning Commissioner Phyllis Wustenberg and Leonard Brogden, with Tom Imhoff named as alternate in the event Brogden cannot serve. Shaena asked Staff to review the proposals for cleaning services.

The Council also approved a special contract with SHN to perform the Mixing Zone Study, and with North Coast Lawn for mowing the Griffin and Watt Family Parks. Monthly cost for mowing the two parks is $1,025.

There was considerable discussion of a proposal from CoastCom, Inc., regarding providing high-speed fiber optic cable service for the City Hall and Fire Station. The Council approved a resolution exempting the City from competitive bidding for extension of fiber optic cable to the Fire Station and City Hall at a cost of less than $5,000 for the initial connection, and less than $2,500 annually, and authorized the mayor to sign the contract.

Mayor Peterson announced that Senator Jeff Merkley would hold a Town Hall at the Officers’ Mess at the Tillamook Naval Air Station Saturday, June 20, at 1 p.m.

Bay City Boosters
The Boosters closed their season with a “picnic” May 29. The picnic, originally set for the park, was held at the Ad Montgomery Community Hall. It was a bit cool, and weather was a bit uncertain, so they erred on the safe side.

There will be no meetings during the summer. The Boosters will meet again at noon on Friday, Sept. 25.

Dog Licenses
Dog licenses are due for renewal, and may be obtained at the City Office. Cost will depend upon the sex or neutered status of the dog, and age of the owner. You must present proof of current rabies vaccination.

 

Reservations for the DAV Van
County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service
County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office
Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity
VFW Post 2848 will meet Thursday, June 18, at 6 p.m. The Vets Day Planning Committee will meet that morning at the Tillamook Naval Air Station Museum (new name) at 10 a.m.

The Post did very well with its poppy distribution at Fred Meyer over the Memorial Day weekend, and Post Commander Jim Allenbrand extends his sincere appreciation to Fred Meyer for their courtesy.

Worn Flags
I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace
Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Bay City Arts Center
Artist of the Month for the Month of June will be our own Helen Hill, with her amazing paintings of the Kilchis Point Reserve. The public is welcome to view Helen’s art Tuesday through Thursday, between 9:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.

June 13 and 14 featured another “Discovery in Stone” workshop. These workshops generally run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day, and are open to all ages and experience levels. Tools are available for use or purchase. Classes are open style instruction, with teachers and experienced stonecutters available to provide guidance and instruction. The workshops are by donation.

On June 20, BCAC, in partnership with Latimer Quilt and Textile Center, will host a Coop art booth at the Tillamook Farmers’ Market. If you would like to participate, please contact Leeauna Perry at (503) 377-9620. The cost is $15 per day, and the artists keep their sales proceeds. All items to be sold must be adjudicated in advance, according to market regulations. Other available dates during the summer are: July 18, August 29 and September 19.

June 20 will feature returning guest artist John Stowell for a workshop and concert. The workshop is at 1 p.m., and will cost $20. All levels are welcome, but it is recommended that you register in advance. Dinner is at 6:30, by donation, and the jazz concert starts at 7 p.m.

June 21 will feature BCAC’s monthly pancake breakfast, all you can eat for $5.

From June 22 through 26 BCAC will conduct its Beach Art Camp. The camp runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily, and is open to children ages 5 to 9 years. Tuition for the week is $50, or $12 per day. Lunch is included. Thanks to THS Charity Drive and Mudd Nick Foundation, scholarships are available. To register, call Leeauna at (503) 377-9620.

On June 26, BCAC is welcoming a representative from Helping Hands project for a dinner to support the development of a Homeless Shelter in Tillamook. Dinner starts at 5:30 p.m., with a show to follow at 7 p.m. Admission is $15.

July 11 is Monopoly Night at BCAC. Put on our most formal gear and join BCAC for an evening of Monopoly board game fun and an auction. Admission is only $10, which buys $1,500 BCAC Bucks to spend throughout the night. Monopoly Night is open only to those who have passed their 21st birthdays. Hors d’oeuvres and desserts are included in the cost of admission.

BCAC is compiling a list of music teachers who actively provide individual instrument and voice instruction throughout Tillamook County. Instructors will be screened and contact information will be collected and consolidated. The list will be provided to persons interested in furthering their music education. Teachers interested in participating as part of the Tillamook County Music Teachers Network should contact the BCAC office and ask for Leeaunna, (503) 377-9620.

BCAC is getting its Toddler Art program back up and running. Contact Leeauna at the BCAC office for more details.

Drop-in yoga classes are held Monday and Thursday afternoons at 4 p.m. Cost is $5 per class.

Musicians also wanted! BCAC wishes to start a community symphony orchestra, and is seeking interested and experienced musicians to learn and perform intermediate level music. If you are interested, contact the BCAC office.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The email address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad
Summer is here, and the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad is in full swing, offering its daily round trips from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach, plus some longer excursions.

As of June 14, there will be three daily departures, from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach, through Labor Day. The train departs Garibaldi at 10 a.m., 12 noon and 2 p.m.

Costs of these round trips are: Adults --- $18; Seniors, 62+ --- $17; Children, 3--10, $10; and locomotive cab rides go for $50.

The Oregon Coast Crawler will make its fall foliage trip to Salmonberry, with its photo runbys, false starts, and all sorts of other fun things.

The fall foliage trip to Salmonberry will take place this year on October 3, and the cost of the trip will be $125 per person. I will publish more on the trip to Salmonberry in a later issue. But one word of caution. This trip may be a sell-out, and the smart money would suggest that you make your reservations earlier rather than later to avoid being disappointed. Only 120 passengers can be accommodated.

For information, call (503) 292-5055.

Bits and Pieces
My sister and brother-in-law visited with us for most of last week. They arrived Sunday, June 7, and we enjoyed a nice meal together at Lin’s Chinese Restaurant. The following afternoon, our three daughters and our neighbors, the Olivers, joined us for a cookout and picnic on our front deck.

During most of the afternoon a lone deer rested in a well-screened corner of our yard. But then the critter went behind the house and disappeared from view. After our guests had departed, Betty Oliver called to tell us that the deer had given birth to a baby deer.

I have yet to see the little fellow, but Betty and Sharline have watched the little guy nursing on its mother. It’s amazing how those little critters know where to find mama’s milk faucet.

According to Betty, the little guy was pretty wobbly on its feet when it stood to follow mama after being born. But in more recent sightings, it seemed to be getting around pretty well. May the little fellow live long and prosper.

Sadly, my brother-in-law got sick on Tuesday, and he spent the next three days in bed at the motel. But my sister and I had a great visit. We all had breakfast together Friday, and then they headed to SeaTac Airport to catch their flight back to Knoxville, Tenn.

Before arriving here in Bay City, they had completed their fourth cruse up the Inside Passage in Alaska. It was a Princess Cruise.

 

May 25, 2015

BAY CITY, May 25, 2015 --- At last another issue of the Grapevine. This is a busy time of year for members of veterans’ organizations. We seem to get wrapped in more patriotic and fund-raising activities each year. We just finished with Memorial Day, and then comes the June Dairy Parade, the Rockaway Beach 4th of July parade, followed by the Garibaldi Days parade. And, our VFW Post and Auxiliary will participate in the Pearl Festival parade on August 29. That ought to keep us busy and out of trouble.

End of an Era
I was saddened when I picked up my mail May 11. Garibaldi Pharmacy would be closing its doors effective Friday, May 15. I had the pleasure of dealing with Garibaldi Pharmacy, and Leroy Godfrey, ever since my arrival in Bay City in 1994. Lee Godfrey always knew his customers’ needs and went out of his way to be of service.

Lee has always been extremely reliable, and when there was a problem with my pharmacy insurance, he always knew how to work it out. His staff was always friendly and very helpful.

But that is over. When I read the letter, I rounded up whatever prescriptions I had that needed refilling and phoned them in. I picked up my last refills from him on May 13. It marked the end of a wonderful relationship. I’ll be in the store in the future to pick up a few things, but I’ll certainly miss the pharmacy.

To Lee, my very best for a successful venture with whatever products you bring in to sell, and my thanks for the wonderful service you’ve provided me and my family during the 21 years I’ve relied upon you for my pharmacy needs.

Jake Robinette Fundraiser

Young Jake’s March 14 fundraiser went very well, and the people opened their pocketbooks for him big time.

But the need continues, and will for some time. Jake will require much reconstructive surgery for his injuries, An account, the Robinette Family Fund, is still open for donations at Umpqua Bank. Maybe that would be a good place for that tax refund you were trying to figure out how to spend.

City Council
The City Council held its monthly meeting May 12. The first item on the agenda was the Public Hearing on the text amendments to the Development Ordinance. Attorney Lois Albright was not happy with the additional Allowable Matrix term, Transient Housing, which she regarded as an “umbrella term” covering any and all types of transient lodging.

The definition which had been proposed following the April 19 Planning Commission Public Hearing was not appropriate for this “umbrella term.” Albright, however, suggested a different title, “Short Term Vacation Rental,” which fit the definition rather well.

Several Council members wanted time to review the proposed text amendments more carefully, so, after having the first reading by title only, the Public Hearing was continued to June 9 for further discussion and probable adoption. When adopted, the changes would be effected immediately because of the emergency clause in the ordinance.

The emergency clause was necessary, because the City was required to have zoning in place for production and distribution of medical marijuana by May 1. When the changes become effective, medical and recreational marijuana dispensaries will be allowed in the South High Intensity Zone only, while facilities for production, processing and storing will be allowed only in the Low Intensity Zone.

The Council considered three other ordinances at the May meeting. Attorney Albright has drafted some changes to the Nuisance Ordinance to deal with “chronic violations” of the Nuisance Ordinance, defined as violations that occur more often than once within a 12-month period. Chronic violators will be subject to a civil penalty of $100 per day for every day a violation continues past the day abatement of the nuisance was supposed to be completed. The Council set a workshop to discuss the amended nuisance ordinance at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 27, 2015.

New Parks and Fire Department ordinances were also considered, and will be set for Public Hearing at a future date. There was discussion of smoking in the parks, whether or where smoking would be allowed.

Some upgrades for the City’s wastewater collection and treatment systems are under consideration. It is necessary to limit the amount of stormwater that leaks into the collection system, to avoid sewage overflows into the treatment ponds. Most likely source of funding to perform this Mixing Zone Study would be a no-interest loan from the DEQ.

In addition, sewer and water rates are now raised annually to keep up with rising costs. The Council, at its June 9 meeting, will consider the water and sewer rates to be effective in July. There may be a further increase in the sewer rate to set up a Debit Service Fund to accumulate funds to repay the loan for the Mixing Zone Study.

Work on Phase 1 of the Watt Family Park improvements should be completed this year. A fence is being constructed along the south border of the park, sewer and water lines are being installed, and the restroom and drinking fountain will be constructed. Phase 2, next year, will include improvement of the playing field.

It was discovered during the meeting that the City Public Works Standards for roads and other matters have never been officially adopted by the Council. This will be rectified at a future meeting of the City Council.

Planning Commission
The Planning Commission held its Public Hearing on the proposed text amendments to the Development Ordinance and Comprehensive Plan on April 29.

Two parties offered testimony at the public hearing, and there was an additional letter submitted, all of which were considered by the Planning Commission.

At the Public Hearing, City Planner Sabrina Pearson recommended two changes to the text amendments that the Commission and the city attorney had approved. One change recommended that a requirement for a first story minimum 12-foot height be removed as a requirement for requesting a 30-foot building height in the High Intensity Zone. Normal building height in 24 feet, but the Development Ordinance allows a 30-foot height for a valid need.

The other change recommended the addition of another line to the Allowable Use Matrix: Transient Lodging.

Since the two changes were presented in a single motion, I voted against them, even though I favored elimination of the first story 12-foot height as a qualifier for having a 30-foot building height. The City Council held its Public Hearing on the changes at its meeting May 12.

On May 20 the Planning Commission held its regular May meeting. The one land use issue before the Commission was installation of miniature guest cottages and a nine-hole disc golf course on 2.7 acres of property in the Goose Point area.

This property is a nicely hidden meadow surrounded by tall trees, a truly beautiful place I had never known existed. The applicants for the project, Mark and Dee Harguth, already operate a small bed-and-breakfast on an adjacent property.

The Commission granted its approval with eight conditions. The applicants plan to have the buried utilities for the cabins in place this summer, and will finish the project in early- to mid-2016. The development will help reduce density in the Goose Point area, and serve as a perfect complement to the nearby Kilchis Point reserve.

Bay City Boosters
The next Boosters meeting will be at noon May 29, in the Al Griffin Memorial Park, weather permitting. It will be a picnic, and the fun begins at noon in the picnic area. Members may bring their picnic items between 11:30 a.m. and noon. The Boosters Club is also requesting canned and non-perishable food items for the Food Bank.

Outdoor Burning
2015 burn permits are now available, at no charge, at the City office. If you have any burning to get done, I’d suggest you do so. It looks like we will have a serious fire situation this summer, and I would not be the least surprised to see burning restrictions imposed early this year. Don’t count on being able to barrel burn through July!

Dog Licenses
Dog licenses are due for renewal, and may be obtained at the City Office. Cost will depend upon the sex or neutered status of the dog, and age of the owner. You must present proof of current rabies vaccination.

Reservations for the DAV Van
County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

 

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service
County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office
Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity

VFW Post 2848 met Thursday, May 21, at 6 p.m.

The post was fully committed to Memorial Day activities again this year. We raised the colors over the Idaville Pioneer Cemetery on Friday, May 22. The Post is also distributing Buddy Poppies at Fred Meyer, to raise money for our Relief Fund, Friday through Sunday. The Ladies’ Auxiliary is distributing their poppies at the Cheese Factory this year, Saturday through Monday.

On Monday, Memorial Day, the post participated in the Sunset Gardens ceremony, with our Service Officer, Col. Bill Hatton, USMCR, Ret., as the MC. The program started at 11 a.m.

On Tuesday, the post and Auxiliary will pick up the graveside flags that were set out at the graves of veterans last Friday.

In other activity, the Post participated in a flag raising ceremony at the Five Rivers Retirement and Assisted Living Center. We plan to assist Five Rivers with a flag exchange they plan to hold in the near future. People who bring in worn flags will be given new ones. The post will dispose of the worn flags in a respectful manner.

The next meeting of the post will be June 18, 2015, 6 p.m. at the Ad Montgomery Community Hall.

Worn Flags
I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace
Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Bay City Arts Center
Artists of the Month for the month of May were students at East Elementary School. I don’t yet know who the Artist of the Month for June will be.

June 13 and 14 will feature another “Discovery in Stone” workshop. The workshop will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day, and is open to all ages and experience levels. Tools will be available for use or purchase. Classes will be open style instruction, with teachers and experienced stone cutters available to provide guidance and instruction. The workshop is by donation.

June 21 will feature BCAC’s monthly pancake breakfast, all you can eat for $5.

The Bay City Arts Center will partner with the Latimer Quilt and Textile Center to host co-op art sales at the Farmers’ Market, one time each month. Contact Leauna at the office, (503) 377-9620 for more information.

BCAC is compiling a list of music teachers who actively provide individual instrument and voice instruction throughout Tillamook County. Instructors will be screened and contact information will be collected and consolidated. The list will be provided to persons interested in furthering their music education. Teachers interested in participating as part of the Tillamook County Music Teachers Network should contact the BCAC office and ask for Leeaunna, (503) 377-9620.

BCAC is getting its Toddler Art program back up and running. Contact Leeauna at the BCAC office for more details.

Drop-in yoga classes are held Monday and Thursday afternoons at 4 p.m. Cost is $5 per class.

Musicians also wanted! BCAC wishes to start a community symphony orchestra, and is seeking interested and experienced musicians to learn and perform intermediate level music. If you are interested, contact the BCAC office.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The email address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad
Summer is getting closer, and the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad will soon be back in action, offering its round trips from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach, plus some longer excursions. We’ll talk about that in a later issue of the Back Fence.

The Oregon Coast Crawler will make its fall foliage trip to Salmonberry, with its photo runbys, false starts, and all sorts of other fun things.

The fall foliage trip to Salmonberry will take place this year on October 3, and the cost of the trip will be $125 per person. I will publish more on the trip to Salmonberry in a later issue. But one word of caution. This trip may be a sell-out, and the smart money would suggest that you make your reservations earlier rather than later to avoid being disappointed. Only 120 passengers can be accommodated.

For information, call (503) 292-5055.

Bits and Pieces
My neighbors, Jim and Betty Oliver, have returned from their winter haunts. Bob and Donna Miles are also back from the Islands. Chuck Bartholet came back early this year. He told me it just got too hot for him.

Out deer seem to be including our yard in their regular itinerary throughout Bay City. We’ve had six deer quite regularly, and one day last week, there were seven. I think they must like our grass.

Whatever they like, Sharline and I enjoy having them. Soon the blackberries will be ready, and the deer just love them --- not only the berries, but also the tender new shoots.

 

 

April 21, 2015

BAY CITY, April 21, 2015-- Better late than never, they say. Here I am, for better or for worse. All the news that’s fit to print, and maybe even some that’s not.

Jake Robinette Fundraiser
Young Jake’s March 14 fundraiser went very well, and the people opened their pocketbooks for him big time.

But the need continues, and will for some time. Jake will require much reconstructive surgery for his injuries, An account, the Robinette Family Fund, is still open for donations at Umpqua Bank. Maybe that would be a good place for that tax refund you were trying to figure out how to spend.

City Council
Several years ago, Joanne Schaeffer lodged a complaint alleging that Robin Weber and Wendy Schink were using the undeveloped 8th Street right-of-way east of her property to store personal property and install a raised garden bed.

The matter had been referred to the Planning Commission and the Public Works Superintendent to recommend a policy on use of undeveloped rights-of-way. In January 2015, the City Council determined that there would be no structures in public rights-of-way, but, in a letter to Schaeffer dated January 23, chose “not to regulate plants of any kind.”

The Council heard arguments by both parties at its March meeting, deferring further action until the April 14 meeting.

Attorney Lois Albright had drafted an ordinance on use of undeveloped rights-of-way for consideration by the Council, but advised that Oregon Revised Statutes and Administrative Rules are sufficient to govern such use.

Attorney Albright advised the Council that any encroachment use of a public right-of-way required a license. She cited other examples within Bay City, which include a slip-n-slide which the property owners had to remove, and a handicapped entrance for which the City granted an encroachment license.

It was also noted that the City’s enforcement of nuisance or violation abatement is complaint-driven, since the City has no police force, and that there are other right-of-way violations in the City which have not been the subject of complaint.

Dave Olson recommended that the planter box be removed, and Kathleen Baker offered a motion to that effect, allowing Robin Weber and Wendy Schink 30 days to accomplish the removal. Motion carried, with two Council members voting No.

Joanne Schaeffer again asked the Council about her letter about the plants, which the City has elected not to regulate.

Attorney Albright advised, that since the matter was an inquiry and not a complaint, she was not going to issue a generalized statement on plants and plantings.

Mayor Peterson asserted that there is no private use of public rights-of-way, and Attorney Albright added that the City will address the issue of plants if and when the City has to use the right-of-way.

Mayor Peterson removed the item from the Council agenda, stating, “The issue has been decided.”

Becky Smith, who co-owns the Yurt on the bay front, appeared before the Council to protest the Council’s having committed Transient Room Tax (TRT) dollars to fund the Pearl Festival without receiving a recommendation from the businesses that generate the tax dollars. She felt that a committee should be formed to recommend how the TRT money should be spent.

Mayor Shaena Peterson advised that such a committee was in the process of being formed, and that the committee would recommend how the money should be used.

Councilor Robert Pollock advised Becky that the committee would pass its recommendations on to the Council. Becky asked to be informed as soon as the Council decides how the TRT money is to be spent. It should be noted that the Budget Committee will hold its first meeting April 28.

Dianne Griffin told the Council that the Bay City Boosters had obtained a grant of $6,900 from Tillamook P.U.D. to install the necessary wiring in the Red Rock Beautification Area to provide holiday lighting.  It had long been a goal of the Boosters to provide the City with holiday lights at the entrance to the City.

The problem now, Dianne explained, is that Tillamook P.U.D. will charge the Boosters a monthly electric bill of from $28 to $30 for the electric service. On behalf of the Boosters, she asked whether the City could assume responsibility for payment of the monthly bill, since the monthly payment would put a strain on the Boosters’ finances.

Councilor Pollock moved that the City pay the monthly bill for electric service, which passed. Dianne thanked the Council and advised that the Boosters would begin raising funds to purchase holiday lights for the Red Rock area.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith advised the Council that he was in receipt of a new requirement for background checks on volunteer firefighters, which include submitting fingerprints. He stated that the cost of complying with this requirement was prohibitive and onerous for a volunteer fire department.

He stated that this requirement should apply only to paid fire departments, and not to volunteer firefighters.

 Under Community Development, Councilor Pollock advised that he would have a report from the TRT Committee for the May Council meeting.

Attorney Albright presented a draft revision of the Nuisance Ordinance to deal with “Chronic Nuisances” and to allow the City to impose civil fines as an alternative to referral to Justice Court. The draft defines a Chronic Nuisance as, “Any condition which results in two or more initial letters from the City for a substantially similar violation on the same property within any 12 month period.”

Mayor Peterson set the draft ordinance revision for public hearing in June.

In reviewing the Parks Ordinance, several Council members made the suggestion that the City designate areas in the parks where smoking is permitted.

City Engineer Steve Donovan spoke to the Council about obtaining a DEQ Planning Loan to perform a mixing zone study for the City’s wastewater treatment system. He advised that the loan would carry a zero percent interest rate, and that the five-year payback does not begin until the planning documents are completed, in approximately two years. He recommended several strategies to the City for repayment of the planning loan.

Steve noted that Bay City’s discharge of treated wastewater into an estuary makes the performance standards much tighter. He suggested tightening up the inflow and infiltration into the wastewater collection system would prevent so much water from reaching the treatment plant.

Donnie Miller, who operates the wastewater plant, noted that the City is constantly repairing the collection system, noting that when one leak is fixed, another springs up.

Jackson Morris suggested that the City raise funds to help with the parks by setting out collection boxes for park contributions.

The Council adopted Resolution 15-01, exempting the City from competitive bidding for cleaning services, authorizing City staff to solicit bids or quotes based upon the City’s Request for Proposals for cleaning services.

Fire Chief Griffith recommended certain revisions to the Fire Department Ordinance, and recommended that reference to Oregon DPSST be removed from the ordinance, and that the fire chief’s stipend be stated “as per contract.” Darrell is asking for $1,200 monthly for the next budget year.

The Council approved a Watt Family Park field use agreement for the YMCA, to include spring and fall seasons.

Public Works Superintendent Brian Bettis noted, in response to a comment about a baseball diamond, that upgrading the sports playing field would be included in Phase 2 of the Oregon Parks and Recreation grant process.

Under Mayor’s Presentation, Shaena Peterson noted that she helped promote the Kilchis Point Reserve very successfully, since more than one thousand visitors came to the Reserve over a single weekend, after hearing comments by Grant McOmie.

Shaena also announced that she would march in this year’s Grand Floral Parade on June 6, and that she would promote Bay City’s Pearl Festival in August.

Shaena also said she would seek an EPA grant to do a “Brownfield Assessment” of the Port of Tillamook Bay Railroad right-of-way, and would speak with Gary Albright, Pioneer Museum Director, about improving access to the Kilchis Point Reserve.

She added that she would discuss a railroad station to serve the Kilchis Point Reserve.

In the Attorney’s Presentation, Lois Albright reminded the Council that the City had adopted a policy against vacating street rights-of-way. A major reason, she stated, was to preserve areas for utilities and drainage ways needed for the City.

Lois reminded the Council that the Planning Commission would hold its public hearing on revisions to the Comprehensive Plan and Development Ordinance on April 29.

Planning Commission
The Planning Commission met April 15. The Commission accepted the resignation of Fred Rigwood, who had moved out of the City and was no longer eligible to serve.

Gary Albright, Pioneer Museum Director, presented his annual report on progress toward completion of the Kilchis Point Reserve, which is required as a part of the conditional use the Pioneer Museum was granted several years ago.

Phyllis Wustenberg, who serves on the Pioneer Museum Board, recused herself from participation.

The Planning Commission approved continuation of the conditional use with the added condition that the Museum prepare a plan for parking and access to the museum property.

The Commission approved the proposed text amendments to the Comprehensive Plan and Development Ordinance for public hearing, to be held in the Ad Montgomery Community Hall at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 29.

The proposed amendments would allow marijuana dispensaries in the South High Intensity Zone; marijuana growing, processing and storage sites would be restricted to the Low Intensity Zone.

Other amendments would eliminate loopholes that would permit certain large scale developments without Planning Commission approval, and establish a Shoreland 3 Zone in Moderate and High Intensity zones lying west of U.S. 101.

 

Bay City Boosters
The next Boosters meeting will be at noon April 24. Members may bring their potluck and auction items at 11:30 a.m. The Boosters Club is also requesting canned and non-perishable food items for the Food Bank.

Outdoor Burning
2015 burn permits are now available, at no charge, at the City office.

Dog Licenses
Dog licenses are due for renewal, and may be obtained at the City Office. Cost will depend upon the sex or neutered status of the dog, and age of the owner. You must present proof of current rabies vaccination.

Reservations for the DAV Van
County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service
County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office
Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity
VFW Post 2848 met Thursday, April 16, at 6 p.m.

Members of the Veterans Day Planning Committee met at the U.S. Naval Air Station Museum the morning of April 16 to get planning for this year’s program underway.

Theme for this year’s program will be Medical Personnel who have served their country in whatever capacity, be it as a doctor, nurse, or field medic or hospital corpsman.

Members of the VFW post will raise the flag at Five Rivers Retirement Center on Tuesday, April 21.

The next meeting of the post will be April 16, 2015, 6 p.m. at the Ad Montgomery Community Hall.

Worn Flags
I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace
Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Bay City Arts Center
Artist of the Month for the month of April will be art students at Tillamook High School. A reception for them was held April 10.

May 17 will feature BCAC’s monthly pancake breakfast, all you can eat for $5.

On April 23, the Women’s Resource Center will host “A Night of Reflection” from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Bay City Arts Center. This is a free event open to the public. April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and this event will provide the community with the opportunity to hear survivor stories of hope and healing, to view local art, and listen to music. Food will also be provided. For more information, contact Romy at (503) 842-8294, ext. 209, or romy@tcwrc.net.

BCAC is compiling a list of music teachers who actively provide individual instrument and voice instruction throughout Tillamook County. Instructors will be screened and contact information will be collected and consolidated. The list will be provided to persons interested in furthering their music education. Teachers interested in participating as part of the Tillamook County Music Teachers Network should contact the BCAC office and ask for Leeaunna, (503) 377-9620.

The Tillamook County Pioneer Museum will display the works of Helen Hill until May 8. During the past year, Helen has made pictures of the Kilchis Point Reserve and its many beautiful features.

BCAC is getting its Toddler Art program back up and running. Contact Leeauna at the BCAC office for more details.

Drop-in yoga classes are held Monday and Thursday afternoons at 4 p.m. Cost is $5 per class.

Musicians also wanted! BCAC wishes to start a community symphony orchestra, and is seeking interested and experienced musicians to learn and perform intermediate level music. If you are interested, contact the BCAC office.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The email address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad
Summer is getting closer, and the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad will soon be back in action, offering its round trips from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach, plus some longer excursions. We’ll talk about that in a later issue of the Back Fence.

The Oregon Coast Crawler will make its fall foliage trip to Salmonberry, with its photo runbys, false starts, and all sorts of other fun things.

The fall foliage trip to Salmonberry will take place this year on October 3, and the cost of the trip will be $125 per person. I will publish more on the trip to Salmonberry in a later issue. But one word of caution. This trip may be a sell-out, and the smart money would suggest that you make your reservations earlier rather than later to avoid being disappointed. Only 120 passengers can be accommodated.

For information, call (503) 292-5055.

Bits and Pieces
I’m happy to report that our deer have been back. It’s been a while. When I went out this morning to get my paper, there were three of the critters in my yard. When I returned, one small deer was crossing 8th Street in front of me. It stopped and looked at me, then ambled along to the other side of the street.

And, several days ago, the day I finally mowed, there were four deer eating my grass. Too bad they weren’t goats, which would have eaten all of the grass.

When I started to mow, they grudgingly got up and moved across the street to my neighbor’s property. They stuck around quite a while, in spite of the noise, but finally left for quieter surroundings.

I was pleased to see Chuck Bartholet back from his winter digs in Arizona. He said it got too hot for him down there, so he decided to come back to our cool, moist Oregon coastal environment. He told me it was 96 the day he left. I’d say a little of that goes a very long way.

 

April 8, 2015

BAY CITY, April 8, 2015 --- I’m back! Actually I never left, but I wasn’t able to publish my Back Fence during the month of March. Too much happening for an old man, as you will see when you read what follows.

Jake Robinette Fundraiser
I believe it was in late February when I ran into Helen Wright at the post office. She was home early from her winter digs. I learned a day or so later that she had returned early because of a family emergency.

I was shocked to learn that the emergency was the severe burns suffered by her great grandson, Jake Robinette. Sharline and I know his mother, Heather Robinette, very well, as she cuts our hair every so often. Actually, we should avail ourselves of her tonsorial services a bit more often.

Young Jake wound up at Legacy Emanuel Hospital in Portland, in the burn unit. He was stabilized over the first few days, and underwent the first of many reconstructive surgeries. He has had several more since then, and there will be more over the coming months --- years, possibly.

Helen put together a fundraiser for young Jake to help defray the cost of his hospitalization and surgeries, expected to total in six figures when it is all through.

Sadly, Helen had an accident at home, and wound up in Legacy Emanuel Hospital, just four doors down the hall from young Jake. So, Helen was not available to conduct the fundraiser for Jake, set for Saturday, March 14.

That job fell to Pat Vining, for whom cooking and mass feeding has become second nature after his many years as chef and wine steward at an upscale fishing and hunting camp in Alaska. He spent much of the day March 13 cooking spaghetti in the Ad Montgomery Community Hall kitchen.

All the food was contributed by The Landing, Helen’s restaurant and lounge. Pat told me after the event was over, that he ran out of food three times.

No head count was obtained, but the crowds just kept coming in. Sharline and I got there right at four, when the event began. When we left at five, the line was out to the street. Dinner was served until seven p.m.

Pat told me that he went through 31 pounds of spaghetti and 840 ounces of spaghetti sauce, and that the event took in about $8 thousand.

The food was certainly great, a tribute to Pat’s culinary expertise. Sharline had meat sauce with her dinner, while I had the vegetarian sauce. Both were outstanding. And there was a third sauce available for anyone wanting to try it --- a very spicy spaghetti sauce. (When I was in Iceland, I was the spaghetti chef for our little cooking group in the B.O.Q. We called ourselves “Col. Fearson’s Fearsome Fivesome.” I made very hot spaghetti sauce, and always tested it on the guy in the next room. If his forehead broke out in a sweat after a bite or so, we knew it was plenty hot.)

In addition to the dinner, there was a silent auction, with lots of items on the block. The most significant auction items were two motorcycles. No bids were submitted on them at the dinner, but the contributors said they would sell them and contribute the money.

If you missed the fundraiser, you may still make a contribution. A fund has been established at the Umpqua Bank. All you need do is go to an Umpqua Bank branch and give them a check made out to the Robinette Family Fund.

I’m happy to report that Helen has been moved from the hospital to a rehabilitation center where she will continue to recover from her injury. And, I was told by Trina when she cut my hair a few days ago, that Jake is doing OK. But he has a way to go, and the family will need lots of help. Please be generous.

A Loss for Everyone
I was saddened to learn of the unexpected passing of Nehalem mayor Shirley Kalkhoven.

Mayor Kalkhoven was a strong supporter for veterans, and for the Veterans Day Program VFW Post 2848 has put on for about 18 years. Following our 2013 Veterans Day event at the Tillamook Air Museum, mayor Kalkhoven contacted me to express her disappointment that more of the county’s mayors had not attended the program, and promised that she would try to get more mayors to attend the 2014 event.

And, we did indeed have a better representation by the county’s mayors at the 2014 event, which was held at Tillamook High School. The last time I saw her was at that event. We chatted briefly and exchanged good wishes for the coming holiday season.

Shirley, you will be sorely missed.

Bay City Arts Center Anniversary
I am pleased to congratulate the Bay City Arts Center on its 15th anniversary, celebrated March 21 with a gala anniversary party. Sadly, I was not able to publish in time to let you know in advance, and I was not able to attend the event.

Dinner began at 5:30 in the evening, followed by music by a number of local musicians and a dance performance by Dance Zone at 6:30 p.m.

Helen Hill and Charlie Wooldridge had moved to Tillamook County about the turn of the century. Helen told me, in an interview I was doing at the time for the Tillamook Headlight-Herald newspaper, that she and Charlie had spotted the iconic Masonic Hall, which would be ideally suited for her aspirations.

She acquired the old building and opened the Bay City Arts Center, a place that would promote and encourage all forms of local art. Helen had a real talent to relate to children, and it was not long before she had obtained grant funding to support after-school art classes for youngsters.

Soon she had expanded to summer nature and art camps for youngsters, beach camps, and a whole variety of projects for children. For the adults, she initiated the Artist of the Month program, in which an artist, or a group of artists, would display their work for a month following an initial reception.

Soon, the Bay City Arts Center Association was formed, officers elected, and Arts Center programs expanded. For a long time, the Arts Center had a garden, where children could plant and cultivate their own garden plots and grow crops, from seed to harvest.

During the great storm of December 2007, the Arts Center opened a warming center, where people could come out of the cold and get some nice, hot soup.

The Arts Center has been an active partner with the City of Bay City on many projects. Not long after its organization, Helen and Charlie arranged, through a grant partnership with the City of Bay City, to have City Repair of Oregon participate in a visioning program for the City. After a series of public meetings, City Repair constructed a model of downtown Bay City incorporating the City’s visions for the future.

The Arts Center has also participated in programs to improve the Al Griffin Memorial Park. The Arts Center also participated in the Bay City Centennial Celebration in 2010, and in the Pearl Festival in 2014. And they will be partners in the 2015 celebration as well.

Since its organization, the Arts Center has held monthly pancake breakfasts, all you can eat, for a very nominal cost. There has been a variety of weekly programs, including Toddler Art, Yoga and other programs over the years.

Helen, a gifted playwright, has written and produced several plays at the Arts Center. The first play presented in Bay City concerned the KKK in Tillamook County during the 1920s, and the branding of a woman “polite” society considered to be undesirable. Her most recent offering was the “Train Station Trilogy,” a Hawkingesque production speculating on the true nature of time, itself.

And, I should mention opera. The Arts Center has brought Portland Opera’s Opera Workshop to Bay City several times. This is a group that tours schools and presents scaled-down versions of operas for children. In Bay City, the kids helped out in a performance of Mozart’s “The Magic Flute.” The group also presented Puccini’s “La Boheme.” In addition, the Arts Center presented several sessions with the North Coast Symphony Orchestra.

In short, the Bay City Arts Center has enriched our town in ways nobody would ever have imagined before it began 15 years ago. I only wonder what the Arts Center will bring us during the next 15 years.

My sincerest thanks to Helen and Charlie, and the Arts Center, for their exquisite contribution to our town.

Lightning-Fast Fiber Optic
Keith Grunberg, representing CoastCom, attended the February 8 City Council workshop to discuss the vast benefits afforded by fiber optic cable, as contrasted with the antiquated copper wire systems in place in most of the County. He pointed to the value of having not only the City, but also the major businesses connect at the same time, saving on initial installation costs.

Paul Levesque, Tillamook County Administrative Officer, was present at a special workshop held March 24, to tell Council members about Light Wave, a nonprofit fiber optic provider established about 2001 to serve Tillamook County.

Levesque, a member of the Light Wave Board, explained that Light Wave does not compete with the two other fiber optic organizations, CoastCom and CenturyLink, operating in Tillamook County.

Levesque described high-speed fiber optic cable as an economic driver capable of increasing business activity and bringing new businesses to Tillamook County. There would be some up-front cost, certainly, but in the end the existence of fiber optic will bring new business to the area, he stated.

Mayor Shaena Peterson is especially interested in being able to stream meetings of the City Council live and in real time, something that is not now possible. Levesque pointed out the advantages of fiber optic cable over standard copper wire in emergency communications. He noted that 95 percent of the cable is buried, less vulnerable to damage than wire strung from poles.

The City has yet to hear from CenturyLink, the third purveyor of fiber optic cable. However, Darrell Griffith pointed out to me several days later, that CenturyLink already has fiber optic cable through Bay City.

Stay tuned.

City Council
Several years ago, Joanne Schaeffer lodged a complaint alleging that Robin Weber and Wendy Schink were using the undeveloped 8th Street right-of-way east of her property to store personal property and install a raised garden bed.

The matter had been referred to the Planning Commission and the Public Works Superintendent to recommend a policy on use of undeveloped rights-of-way. In January 2015, the City Council determined that there would be no structures in public rights-of-way, but chose “not to regulate plants of any kind” in a letter to Schaeffer dated January 23, 2015.

Schaeffer responded, sending a letter asking for clarification of the definition of “plants or plantings,” and Weber/Schink sent a letter stating their refusal to remove the raised bed structure.

After hearing responses from both parties, the Council continued the 8th Street right-of-way complaint until the April meeting.

Mark Dunham made another appearance before the Council to seek a solution to his inability to locate his satellite antenna where it would actually receive a signal. He suggested the possibility of cutting down several trees in the undeveloped right-of-way, but that was quickly nixed when it was pointed out that cutting several trees from a grove could weaken the remaining trees, leading to blow-downs. Pat Vining added that removing the trees could violate the City’s engineered stormwater runoff plan.

Fire Chief Darrell Griffith reported that he had received revised certification forms for new firefighters, requiring that they be fingerprinted and have background checks. Just rolling the prints would cost $47 for each new member, and the cost of the background checks would be prohibitive. Turnover among volunteer firefighters is high, Darrell explained, because most have jobs and many move out of the area to accept new employment. The mayor asked Darrell to draft a letter seeking exemption, noting that she would see that Sen. Betsy Johnson receives a copy when she is interviewed on the radio the following week.

Darrell also announced that the annual firefighter picnic would take place July 18, in view of the Pearl Festival taking place the end of August. He sought and received the Council’s permission to close 4th Street for that event.

Public Works Superintendent Brian Bettis stated that it would not be possible to finish surfacing the tennis court until 2016. Brian also reported that he intended to contract for park mowing this year.

It was reported that the engineering on the Watt Family Park was complete, and that work would begin shortly on the west fence for the park. Included in the current grant are the restroom and installation of a drinking fountain.

Attorney Lois Albright announced that she was still working on an ordinance revision to deal more effectively with occupied residences lacking connection to City water and other utilities.

Brian reported that the contract to install the new electrical system at the wellhead was awarded to EC Electric. There were two other bidders.

 

The Request for Proposals for City janitorial services has been issued. Proposals must be submitted by 5 p.m. April 20. Proposals for city planning consultant must be submitted by 5 p.m. May 15.

Brian reported that a trailer has been removed from a property on 8th Street north of the City center, and that the area had been screened. The property has been the subject of a nuisance abatement order for several months. A few items remain to be resolved, Brian said.

The Council set a budget of $2,000 for the Pearl Festival, to be derived from proceeds of the Transient Room Tax.

Shaena suggested having other businesses represented on the Pearl Festival committee.

It was suggested that the Parks Ordinance specify whether and where smoking would be allowed in the City parks, and whether marijuana could be smoked once it becomes legal.

The Council appointed Jackson Morris, Helen Wright and Liane Welch to the Budget Committee.

In her Mayor’s Presentation, Shaena announced that the City would submit a grant request involving the Kilchis Point Reserve, at the request of the Pioneer Museum.

Shaena also announced a special Council workshop in which Paul Levesque would recommend that the City get on board with a proposed high-speed fiber optic cable system. Such a system would make it possible to stream meetings of the City Council live, and would have other advantages as well.

Under Council presentations, Dave Pace recommended that the City prepare signs to post around town, advising residents of upcoming meetings or other activities.

Dave also advised that citizens be dissuaded from painting “No Parking” signs on City streets.

Attorney Lois Albright recommended that the Planning Commission schedule a public hearing on changes to the Development Ordinance in late April, so that the proper notices can be mailed as required by law. She directed that the changes include siting of marijuana-related activities, including dispensaries, growing and processing facilities.

Attorney Albright also reported receipt of a request for production of City records from an organization in California, accompanied by a request that fees be waived. The Council declined to waive the fees for producing the requested records.

Bay City Boosters

The Boosters met at noon Friday, March 27. Mayor Shaena Peterson gave her State of the City report.

The Boosters asked John Sollman to represent them at City Council meetings and report back.

The Boosters told Shaena that they were seeking a grant to light the red rock beautification area for Christmas, advising that P.U.D. would require that the grant request would have to originate with the City. Shaena advised that the Boosters present their request at the next Council meeting on April 14.

The next Boosters meeting will be at noon April 24. Members may bring their potluck and auction items at 11:30 a.m. The Boosters Club is also requesting canned and non-perishable food items for the Food Bank.

Outdoor Burning
2015 burn permits are now available, at no charge, at the City office.

Dog Licenses
Dog licenses are due for renewal, and may be obtained at the City Office. Cost will depend upon the sex or neutered status of the dog, and age of the owner. You must present proof of current rabies vaccination.

Reservations for the DAV Van
County Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that there has been a change in the scheduling of the DAV van that carries veterans to their medical appointments in the Valley. Dispatching of all vans statewide is now centralized in Portland. To schedule a ride, you must call 800-949-1004, ext. 57804, or 503-721-7804, at least four business days before your appointment. Appointments scheduled between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. are eligible for a return trip on the same day.

When scheduling a reservation, provide your pick-up city and date, name and last four digits of your SSN, your phone number, and time and location of your appointment.

Volunteers Needed for Vets’ Service
County Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton is seeking volunteers to drive the van to clinics in Hillsboro and the Veterans’ Hospital. You do not have to be a veteran to drive the van. If you’re interested in a very worthy cause, helping our county’s veterans, give the Vets’ Service Office a call at 503-842-4358.

Veterans’ Service Office
Veterans’ Service Officer Bill Hatton announced recently that the office has been moved. The Veterans’ Service Office is now located in the basement of the Court House. Handicapped parking is available near the rear entrance to the Court House.

Bill also wants veterans to know that the DAV van will continue to depart from the Transportation Building on 3rd Street.

VFW Activity
VFW Post 2848 met Thursday, February 19 and March 19.

Members of the VFW post will demonstrate the folding of the U.S. flag at the grand opening of the Air Museum.

The next meeting of the post will be April 16, 2015, 6 p.m. at the Ad Montgomery Community Hall.

Worn Flags
I often get calls about disposal of worn U.S. flags. Worn flags are to be burned respectfully, and never thrown in the trash. Respectful burning does not mean throwing them in the burn barrel, either.

Our VFW post has accepted many worn flags for disposal. We take them to Waud’s Funeral Home, where they are cremated with the remains of veterans who have died. I can’t think of a more respectful way of disposing of a worn flag than having it accompany a fallen comrade when he or she is being cremated.

“Fresh,” Formerly ArtSpace
Fresh now offers for sale fresh vegetables and other garden produce.

Bay City Arts Center
Artist of the Month for the month of April will be art students at Tillamook High School. A reception for them was held April 10.

April 19 features BCAC’s monthly pancake breakfast, all you can eat for $5.

On April 23, the Women’s Resource Center will host “A Night of Reflection” from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Bay City Arts Center. This is a free event open to the public. April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and this event will provide the community with the opportunity to hear survivor stories of hope and healing, to view local art, and listen to music. Food will also be provided. For more information, contact Romy at (503) 842-8294, ext. 209, or romy@tcwrc.net.

BCAC is compiling a list of music teachers who actively provide individual instrument and voice instruction throughout Tillamook County. Instructors will be screened and contact information will be collected and consolidated. The list will be provided to persons interested in furthering their music education. Teachers interested in participating as part of the Tillamook County Music Teachers Network should contact the BCAC office and ask for Leeaunna, (503) 377-9620.

On May 8, the Tillamook County Pioneer Museum will display the works of Helen Hill until May 8. During the past year, Helen has made pictures of the Kilchis Point Reserve and its many beautiful features.

BCAC is getting its Toddler Art program back up and running. Contact Leeauna at the BCAC office for more details.

Drop-in yoga classes are held Monday and Thursday afternoons at 4 p.m. Cost is $5 per class.

Musicians also wanted! BCAC wishes to start a community symphony orchestra, and is seeking interested and experienced musicians to learn and perform intermediate level music. If you are interested, contact the BCAC office.

To you Arts Center members, if you have an event you would like included in the weekly member update, please email the Arts Center with “Add to Weekly Update” in the subject line.

Follow BCAC on Facebook to learn the latest details and current schedule of events.

The Arts Center depends upon volunteers to make its many programs possible. Volunteers help host events, do public relations work, or build membership. They also help prepare and serve breakfasts and other meals or refreshments, work on grants, or help out in the greenhouse.

The Arts Center could always use a broad range of items, such as dish towels, toilet paper, paper towels, printer paper, pens, sticky pads, legal size envelopes, tape, toilet bowl cleaner, trash bags and stove pellets. Anything you can contribute would be much appreciated.

If you have questions about the Arts Center or its coming events, please call (503) 377-9620. The email address is: baycityartscenter@gmail.com.

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad
Summer is getting closer, and the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad will soon be back in action, offering its round trips from Garibaldi to Rockaway Beach, plus some longer excursions. We’ll talk about that in a later issue of the Back Fence.

The Oregon Coast Crawler will make its fall foliage trip to Salmonberry, with its photo runbys, false starts, and all sorts of other fun things.

The fall foliage trip to Salmonberry will take place this year on October 3, and the cost of the trip will be $125 per person. I will publish more on the trip to Salmonberry in a later issue. But one word of caution. This trip may be a sell-out, and the smart money would suggest that you make your reservations earlier rather than later to avoid being disappointed. Only 120 passengers can be accommodated.

For information, call (503) 292-5055.

Bits and Pieces
Times have been rough. Here I am, just now publishing a new Back Fence. It’s been more than a month. I am very sorry about that.

Starting July 1, and until January 1, 2016, recreational pot will be a home grow operation. Starting January 4, after the OLCC has published its rules, the stuff can be purchased legally at licensed dispensaries.

The Planning Commission will be holding a public hearing on the amendments to the City’s Development Ordinance on Wednesday, April 29. The Commission is proposing restricting marijuana dispensaries to the South High Intensity Zone, as far as possible from places where children are known to congregate. Facilities for growing and processing the weed are proposed to be zoned in the Low Intensity Zone. We don’t have the privilege of forbidding dispensaries in the City. To do that we need to have an election.

Like I said, March was a particularly busy month. Lots to do, including preparing and sending in my tax returns. Ugh!! That job gets more difficult with each passing year.

 

 

 

 

 
     

 

 

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